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AUSTRALIAN.

The action of the V.R.C. in establishing a 6st 71b minimum in all handicaps has (writes "Augur") proved a fruitful topic of converversatiori in racing circles, and the general impression appears to be that the old rule of 6st 7lb for all nandicaps of a mile and under, and 6st for handicaps beyond a mile, was far preferable. ' Probably the first to grumble will be those who have been so anxious for the alteration. The old rule worked remarkably well, but there are grave doubts about the new one, which, it is argued, will do "far more harm than good ; as m the Melbourne Cup young three- year-olds that have shownfair form during their two-year-old career will have to carry something like Bst, and under such an impost, with a terrific pace over two miles, they are much more likely to break down than if they had less weight. Mr Fennelly says that he will have to blister Segenhoe, so that there is not much chance of the son of Maribyrnong putting in an appearance for the St. Leger. This is to be regretted, for had all, gone well with the colt; we might have seen him at his best in the autumn. Mr Richard Rouse has had the bad luck to lose his stallion Wilberf orce, who died a few days ago. Wilberforce was an imported horse, by Oxford from Corsica, by Newminster, and he was imported in 1878. His stock had just begun to snow good form in New South Wales, and the death of so well-bred a horse will be a severe loss to his owner. It is not. often, says the Leader, that the mention of a bookmaker occurs other than in connection~with the metallic pencil ; but on Tuesday aftetaioon last two well-known members of the' ring — namely, Messrs W- Fagan and Louis Green— distinguished themselves at the St. Kilda baths- by saving the life of a young man named Mr Augustus Davis, who would most undoubtedly have lost his life, but for the heroic conduct of the two metalh'cians alluded to. The following horses have been scratched for -the Australian Cup:— The Drummer, Lord Burghley, Lothair, Santa Claus, Taper, Essex, Calm. Newmarket Handicap : Sardonyx, Chatterer7Euclid; Odd~Trick, Verdure, Creswick, Baron yon Mueller, Ghost, Lothair, Morpeth, Britisher, Declamation, Lord of Clyde, Mameluke, Silver Arrow, Walton, Rooftree, Musidora, and Calm. For ' the < Sydney Cup the following horses have declared forfeit :— Comet, Elastic, Henchman, Stella, Rainbow, Recovery, Silver Arrow, Thorntopper, Hilltop, Boniface, Lord of Lake, Grosvenor, 1 . Sportsman, Gladiator, Despot, Brian Boru, Roy's Wife, and Guesswork. Alleged Fraudulent Conspiracy. (From the Melbourne Weekly Times, February 3rd ) The adjourned hearing in the case of Alfred Drake and Patrick Carey, the two bookmakers charged with conspiring to defraud William Quin of £150, was resumed at the City Court Wednesday morning, before Mr Call, P.M., and a bench of Magistrates. Mr M'Kean appeared for the prosecutor, and Messrs C. A. Smyth and Molesworth for the defence. After hearing an objection raised by Mr Smyth as to the validity of the information, the Bench decided to hear evidence. William John Quin, farmer, deposed that he met thejaccused, Carey and Drake, on the 11th January*,- near Kirk's Bazaar. After some conversation in response to a request made by Drake v witness, agreed to make a. joint book with huh on the Victorian Club race meeting. An agreement was afterwards drawn up between the three of them, by which witness placed £150 in the hands of the two accused for investment at the meeting in question. Subsequently visited Drake at his residence at Windsor, and had some gambling transactions with both accused and a , man named ' Wilson, at a Melbourne hotel. Gave Drake ,£4O in cash on the agreement, and a oheque' for, £110. Next day witness, being suspicious of Drake, went to the bank and drew the- £110, but during a visit to Carey's house at Fitzroy, the latter induced him to again join them in their betting transactions. He gave Carey £70, and drew up an agreement similar to that prepared with Drake. Carey subsequently suggested that he should put another £100 in the investments, but witness declined. Applied to Drake to refund him the money he had lent him, but he said he had laid the money, but would act honestly by him. On the day of the races witness asked to see Drake's book, but the latter declined to show it; Was "with Drake on the Hill on the day of the races, but Carey, being a licensed bookmaker, was betting in the saddling paddock. Drake was not a licensed bookmaker. After the' meeting Drake showed him a book which exhibited a loss of £360 on the meeting, and told him that lie was "thirty quid " in his (Drake's) debt. Then left Drake, after telling him he"' would hear from him again. To Mr Molesworth': ,Had had betting transactions for a number of "years.', Did not think he was a defaulting gambler,' Believed he had owed Joe Thompson £10 for the last two years; also owt3d J 'two Qther bookmakers £10 each. Might tiwej sonic other trifling wagers, but could, n'ofc ; remember any. To Mr Smyth : Had previously had betting transactions with Carey. Won £17 10s from him on the Caulfield Cup, whicl^ sum he paid. Carey had always paid him whenever he (witness) won money from him. Lost about £15 when throwing dice with Carey and Drake. He did not pay the bet he lost to Joe Thompson because the horse was scratched at the time he backed him. Had an interest at one time in a horse called Mack. Detective O'Donnell deposed to arresting the prisoners, and in reply to a question about the money, Drake, upon being apprehended, said, "You've got a warrant, that's all you get out of inc." He found several documents, promissory notes, cheques, &c, in Drake's possession. One of the cheques was endorsed by Drake, and the signature thereon appeared similar to that on the agreement between prisoner and Quin. % Mr M'Kean asked that the case should be adjourned, to allow an expert to compare the signatures. Mr Call refused to grant the request. The evidence then closed, and after consultation, mr.- Mr Cal} said the evidence did not show that the prosecutor had paid over any money to the prisoners, while the production of the books and other documents favoured the defence. The Bench, therefore, would dismiss the case. The prisoners were accordingly discharged.

SPORTING NOTES FROM MELBOURNE. (By Our Sbeoial Correspondent, " Warrior.") "Spero" has shown a little more "savee" than the New Zealand "barber." The latter, I am told, levanted with the sweep money ; but the Hotham grocer sits quietly in his shop selling cheese and fresh onions at £d per Ib, the profits of which he devotes to the " puffing up" of his late swindle, " The Grand National Investment Association," or " Spero's Totaliitor Club," the fee for membership being set

down at the extravagant sum of 12d, or 241b of " anions." Parties in Dunedin wishing* to join this money-making business mustn't forget when sending their cheques for membership to enclose two postage stamps of the value of 81b of onions, care of A. Easton, grocer, Hotham, Melbourne, in the Colony of Victoria, not above 16,000 miles from Gravesend. What audacity ! This is the man, or the company, "Mr and Mrs Spero," who last Cup meeting was pounced upon by the detectives, and (after a number of Court adjournments) heavily fined. Up to that period he had received upwards of £1800 for investment in several totalisator sections, and the holders of Assyrian had to be satisfied with 8s 6d in the pound or get nothing, and the " Spero Company " to receive the balance of £1000 for law expenses, shop being closed, and loss of business on the sale of onions." These are the sort of swindles— the "Polk Company," for instance — that are doing more injury to horse-racing in Victoria than the small fry of bookmakers or cardsharpers; because a respectable citizen will not have anything to do with blacklegs, but they are enticed by advertisements to have a shot at the respectable "Polk" or "Spero" totalisator clubs. Why don't the Parliament legalise the machine, and then we should not hear of such disgraceful swindles as above narrated. While on the subject of bookmakers and totalisators, I might mention the latest dodge practised by the tinpot bookies, who played ducks and drakes with an unfortunate farmer at the late Victoria Club meeting. It appears that a man named Carey, who is a V.R.O. licensed bookmaker, but not a member of the Victorian Club, in company with a pal named Drake, proceeded to Flemington on Saturday week for the purpose of making up a £500 book. The spiders induced a fly named Quinn, a man who knows as much about horseracing as he does of chemistry, to throw in £150 ; if they were successful, the proceeds to be equally divided. The " mug, after the races were over, was informed that the bank was £60 to the bad. The grower of oatmeal couldn't see it, so he made inquiries, and it turned out that the duck and drake had gone off with a profit of £400. Quinn being incensed at their conduct, handed the beautiful pair over to their rightful owners, the police authorities, on a charge of having conspired to defraud, This is how half the vagabonds of Melbourne get their livelihood. The weights for the principal events to be run at the V.R.C. Autumn and the Hawkesbury and A. J.C. meetings were declared yesterday. Commotion heads the list for the Australian Cup (9st 101b), Hawkesbury Handicap (9st 121b), and Sydney Cup (9st 121b). For the first event I like nothing better than Pollio, 6 yrs, 7st 51b. The son of Tim Whiffler won it last year with 6st 71b up in 4 mm. sec, and I think he is, from his present condition, good enough to repeat the dose. If Coriolanus is the horse I take him to be, 7sfc 51b should not be in his way ; the same with Santa Claus, who has grown into a big four-year-old, and should carry 7st 21b with ease. Of the horses under 7st I like none better than Calma (6st 111b), Essex (Gst 51b), and King of the Vale (6st 91b). Stockwell, with Bst 31b on his back, is rather too heavily handicapped. Wellington, half-brother to Commotion, with Bst 121b up, could only secure second place last year, therefore the champion with 121b more in the saddle can't possibly get that far. Willeroo (7st 101b), Britisher (7st 61b), and Lothair (7st 51b) I like best in this division. Guesswork with Bst 31b stands no show, but First Water (Bst) I should prefer among the eight-stone lot. Mr Whittingham's pair head the list for the Newmarket Handicap -Larpent (6 yrs., 6st 51b) and Aspen, who has won two of these races, in 1880 and 1881 (Bst 131b), Hesperian and Sardonyx. I must defer my remarks on this race and the Hawkesbury and Sydney Cup for my next letter. Rumour has it that Yeomans leaves the saddle for something more profitable, and that Mr Long, of Grand Flaneur renown, purposes racing horses in England next season, and intends taking Home the Australian Archer — Tommy Haies. Tuesday, 3 p.m. The result of the oricket match has just been wired over. The fads of the Australians are walking Collins street like mutes and pall-bearers. All the six to fours and two to ones on the Australians sing very small. " Sixty-nine runs, and to be beaten on our own grounds ! " is the exclamation of the Victorians

RACING IN AUSTRALIA. GEELONG. February Ist and 2nd. geelgng gold cup, Value 100 guineas, with 200 eovs and a sweep of 10 so ya each add d.' Two miles. Mr E De Meatre'B br h Gudarz, by Yattendon— Luna, 4 yrs, Bst 31b .. .. (Haleß) 1 Mr J Leek's b c Colstoun, 3 yrs, 7ot 31b (Robinson) 2 Mr W Branch's b c Mistaken, 3 yrs, 7st 81b , (C Moore) S Mr C Wilson m eh h Odd Trick, aged, Bst lib (O'Brien) 0 Mr R Howie's b h Lothair, 5 yrs, 7st 71b (Geogahan) 0 Mr J A Lang's eh c King of the Vale, 3 yrs, 6st 71b iMusgrave) 0 Mr J M'Keßzie' 1 ' b m Kathleen Mavourneen, 5 yw, 6sfc . . . . . . ' . . (Cracknell) 0 Betting : 7 to 4 agst Mistaken ; 5 to 2 agst Odd Trick, G to 1 agst Kathleen Mavourneen, Gudarz, and Colstoun, 10 to 1 each agst Lothair and King of the Vale. After a couple of attempts the horses went away to an excellent start, all of them being on their le^s together. For some distance it was impossible to tell which horse was leading. Kathleen Mavourneen was h'rst to show decidedly in front; King of the Vale was at the head of the others. Approaching the turn into the straight King of the Vale was leading, Kathleen Mavourneen and Gudarz were next, the others were close together. Passing the stand the horses were running in the following order, King of the Vale, Mistaken^ Qudarz, Odd Trick, Oolstoun, and Lothair last. As they rounded the next turn Mistaken took first place. King of the Vale, Gudarz and Odd Trick were at the head of the others. Odd Trick ran up to the leaders going along the back stretch, and Colstoun wont up l on the outside as they neared the far turn, but soon dropped back again. Rounding the far turn Gudarz was leading, with King of the Vale nearly level. Odd Trick, Mistaken, Colstoun, Kathleen Mavourneen, and Lothair were well together. Gudarz led along by the bushes and into the straight, where Mistaken and Colstoun came up to him. Odd Trick dropped back, and Lothair, well outside, made a run up, but soon died away. Gudarz held his place all the way, and won by a length ; Colstoun was second, Mistaken third, about threequarters of a length a,way ; King of the Vale was fourth, Kathleen Mavourneen fifth, Lothair sixth, and Odd Trick last. Time, 3 mm. 42 sec. SIRES' PRODUCE STAKES, A sweepstakes of 10 soys each, with 160 boys added by the Club and 240 boys from the nominators of sires, For then two-year-olds ; colts. Sat 101b ;

fillies 88t 71b. The winner of tho Maribyrnoug Plate or V.R C. Two-year-old Stakes on Now Year's Day to carry 71b extra ; of any two Buch races, 101b extra. Distance, seven furlongs. Mr James Wilson's br c Off Colour, by King °ole - The Gem .. .. .. (Moore) 1 Messrs Robertson and Wagner's br c St. Lawrence, by Glorious— Perfection .. .. (O'Brien) 2 Sir Thos. Elder's eh f Monsoon, by Gang ForwardTyphoon .. ..' .. (Cracknell) 3 Mr VV. Lang's br c Napier, by King Colc-Frou Frou .. .. .. (Lang) 0 Mr AI. Jacob's br c Tabletop, by Glorious—Eurydice .. .. .. (Pigott) 0 Betting : 3to 1 on St. Lawrence, 4to 1 agst Monsoon. Soon after they got away Monsoon went to the front, St. Lawrence, Off Colour, Tabletop, and Napier following in that order. As they reached the bushes Off Colour went up to Monsoon ; Tabletop and St. Lawrence were next, about a couple of lengths off; Napier was about five lengths away. Off Colour led into the straight, Monsoon, Tabletop, St. Lawrence, and Napier being next in that order. St. Lawrence passed Tabletop and Monsoon in the straight, but could not get near Off Colour, who won by five clear lengths. St. Lawrence was second, Monsoon third ? Tabletop fourth, and Napier last. Time, 1 nun. 32 sec. MARES' PRODUCE STAKES, A sweepstakes of 10 soys each/h ft at 10 a.m. on the day preceding the race, with 150 soys added by the Club. For then three-year-olds- col ta, B=t 71b ; fillies, Bst 71b. Oue mile and a-half. The second horse to receive 60 6ovs out of the stake, and the third to save his stake. Mr M Jacob's br c The Plunger, by Argus Scandal Lady Ellen, Bst 101b .. .. (Pi,'Ott) 1 Mr Win Pearson's b c Fryingpan, by Bethnal Gieen -Saucepan, Bst 101b .. .. (Power) 2 Mr James Wilson's b c Belmont, by King of the Ring— ldalia, Bst 101b . . . . (Moore) 3 Mr H Burrell'a br c Boolka, by Glorious— Bridget, BstlOlb .. .. . (Murpby) 0 Betting : 6 to 4 agst Fryingpan, 2 to 1 The Plunger, 4 to 1 Boolka. The quartette were sent away well together at the first attempt. Belmont, on the inside, was the first to show in front. Boolka was pulled back to last place. Aftor rounding the turn past the stand The Plunger went up nearly level with Belmont, the pair racing together along the back stretch. Fryingpan was about a couple of lengths away, Boolka was last about four lengths off. Rounding the far turn The Plunger was leading by a couple of lengths, Belmont and Fryingpan were next about a length apart. Boolka, who had crept up, was a little over a length away. At the bushes The Plunger was still leading, Fryingpan and \ Belmont were together and close up, Boolka was about a clear length behind them. The Plunger was clear in front as they neared the turn for home, Fryingpan had taken second place, Belmont and Boolka were next about two lengths apart. The Plunger came up the straight well in front, Fryingpan being unable to get up, Belmont was next, and Boolka was'beaten. The Plunger won in a canter, a length and a quarter in front of Fryingpan. Belmont followed after a gap of about eight lengths, Boolka Avas last. Time, 2 mm. 40 sec. GEELONG HANDICAP, Of 10 soys each, with 125 boys added. One mile and a-half. Mr W Branch's b c Little Jack, bylting Cole — Charade, 3 yrs, 7st 21b .. .. (Moore) 1 Mr C Wilson ns eh h Odd Trick, aged, Bst 31b , (O'Brien) 2 Mr J M'Kenzie's b in Kathleen Mavourneen, 5 yrs 6st 3lb . . . . (Cracknell) 3 Mr E Do Mestre's br h Oudarz, 4 yra, Bst 121b (Hales) 0 Mr R Howie's b h Lothair syrs, 7st 91b (Geojjahan) 0 Mr J A LaDg's eh c King of the Vale, 3 yrs, 6st 101b (Musgrave) 0 Hon W Pearson's b m Taper, 4 yrs, 6»t 71b (Richmond) 0 Betting : Even on Little Jack, sto 2 against Odd Trick, 5 to 1 Gudarz, 7 and 8 to 1 any other. After several attempts a very fair start was effected, Lothair being the first to show in front, with Little Jack immediately behind him ; Gudarz was last. Lothair led round the the turn, Little Jack and King of the Vale were next, the others being in a bunch. Gudarz was following after a gap of fully three lengths. Going along the back stretch Lothair maintained his place in front, Kathleen Mavourneen and Odd Trick had go up nearly level with Little Jack, who was still second ; then followed Taper, King of the Vale, and Gudarz in that order. Rounding the far turn Lothair was still in front with Kathleen Mavourneen well up on the outside, Little Jack and Odd Trick were very handy. Soon after rounding the turn Kathleen Mavourneen went went past Lothair, =md at the bushes she gave place to Odd Trick, Little Jack was third, and Gudarz had joined the leading division. Little Jack led into the straight with Odd Trick and Gudarz close up, Kathleen Mavourneen, Lothair, and Taper were next, King of the Vale was beaten off. Little Jack held his place all the way home, and won by two lengths ; Odd Trick was second, and Kathleen Mavourneen third, about eight lengths away. Gudarz was fourth, after a gap of five lengths ; Lothair was fifth, Taper sixth, and King of the Vale last. Time, 2min. 40sec. ►

ENGLISH. Mr J. E. Keene's horses have been removed from William Day's and placed under the charge of Richard Marsh, at Newmarket — not S r any means a sudden change, as the Duke of amilton's trainer was asked to take charge of the horses more than 12 months ago, but at that time he had not room for them. With Mr Lorillard's horses placed under the charge of Tom Cannon a great shuffling of the American cafds has taken place. Foxhall has been withdrawn from the salelist, and will be put into training again. The present and coming seasons will (says the Field) be remembered m stud annals from the giants of the land that have died, and the noticeable animals that have left the post tor the paddock. Adventurer, Blair Athol, Brown Bread, and Strathconan have all died during the present year, and each comes in for posthumous honours ; but whereas Adventurer died in the full tide of success, Strathconan's name was kept greet green in the land by a long array of winners, and Brown Bread has living representatives of merit in Toastmaster, Sweetbread, and Shrewsbury, Blair Athol had almost outlived his reputation, Petticoat, Athol Maid, and Baliol being the only animals in his list of winners worth a passing word. In direct contrast to Blair Athol, we find Adventurer leaving behind him in Adriana an animal that will, providing all goes well with her, show form that would make the reputation of any sire. Adventurer stands sixth in the sires of winners, with 9894 soys, contributed by 13 winners of 23 races ; the only yearling by him sold by public auction this year realised 700 guineas. Blair Athol's yearlings averaged 363 guineas for 10, the highest figures being 1000 guineas and 850 guineas ; while for the same number by Strathconan an average of 242 guineas was obtained, with 1100 guineas as the highest piice. It may be nqted in passing that Blair AthoPs progeny have won in stakes on the English turf alone over 170,000 soys, and that he earned at the stud in round numbers 70,000 soys. He was at the head of the list in 1872, 1873, 1875, and.

1877, the highest amount — 28,830 soys — being in 1877, the year of that moderate horse Silvio. Only once was Newminster's great son, Adventurer, at the top of the tree, that being in 1864, when, thanks, in a great measure, to Apology, 21,637 soys were placed to the credit of his progeny. He has, however, been usually there or thereabouts, and ran up to Thormanby in 1869, and to Hermit in 1880. Beau Brummel has been backed for the Derby at 2200 to 100. The Prince has found favour for the Two Thousand Guineas at 800 to 100. The following is a list of last year's foals of the most prominent sires :—: — Rosicrucian .. ..32 Cymbal .. ..18 Uncas 30 Lowlander .. .18 Pellegrino .. ..28 Springfield .. ..17 Hermit 26 Sir Bevya .. ..16 Blair Athol .. ..25 Skylark .. ..15 Sterling .. ..24 Scottish Chief .. 16 Psro Gomez .. ..24 Wenlock .. ..16 Kisber 23 Muncaator .. ..14 Beauulerc .. ..23 Petrarch .. ..14 Hampton .. ..23 Wisdom .. ..14 Speculum .. ..23 Creuiorne .. ..14 Wild Oats .. ..22 See-Saw „ ..13 Prince Charlie . . 20 Cumballo 13 Silvio 20 Craig Millar .'. '.'. 12 Strathconan „ ..20 Adventurer .. ..10 Albert Victor.. .. 19 Macaroni .. .. 9 At the sale of the late Mr F. Gretton's horses on January Ist, that grand horse Isonomy was bought by Mr W. S. Crawfurd for £9000. The total of the sale amounted to £19,022, the principal lots being as follows :— Isonomy, by Sterling — Isola Bella, £9000; Preston Pans, by Prince Charlie— Beatrice, £1560 ; Acrostic, by See-saw — Lady Alice Hawthorne, £1400; Geologist, by SterlingSiberia, £1150. The Hon. George Harry Grey, Earl of Stamford and Warrington, died recently at his residence, aged 56 years. As a supporter of the turf and a member of the Jockey Club Lord Stamford was well known. He occupied the nineteenth position in the list of winning owners last year, with a credit of 11 races won and worth £5151 15s, of which the famous Geheimness contributed £3375 when she won the Oaks at Epsom on the 26th of May. In 1881 he was twelfth on the list, with 17 races won, valued at £6171. As an owner Lord Stamford was very popular, &» was shown by the cheering with which his success at Epsom was received, although the "light blue, black, and gold " had been seen but little compared with the show it made early in the sixties," when the late Joseph Dawson had at one time as many as 60 horses in training belonging to Lord Stamford. It was in 1860 that he won the Ascot Gold Cup with Rupee. In 1861 he won the Two Thousand Guineas with Diophantus, but with the same colt could get no better than third for the Derby. In 1862 he was second for the One Thousand Guineas, with Bertha, and in 1863 he was first and second for the same event with Lady Augusta and Flying Fish, but standing Flying Fish alone for the Oaks she failed to get a Jlace. The same year Lord Stamford won the uly Stakes with Cambuscan and the Yorkshire Handicap with Dulcibella. In 1865 he took the New Stakes with Chibisa, and in 1868 the Chesterfield Cup with Charmwood. After 1868 the colours were seen less frequently, nor did they take any prominent position until the Bibury Club meeting tit Stockbridge in June, when Tom Cannon having sold his flying filly Geheimness, he rode her for Lord Stamford at that and at subsequent meetings. He also rode her for the Oaks, but having to ride Mr Keene's Romeo for the St. Leger, Geheimness, with Loates up, was beaten by a length and a half by Lord Falmouth's Dutch Oven, with Archer up. The disqualifications by reason of Lord Stamford's death are somewhat limited, and include a few for the 2000 and 1000 Guineas, the Derby and Epsom Grand Prize, the Doncaster, St. Leger, and for several stakes at Ascot and Goodwood. The melancholy death of Mr Henry Jones, well known as the breeder of thoroughbred horses, is reported. The circumstances associated with the death of this respected gentleman are the cause of deep regret to a large circle of friends. He committed suicide, and was found hanging in his stable at Littleport, near Ely, quite dead. It seems that he had become bondsman for someone, a defaulting party, for £1800 a little time previous, and the matter so preyed upon his mind that he resolved to commit the rash act above described. The stout figure of Mr Jones, a genial opencountenanced farmer, had for years been known at Newmarket, to which place he sent many famous racers, including Prince Charlie— "the Prince of the T. Y. C."— whom he owned in conjunction with the late Joseph Dawson, when the latter was master of Bedford Lodge. Hester, Thuringian Prinoe, Camel, Lydon, Athol Lad, Duchess of Edinburgh, Little Nell, and Camilla were all bred by the late Mr H. Rees, and most of them were from that gold mine in the way of brood mares, Eastern Princess. Mr Jones was naturally exceedingly proud when anything bred by himself won a race, but perhaps the very happiest moment of his life was on the Saturday of t.he Cambridgeshire week of 1874, when Prince Charlie defeated Peut-etre in their memorable match over the Rowley Mile. The engagement was made soon after the Cambridgeshire, Joseph Dawson acthigfor Mr Jones, and Harry Jennings on behalf of M. Aurnont. Victory rested with Prince Charlie, who won in a canter, though only by three-quar-ters of a length. After Parry, who rode him, had weighed in, a big saddle was placed on the back of the horpe, and Mr Jones rode him in triumph off the Heath, and through the town of Newmarket to Bedford Lodge, amid the plaudits of the people. The foreigners thought so highly of the performance of Prince Charlie that they offered £10,000 for him, but, said Mr Jontes in reply. "Double that sum would not buy the horse." To this day at Newmarket the riding home of Prince Charlie is talked about, and plenty of regret will be expressed at the sad end of the breeder of that famous racer. The celebrated sire Prince Charlie was to be offered at auction on January Bth. Foremost among the winning horses of last season are the following : — Horee. Age. Races won. Amount. Shotover 3 6 £12,205 Macheath 2 3 10,598 Dutch Chen 3 4 7,762 Tristin 4 9 6,641 .Quicklime 3 2 «,257 Kookery 2 6 3,880 Wallemtein 6 2 3,676 Hauteur 2 5 3,403 St. Marguerite 3 3 3,390 Geheimntas 3 1 3,375 Warden 3 3 3,170 The total amount of stakes won in Great Britain last season, exclusive of matches, was over £400,000. Leaving out amounts won by second and third horses, it was £393,141. The "added money" alone was £263,329, of which about one-half was given to races under six furlongs, one- sixth to races under, a mile, onesixth to races under a* mile and a-half, and one-sixth to races of a mile and a-half and upwards. Ireland contributed 'only £8470 to the amount, and Scotland only £7,168. It is, we believe, in contemplation to give £1000 to a hurdle race at the spring meeting at Derby,

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AUSTRALIAN., Otago Witness, Issue 1630, 17 February 1883

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4,851

AUSTRALIAN. Otago Witness, Issue 1630, 17 February 1883

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