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June 7th, Bth.

(THE SALFORD BOROUGH HANDIOAP, Of 1000 soys, added to a handicap sweepstakes of 20 bovb each. Seven furlongs. 77 subs. Duke of Montrose's b h Strathblane, by Kingcraft out of Moss Rose, fl yrs, Bat Blb .. (Kell«tt) 1 Mr Vyner's Charibert, 5 yrs, lOafc 81b . . (F. Archer) 2 Mr C. Thornbey'B Helicon, 3 yrs, 7st 71b (Collins) 8 Lord De Clifford's Essayez, 4 yrs, Bst 2lb (Bell) 4 Mr M. Brown's New Laund, 6 yrs, 9st 81b (Bruckshaw) 0 Col. Forester's Tower and Sword, 6 yrs, Oat lib (Maidment) 0 Lord Wilton's Toastmaster, i yrs, Bst 181b (Osborne) 0 Mr T. Fotheratonhaugh's War Horn, 4 yw, Bst 121b (Rossiter) 0

Mr W. Bourke'B Noble Lord, 4 yrs, Bit 101b (Snowden) 0 Lord Bradford's Sword Dance, 4 yrs, Bat 61b (W. Macdonald) 0 Sir J. D. ABtley's Microphone, 4 yrs, 7st 131b (O, Wood) 0 Mr F. Gretton's Alchemist, 5 yrs, 7st 131b (Morgan) 0 Lord Hastings' Sir Marmaduke, 3 yrs, 7st 121b (Barrett) 0 Mr T. Cannon's Buxton, 4 yrs, 7st 111b (Lemaire) 0 Mr C. Langley's Van Dyke, 4 yrs, 7st 101b (carried Tstlllb) .. '. .. (WatW 0 Mr R. S. Evans' Monntrose, 3 yrs, 7st 91b (Greaves) 0 Mr P. H. Cooper's George Mansfield, 3 yrs, 7st 81b (Fftgan) 0 Mr B. Ellam's King Humbert, 3 yrs, 7et 3lb (J. Macdonald Mr R. Vyner's b g Nordenskjold, 3 yrs, 6st 71b (Woodburn) 0 Mr J. Smith-Barry's Pelagia, 3 yrs, 6st 51b (Roden) 0 Betting : sto 1 agab War Horn, 6to 1 agst Charibert, 10 to 1 each agst Essayez and Buxton, 100 to 8 agst Scratnblane, 100 bo 7 each agst Tower and Sword, Toastmaster, Sword Dance, Microphone, Van Dyke, and George Mansfield, and 20 to 1 each agst Alchemist, King Humbert, Nordeuakjold, and Pelagia- In a delay of 20 minutes War Horn waa nearly always standing in front of the poet, and when thefUg fell she got away with the lead from Van Dyke aud Alchemist, of whom Van Dyke quiokly settled down in command. He was then followed by Sir Marmaduke, War Horn, Microphone, next to whom laid Nordenakjold, Charibert, Tower and Sword, Sword Dance, and Buxton, with King Humbert and New Lannd acting tn whippers-in. They ran thus until entering the straight, when Sir Marmaduke, on the raila, was joined by Van Dyke, and they came on from War Horn, Sword Dasc% aud Alchemist, until a quarter of a mile from home, when Charibert secured a good berth ia the heels of Sir Marmaduke, with Eis*yez, Helicon, and Strathblano also joiniug the foremoßt rank in the centre of the course. Before reaching the distance War Horn and Van Dyke compounded, and there wai little to choose between Sir Marmaduke, E^sayez, and Helicon, until a coupla of hundred yards from home, when Archer sent Charibert through, and for a few strides he looked a gallant winner. As soon as Strathblaae had quitted the centre lot, and challenged for the supremacy, however, the scale turned, and, with the top-weight ' easing off from the centre of the stand, he was beat«n by two lengths, and saved second place by a neck from HeVcpn; the sam.B hstween tiiird and fourth. Sir Marm^duke, <Stvord Dance, and Van D,yk.e were next, close up, a gap separating them from Alchemist, Buxton, Toastmaster, and New Laund, with King Humbert last of all. Value of the stake, L 15556. ' THE MANCHESTER CUP, Oi 2000 aovs, added to a, handicap sweepstakes of 25 soya each. About one mile and three-quarters.. 138 subs. Captain Machell's br h Valour, by Victor, dam by Mount Zion out of Sister to Carri^, C yrs, Bst 91b (including 51b extra) . . . . (F. Archer) 1 Sir J. D. Astley's Peter, B yrs, 35 1 131b (G. Wood) 2 Mr G. Lambert's Sea Horse, i yrs, Cist 51b (carried 6st7lb .. •• •• (Beach) 3 Mr F. Gretton's Fernandez, 4 yrs, 9st (Cannon) 0 Mr Jardine's eh c Teviotdale, 4 yrs, 7st 131b (Kellett) 0 Lord Durham's Ridotto, 6 yrs, 7st 121b (Collins) 0 Mr W. Bourko's Noble Lord, 4 yrs, 7st lib (J. Macdonald) 0 Mr H. Brad's Lizzio Long, 3 yrs, 6st 101b (Bell) 0 Lord Wilton's Cylinder, 4 yrs, Gst 91b (Weston) 0 Mr T. Brown's Spitzbergen, 4 yrs, Gst Clb (carried Ostlllbj .. .. .. (Greaves) 0 Mr Bhnton's Evasion, 4 yrs, Gst 71b (Gallon) 0 Mr F. Gretton's Sideral, 5 yrs, 6sfc Clb (carried 6st 91b) .. •• •• (Trickle) 0, Mr I. Bate's Favorita, 3 yrs, Cst 51b (Elliott) 0 Mr R. S. Evan's Mr Dodd, 6 yrs, 6st 51b (Rawlinson) 0 Mr J. Whittaker's Lady of the Lake, 4 yrs, Gat 2lb (R. Coates) 0 Lord Falmouth'B Ambassadress, I yrs, Ost nib (Barrett) o i

Mr C. Perkins' Caper Sauce, 3 yrs, sst 111b (E. Martin) 0 Sir H. de Trafford's eh c Biilycock, 3 yrs, sst 101b (Goodway) 0

Betting : 3 to 1 agsfc Fernandez, 9 to 2 agst Peter, 6 to 1 agst Cylinder, 7 to 1 a«st Ambassadress, 8 to 1 agst Toviotdale, 100 to 6 agst Ridotto, 20 to 1 agst; Mr Dodd, 25 to 1 agat Valour and Evasion, 33 to 1 each agat L:zzie Long, Spitz aargen, Sea Horse, and Billycock, 40 to 1 agst Carer Saucr, and 50 to 1 agat Noble Lord. „,..... The fl*g fell at the third or fourth attempt, and Valour, on the inside, j uoiped away clear o£ Spitzbergen, Noble hoed, Lizzte Long, Caper Sauce, and Cylinder, the next lot being Evasion, Favourite, Ambassadress, and Lady of the Lake, with Fernandez and Sideral in the roar. After holding his own for nearly a quarter of a mile, Valour was pulled back, and Spitzbergen having taken the inside berth, be iaeld a slight lead past the Stand from Caper Sauce, Noble Lord, and L'zzie Long., In their wake came Evasion, Cylinder, Mr Dodd, and Valour, with Ambassadress, Favorita, and Billycock, separated from the rear rank, while Sideral whipped in behind Peter and Fernandez As they turned out of the straight Spitz oergen added to his com' mand from Sea Hone, Evasion, and Caper Sauce, a gap dividing them from Mr Dodd, Valour, Lizzie Long, and Ambassadress, with Cylinder, Teviotdale, and Ridotto next, and Favorita, Lady of the Lake, and Sidaral forming the tail. At the mile post Evasion, on the outside, drew into second place, and was pursued by Noble Lord, Caper Sauce, Ambassadress, Mr Dodd, and Lizzie Long for another quarter of a mile, when Peter and Fernandez joined Teviotdale, Valour, and Cylinder, Ridotto at the same time joining the beaten division. Very soon afterwards Fenian* dez hung out signals of distress, and with Spitzbergen continuing to crowd sail, he waa then three lengths ahead of Sea Horse and Evasion on entering the straight. Behind these came Lizzie Long, Valour, Caper Sauce, and Teviotdale, until a quarter of a mile from home, when Evasion vanished, as did in quick succession Lizzie Long, Caper Sauce, and Teviotdale. The vacancies mentioned left the issue in a very narrow compass, and Sea Horse having taken his place at the girths of Spitzbergen, Valour went on third in their heels, with Pater fourth, in the middle of the course, to the distance, and Ambassadress struggling on at the head of the remainder. At the distance Spitzbergen was dona with, and Sea Horae having resigned at the lower end of the stand to Valour and Peter, they at onca quitted him and ran an exciting race home. Although Valour wa3 compounding visibly, Peter did not run altogether straight at tha finish, and the upshot was that Captain Machell'a horse secured the verdict by a neck, with two lengths each separating second and third and third and fourth. Ambassadress was a bad fifth, a hundred yards from Caper Sauce, Fernandez, and Cylinder, with Lady of the Lake and Mr Dodd next, and Favorita last. Time, 3 mia 221 sec. Value of the stakes. L 2502. Intense excitement was felt in the meeting between Bend Or and Robert the Devil in the Epsom Cop. The Sportsman says :— " In the Gold Cup the two great rivals for turf honours, Robert the Devil and Bend Or, were to meet / once again, and decide the question at hsue between them. The Lager hero was decidedly the popular favourite, and even amongst the 'groat unwashed* of the course, Robert was considered good enough 'to do the trick," though heie and there might be found a staunch believer in the 'pace' of the City and Suburban winner. Four o'clock was the tima set for the struggle, and the two candidates— 3 who, by the way, bad the field to themselves— were punctually in attendance at the starting* post. The course had been cleared, every point? of advantage had been seized, and people! waited in breathless excitement for the start. The usual cry of ' They're off ' waß accompanied by a sigh of relief. When the pair passed tha famous Corner some enthusiastic sportsman raised the cry, ' Bend Hor wins t The chestnut wins II 11I 1 This cry spread rapidly as the horses drew near the winning-post, until Archer— 1 with his hands well down, and sitting as easily as though he had been posing for a portrait—' sailed in an easy winner. Then a mighty cheer burst forth in honour of the victor*" Peter started a hot favourite for the Gold Vase at Ascot, but half way round he stopped to kick and buck, and Wood could not set him going again. In the Royal Hunt Cup he repeated the performance j but as will be seen in another column Archer, who then had the mount, got him straight in time to win tho race handsomely* A horse who oan win from 19 others, after stopping dead short aa he did, must be a wonder. Town Moor broke down so badly in the Ascot T.) rby that Lord Rosebery will probably not lie a'.^Q to start him for the Sc. Leger, for which we he had been backed at 7 to 1. The winner of the Coronation Stakes afc Ascot proves to have been Mr H- Savile's eh i Mazurka, by Sac Saw — Mabille. Sir J. D. Astley has issued a challenge to match his five-year-old horse Peter at weight-for-age against any three-year-old in the world for 1000 guineas, the match to come off afc Newmarket in October. This is evidently meant for the owners of Iroquois and Foxhal). " Mr Norman," owner of Peregrine, is Capt, Robert Grodvenor, a son of the Duke of Westminster. American papers to hand by the San Fran* cisco mail show that most exaggerated statements have been made about Mr Lorillard'a winnings on Iroquois in the English Darby. The Tribune's New York special denies that Lorillard won 2,000,000d0l on Iroquois, but says the amount waa only 12,500d01, of which he ordered 5000 Jol to be turned ovejf ia Archer, who rode Iroquois. Another New York paper says : — " The announcement of the victory of Iroq>uoi» created considerable excitement in Jersey <.City 0 where Lorillard's tobacoo factory is situated, A wire had been run into Mayor Leidler'a private office in the factory, and information of Iroquois' wonderful performance waa ticked into the offioe as soon as the race was over. Flags were flying on the factory building before the < news waa announced in New York. Lorillaidj on being interviewed, said : ' I had very little money on Iroqnoia —my money was on the other two. I only won about L 2500— enough to pay my traiue? aud jockey, I cabled over word to give Archer LIOOO for his aucoesM.' " A gentleman who has close business relations with Lorillaid says of him:— "He does nofe send his horses to England merely to win races for money. I know his bets on the Darby wero very small. His object is to show the superiority of American horses when correctly bred." A London correspondent of au American paper telegraphs that ainca tha victory of Iroquois, Mrs Lorillard, who is now in London, has been visited and congratulated by numbersof ladies connected with tho leading members of the British turf. The London Sportsman says that Mr Loriliard won L 2500 in bets, gave Archer LIOOO, and mode his trainer, Pincers, f» handsome prasett Tho Tribnue says that Iroquois ia tho ooa oif

an imported English stallion, the best ever brought to the United States, and that as the Americau turf is the outgrowth of the English, it is foolish to endeavour to exalt the farmer at the expense of the latter. The heaviest winner over Iroquois was Mr Howland Bobbins, a New York merchant, who secured LIB.OOO by backing the coli. Concerning the Grand Prix, EDghsh telegrams to the American pupera say that after the race Freachmen were declaring their satisfaction with the result, and shrieking tor Foxhall as freely aa the Americana themselves. Nor are they much to blame, for the finish between Foxhall and Tnstan was the grandest seen for years. Fordham on the American, and Archer on the Eaglisb-bred Tristan, rode as if for their lives, and the American horse just won by a head. The scene that followed the race was one of the wildest ever seen at Longchampß, and in an instant dozens of American flags were produced, several of the four-in-hands being literally covered with them, and on the track the crowd was bo donse that it waß almost impossible for Fordham and Archer to get back to the scales, and it was only finally accomplished by tbe aid of a large police force. Fordham, who is well known to the Parisians, waa stormed with congratulations. Keene said to a Tribune reporter: "My brother, who was present, and my trainer, Sherrard, cabled me Saturday about the result of the private trial. They Baid the colt was in perfeot condition. Gn this, I did expect success, but still I knew how often things go wrong, and if he hod not carried off first money I should not have been greatly disappointed, as I never allow such things to worry me. I only wagered a small amount— jußt enough to make it interesting. There is nothing that will take young men away from gambling-tables quicker than the legitimate running of horses." Before the reporter retired, Keene said he intended to send over a batch of youngsters which he purchased in Kentucky, as one horse in 15 generally proveß good. He would not be content until he won a Derby, and intends to wait patiently for that honour. His parting words were: "For the credit of American breeding and American horses, I am very glad of Foxhall's victory."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18810806.2.70

Bibliographic details

Otago Witness, Otago Witness, Issue 1552, 6 August 1881

Word Count
2,434

June 7th, Bth. Otago Witness, Issue 1552, 6 August 1881

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