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News of the Week.

Several sections, the deferred - payment Hcsrses ovt-v which had been cancelled, wera open for application at the Land Office, Dunedin, on Wednesday, with tbefollowing resultsSection 33, block VII, Waihemo, no applicacatiun; section 12, block TT. Nokoroai, no application ; section 17, block XII, Ohatton, four applications ; section 8, block 111, Otama, one application ; section 12, block 111. Otama, three applications; section 16, block 111, Otama, one application ; section 29, block 111, Otama, no application. In all probability applications for some of the sections will have been received also at other officts, such as at Invercargill, or at Macraes, in the csse of the Waihemo section. The necessary auction sale in the case of those for which more than one application has been received will be held on June 4th in Dunedin. Tbe body of a man was found at the Ocean Beach on Wednesday. On its removal to tha Hospital it was identified as that of James Barnet.t by the deceased's sister, with whom he lived in Castle street. He complained of being unwell >n the morning, weat out for a walk, and was last seen about 9 am. on the Queen's Drive. About 11 o'clock some perrons training dog* on the bea n h, opposite tbe Racecourse Hotel, found tbe body lying on the beach, but it had evidently beea in the water. The coat and hat of the deceased were lying some distance off. 1 Barnett, who wa* 38 years of age, is stated to have-been drinking heavily for some time past. The fourth anniversary of the Kailway Employed Benefit Society was celebrated by a social reunion, consisting of a concert and ball, in the Temperance Hall on the 16th. There was ,'a very large attendance, the hall ' being crowded. Mr William Conyers, the Commissioner of Railways for the Middle Island, presided, and Messrs Grant and Armstrong, also occupied seats on the platform. The Chairman delivered a short opening speech, in which he expressed his sense of gratification at bring present and observing thac the Society was in such a rroHperou*>condition. When the Society was started in 1875 it had only 100 members, and its membership had gradually increased to 340, including the membera of tho Oamaru branch. The invested capital of the Society was now LIOOO. The Government had det«r-, minfd that in future all joining the service should become members of the Society, and at tbe present time there were 100 applications for membership. He considered it necee* sary that all railway employes should ' become members of such a society, and very c< rdially congratulated the member* upon the success which bad attended their organisation. The musical portion of the programme consisted of selections by the Railway Band, and of a number of solos. Messrs Ibbotecn. Packer, Denovan, Little, Mr H. Jones, ana Miss Jennings and Miss T. Jennings, were the vocalists, and the singing was fully appreciated. Mr Denovan gave two comic recitations —" The Irish Schoolmaster " and " A Lecture on Astronomy "—and was enthusiastically, ap-, plauded. After the concert the room wad' i cleared, and a numerously-attended ball con*" eluded the proceedings. ' " During last we?k 110 daymen employed on the Tapanui branch railway, between- the Pomahaka crossing and the end of the line, were discharged by the contractors, yiho are now devoting their attention to pushing on the lower portion of the line in order to get over the mountainous part, of the route ,be« , fore spring. At the Waipahi end the tunnel formation and bridges will be completed in tit. or eight weeks, and all that will then remain to be done will be the laying of the rails before the line can be opened on the plains. Nearly all the timber and ironwork for the bridges v on the ground, and a large number of sleepers have been delivered, or are in the bush. The tunnel will be finished in about six weeks, so that it appear* quite probable tbe line will b« ready for traffic by the first of January next. The annual meeting of the North Dunedin Rifles was held on Wednesday at the Diillshed, North Dunedin. At tbe drill inspection the followine numbers mustered : 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, 1 sub-lieutenant, 5 sergeants, 1 bugler, and 37 rank and file. At the after meeting Capf anC. S. Reeves presided. He was happy to say that the Company was in a more flourishing condition tban it was 12 months ago. He congratulated the Company on the very creditable appearance it presented at both of tbe Volunteer demonstrations held in this part of , rbe Colony during the patt year — the first at Forbury Park, on November 9, 1878, and the sacond at Invercargill, several weeks ago. Without in any way wishing to natter the Company, he had no hesitation in expressing his belief that there was not a steadier company present at the Invercargill Review. He need not refer to the cases in which come other Volunteers had disgraced the cloth at th»t review, and he hoped that if such conduct were repeated the offenders would not be allowed to wear Volunteer uniform any more. The financial statement showed that at the end of the year there wss a balance in the bat»k of L 53, but since then the new uniforms had been purchased, and this left a Valance of only Lll: The following officers were then appointed for the ensuing year :— -Secretary, Volunteer John Dalziel (vice Volunteer Bonner, resigned) ; treasurer, Corporal T. Hutchinson (reelected) ; committee— commissioned officerp, Seigeant Richardson, Volunteers A. Hunter, M'Gruer, W. Hutcbinson, and J. S. Wilson ; auditor 5 , Colour sergpant Cherrie and Volunteer Wilkinson ; shootm? committee, commissioned officers and Sergeant Richardson. The news of Victoria's requirements in tbe wheat line (says the Oarcaru Mail) must neceissrily have a stimulating effect on local value*, because, although it may be urged that Adelaide has a large wheat surplus, which will ho at once put forward to the outlet opened up by the demand in Victoria, still we see' no reasm why Oamara should not compete favourably with Adelaide even in Melbourne markets. We notice from cablegrams that Adelaide wheat is firm in Sydney at 6s per bushel. Now tbe-e is no import duty in Sydney, and the cost of sending grain from Adelaide to Melbourne would not be much Jess than that of tending grain from here to Melbourne. The Adelaide exporter, who can gfit 5$ in Sydney, would require to get from 5s <kl to 6a in Melbournp, on account of the export duty theie. and thia would mean about 4a 9d for New Zealand wheat in tho same market, or 4s to tbe exporter here. Well, this would be a decided relief, after the low prices nnd slack demand wliich have hitherto obtained. We notice alfo from London cablegrams that tlio wheat maiket is fiimer, New Zealand bu"ng qU' te<l at 4Si per quaiter. This, with the Ute advances in wool, and the pre?ent firm ctmlition of that commodily in tbe London inaiket, se<ni to point to a ievivalof the trade in tbe staple products of this Colony. The troop-sHp Clyde, it appears from tbe ' Cape papers, " was totally wrecked when on the voyage from England to Natal. She touchf dat TaHe Bay on March 31* t, and left on April 2ijd, but on tbe 3rd was wrecked iff Dyer's Island. The troops and all batch* wert safely landed, but the munitions of vtjur M) 4 cargo went down with the ship,"

■ 'At'the meeting of the Waste Lands Board " on Wedneßday, Mr George Watson applied for a license to prospect jfor antimony over a section in the district of Hyde, previously held under license by the Ota^o Antimony Mining Company. — Mr Donglts, It gal manager of the Company referred to, s*id there were some 10 shareholders in the old Company, but although not wound up, ie was virtaally out of existence. Some of those former shareholders were dead, some bickniDt, and the others were men without means. The present application was made on behalf of m-n of means, who would be prepared to go on with the work. — The Chairman of the Board said the former Company were four years' rent in arrear, some Ll4O being due. — Mr Douglas gave no hopes ot this sum being obtained. — Tbe Chairman then stated that the Beard had the power of cancelling the lease in consequence of the r«nt being in arrear, but under the new Act they had no power to grant a fresh leave. r The present applicant would require to applyin terms' 'of tbe Mines Act to the Warden,of the Hindon district;.— The Board agreed to cancel the lesyae to the former Company, and Mr Watson' intimated his intention of preferring his application to the Warden. It ia tj be hoped that the result will be a vigorous attempt to work the deposits of antimony known to exist in the Hyde district, in a payable manner. At the annual meeting of the South Australian auxiliary to the London Missionary Society, held at Adelaide on the 7th inhtant, the Jttev. James Chalmers, the New Guinea missionary, as reported by the. Register, made the following suggestion respecting the exploration of the island :—" What he would suggest to any Government that was sufficiently enterprising to explore New Guinea wouU be this— to appoint a man who understood travelling and give him a thorough staff of scientific men, get carriers irom the South Pacific Islands, and land the party at Port Moresby, back them well with money, and then New Guinea would be explored, and the civilited word would s know of itk If we had only in these colonies a man like Bennett, of New York, who would .say to a man like Stanley — ' Stanley, there is New Guinea ; explore it thoroughly ; ■ find out everything there is to be found about 1 it!' He thought if any man were enterpri«Dg enough to do that be might safely predict thac the "expenses of the expedition would be all recouped 'by the knowledge that would be gained,, and the curiosities of various kinus in : natural history and other valuable stores that would be brought back. Be would not trubt c the native camera. If any exped.tion of the kind should ever be undertaken by an Australian colony he would strongly advise to get , a man who would not be afraid of the natives rr-not a man who, if he saw a spear raised, would follow the tuo frequent practice of 'up ' fiflo and down native. 1 It was far better to go amongst such people unarmed, for by tuab means their, confidence was secured." A considerable quantity of wheat arrived by rail in Dunedin on Wednesday. The goods traffic < oa the line is now quite as large as the department can overtake with the means at their dUposal. Two additional looom»tives, which have jut been landed, are being fitted up in the railway yard, and wilt soon be ready fur use. Tue larga turntable for locomotives, near Rattray street, ia no w In use, and will facilitate the work of " the department. It is expected that,t«nders will be called for tbe new Lunatic Asylum buildings at Seaclilf • within a fortnight. Mr R. A. Lawson, arobi- • teot, is 'now busily preparing the plans and specifications. With reference to sec' ion 3, block XII, Crookston district, an intending applicant waited upon tho Land Board on Wednesday, to aik'upon whatground the above section had peen " withdrawn fcvm sale. Tne Chairman Baid a ' letter had been received fromjJMr J. Mooney, of Tapanui, stating a petition was beir>g signed in tbe district to withhold the section from sale, as .being suitable for a camj-iog-ground, and for the future site of a towuship. The Board had therefore withdrawn the sejtioit in the interest of the public. The applicant; said be did not know Mr Mooney, and there wai no petition 1 going through the district. The fact was the 1 section was between private propeity, the owner ;.'of which was at the bottom of gdtting it rei Served from sale. The section had been adver- , ( tised as open- for application that day, and , , applicants had been at some expense going to gee it, &c, and to have it withdrawn at the ast moment was a decided injustice. The Board agreed that, one of iheir rangera should be employed to make all necessary inquiries, and if it were found Mr Mooney had ' led the Board astray, the section ■ would- be leopened for application, It was at 'last week's meeting the decision was arrived at to withdraw the section, which up to that time had been adverted for applicationNo petition has been received by the Board re. , lative to the section. Donald M'Donald, charged under the Frau- * dulent Debtors Act with fraud and false representation, was on Wednesday committed for ' trial. Mr Watt, R.M., considers that a prima . facie case has been made out.

' ' A man named Ben. Charles, residing at Cambrian, sustained a fracture of the leg the other day, through a kick from a horae. As Dr - Allen has left the district, patients at Uambrians have to procure medical aid from Clyde orNaseby.

Our Cambrian correspondent informs us '' that snow was falling there a week ago. At the City Police Court on Wednesday Mr Timothy Hayes, publican, of Kensington, was proceeded against under the Licensing OrJi- " nance for selling a pint of beer iv his hotel oa -Sunday, the 11th instant, to a person who was neither a honafide traveller nor a lodger in the housa. Mr Calian, who appeared for the defendant, admitted the offence, which, ho vever, he pleaded, had bean committed under , .extenuating circumstances. It appeared that on. the Sunday evening referred to several ", friends met at the def endant'd house, one of Whom f eaueated to be supplied with a glaes of beer. r His request was complied with,* and the circumstance being communicated to the police, an information was laid against tha publican. Mr Callan submuted that the system , of refusing to supply drinks on Sundays was one that was more honoured in the breat-h than in the observanca. In fact, it was almost impossible for this iujunction, of the Legislature to be carried out in its in- . tegrifey, and he could not understand why , -Mr.Hayea had been selected as a scapegoat for , an offence that was being constantly committed both in the city aud suburbs. 'Inspector Mallard objectad to this Btatemenfc. If Mr Callan would give information as to the offenders ' ;to' whom he alluded, he (Mr Mallard) would only' be too happy to proceed sgainst them. So f «r as he was aware, the practice did not exist.' Mr Callau said that for bia part he ..would never dream of giving information to the police in cases of this kind, because he did npt believe that it was leally any offence to sell liquor on Suudays The Bench evidently • thought it was an offence, for tbe defendant was fined 1$ and costs— L3 ]$ in ali,

Some time since (says the Melbourne Herald) we referred to the agitation which had commenced in England for the establishment of a "State Parcel-post," aad showed that; such an institution was in operation in several European countries. It was pointed out tbat public con venience required some such institution in Victoria. No step in tbat direction, however, has yet been taken by the Postal ny Railway Departments. In the meantime, private enterprise has come to the rescue, and there is every probability that th 3 new carrying company launched under the directorship of the Hon. Henry Cuthbert, Mr Andrew Lyell, MP., Mr J. Permewan, and Mr John E. Wright, will supply a waut which has long been felt amongst those who have to send parcels and packages up-country, when the loc&litie* to be reached are beyond tbe range of the ra'lway stations, Tho new company proposes to purchasd the stock, property, imd goodwill of the catr}iog business of Mes*rs Permewan, Wright and Co., and with a capital of LIOO,OOO, extend its operations throughout Victoria and the adjacent Colonies. The old firm keeps its capital in the business in tha form of share?, and guarantees 12£ per cent, to shareholders. The idea is to establish a cheap and expeditious system of sending parcels and merehandis9 to any part of the Colonies Up to the pretent time the company, which is to be merged in the new enterprise, has been paying about 17 per cent. profit, and its branches since 1872 have increased from three to 21, whilst, with tbe constantly-increasin? railway extension, new branches are required wherever selection ia going forward, or new centres of population formed. Enterprises of tbia kind deserve encouragement, inasmuch as they tend to cheapen the coat of carriage to tin general public, and to add to popular convenience in a direction in which the State bai not yet seen fit to commence business.

" Mr Edward Treuerry," states the Ballarat, Star, " is not idle in Eogland, nor forgetful of his Australian adventures and projects. He has recently sent out pamphlets with map*, developing a schema for a railway from Deuiliquin to the Gulf of Carpentaria, with branches connecting with all the colonies of this continent, and he offers to be one of a syndicate of 10 to pu^ down LIOOO each for rreliminary expenses in getting Colonial Enabling Bills and grants of every alternate 12£-mile-6quara block of land on the trunk line. His viiwa as to the grandeur and tbe certain success of ,tbe scheme are very pronounced, and he holds that. Booligal, on the delta of the Lachlau and the Mucrumbidgee, is bound to be ' the Chicago of these' colonies.' "

A. pretty little service of song, entitled " Pilgrim's Progress," was held at the South Dunediu Presbyterian Ohuich on the 2lst. There was a good attendance, and the entertainment passed off very satisfactorily.

A few clays ago Warder Wood?, at the Pentridge Stockade, while searching for articles of contraband at a spot where a gang of prisoners are at work during the day, discovered conceded underground a large swag, contain ing 175 figs of tobaco.). Thi* article of luxury, so highly prized by prisoners, was made up in separate parcels, with tho names of the prisoners for whom they were intended, but the names were fictitious. There were also a number of letters giving information about discharged comrades, and topics of the day.

We take tbe following miniog news from the Tuapeka Times :— " The Golden Fleece shaft is down 250 feet. They have gone a consider, able distance .throug blue c .meat, but have not bottomed yet. The work has been done by the men actin? independently of outside aid. This is highly creditabla to them, and we hope will receive a commsnsurats roward. — The Dauntless has bottomed the second shaft at 134 feet, showing a good-looking wash. They intend immediately driving on the reef.— At the St. LawreLce claim (quartz-reef) they have been busy for some time stripping casing off, and are now engaged blasting down the quanz, which shows a good face of about two and a-half fe*t of solid reef. A share has been sold to Mr Spsnca at a Falisfactory price. — One-sixteenth share of the Young Ireland claim has been purchased by Stony and Arbuckle. — The Deny Walk shaft is down 290 feet, and will be down to the depth of 300 feet this week. They do not expect to bottom at that depth. They have been passing through brown cement; now it is grey and comiotron to blae, with some gold in it. — At the Wetberstones claim, Mr Gascoigne fays they are ' wiring in ' with most satisfactory results. He showed our reporter a small piece of oment with several pieces of goli just, brought from the working. — The Black Horse' party are down 50 feet in the third hundred."

The Ohrißtchurch exprees now arrives at what is best known a 9 the old platform at the Dunedin station. This now arrangement ha 3 been in existence only a few daya.

All the pipes in connection with the Silverstream water supply scheme, from Princes street to the reservoir, have been laid by the contractors — Messrs Proudfoot aud Mackay. When two or three slips in tue race have been repaired, the water will be let into the mains.

A special meeting of the Harbour Board wan held on the. 15th inst., when it was resolved to write to the Government pointing out that the public works below high- water mark were being carried out without the Board having been communicated with, and requesting that such a proceeding should not be regarded a1)a 1 ) a precedent 1 , although in the present case the Board did not desire to raise any objection.

Loitering upon footpaths in such a way as to cause hindrance to traffic thereon, is now a punishable offence under the new Dunedin City bye-laws, and we hear the police have received instructions to put the law in motion against offenders all aud sundry.

When Mr Sheeban was la3t here (remarks tbe Oamaru Mail) he visited the Uppsr Waitaki district to investigate the Native claims to land which had caused so much trouble to certain of tbe landholders there. After a long " kortro," the Natives haviug failed to tstablish' their claims, Mr Sheeban very properly warned them to retire to their settlements on the West Coast, and informed them that if they failei to acb ia obedience to his request, they would be rein >vei by force. The offenders remained quiet for some time, but the effects of their fright having worn off through effluxion of time, they ara c .rnmencing their old pranks. Not ofily are their dogi t efc to worry sheep, but they have taken forcible posseFsijn of a rortion of Mr Sutherland's run. which has in consequence been rendered uselass for his purposes. Apart from the loss that is accruing to Mr Sutherland in consequence of this Maori invasion, it is not pleasant to have to live amongst a host of freebooters, whose depredations will grow no le3B serious through non-interference. We do not intend to blame Mr Sheehan for what, has occurred. He was indefatigable and intelligent in his treatment of thm minor "Native difficulty" when bere._ No mau could have done more than he did, and' few would have done as much. He is now engaged in the arrangement of important Native business in tin far North, or a telegram would have bui.n sufficient to ensure his immediate fttyention to i/\ia rnaUor. There is but one

method of treating these Natives that would prove effective. It is easy enough to send them to their West O >ast settlements ; but, although it was at first thougit that, ones removed, they would not return, experience has proved to the eontruy If Europeans invaded ihe property of o'hew they would be ejected by force and punished # We would deal mor i leniently with these gemi-savagea^ But if they persisted in retaining possession of other people's pr iperty, after repeated warnings, they should be treated in a manner that they and their kind would not soon forget.

The Southland Times records the death of pensioner Sergeant Michael Brennan, late of the old 95 h Biiga-le, at the advanced age of 73 This brave s ldier served always on the staff of hi 3 rrgiment while it wan in tbe field throughout the memorable actions in the Penia6uU up ti the victory at Waterloo and tho occupation of Paris.

Mr A. H. Ross was on Monday e'ected witho it opposition to represent Htgu Ward iv the City Council, vice Mr R. H. Leary, resigned.

At a sitting of the Supreme Court in Bankruptcy on Monday, E. A. M'Keuzia obtained his final order ot discharge, and leave to examine witnesses in the case of William and Ed war J D»wnss (debtors) was obt lined. _ The other bus.njss brought before the Registrar was adj )umed.

Some days ago (says the Southland Times) ouc reporter was made aware of a most inexplicable circumstance said to have happened at Riverton. At that time, for various reasons, no mention was made of the affair, but as the occurrence has been made public through other sources, we now publish the information supplied to us by a gentleman who should be well informed anent the matter. It seems that on Tuesday last a small k^tch called the Rambler was lying at the Riverfcon Jetty loading for Orepuki. Included in the goods taken on board were several barrels of beer, bearing the brand of a well-known firm of bre-vers. Through some reason or auother one of these casks burat, aad in addition to the ale, several cakeß of tobacco, and the entire entrails of some animal, of what kind does not appear to bs thoroughly known, were exposed to view. Several persons were on the wharf at the time, and were the beholders of the circumstance. We have been given to understand by a gentleman from Riverton that tbe matt-sr has been placed in the bands of the police authorities, and it is to be hoped for the sake of all parties that the affair may be sifted to the bottom. It is only baie justice to the firm whosa brand the barrel bore, to state that the bbare a r did not come from their establishment, aud that they are considerably annoyed, and not a littte disgusted, that a cask containing tuch concoctions should emanate from their brewery. Those who have had any experience in the brewing lioe will readily conceive how easily such a thing might happen, as barrels from other firms aie continually being received in the yard and sent out again without the brand being eliminated. As a matter of fact, it U known that tbe firm in question have sant no beer to Orepuki for some years past. Matters are now practically in abeyance, awaiting the arrival of the Rambler from Orepuki.

Mr W. A. Murray, M.H.R. for Bruce, and MrG. M'Lean, M.H.R. for Waikouaiti, will address their constituents shortly.

At a meeting of theJWorks Committee of the Harbour Board on Saturday, it was decided that the steamer Iron Aga should be fitted with new engines and a new propeller. These improvements, it is undertt Jod, will make the steamer a powerful and useful tug.

Portion of the privileges in connection with the Queen's Birthday Race Meeting wore sold by auction by Messrs Wright, Stephenson, and Co. on Saturday. Of the publicans' booths, Mr Matbe^on (Kaikorai Hotel) bought Nob. 1 and 2 for L 7 KM; Mr S. Mayo (Robert Burns Hotel) paid JL.I9 10s for Nos. 3 to 8, and L 6 10s for the refreshment booth ; the right to sell fruit went to Mr Elliott for L 2 lOd ; Mr Lamer secured the caids at L 8 10s ; and Mr Powell got the stabling for LI. The grand stand booth was let by the Club to Mr R. T. Waters by tender. Including the last-mentioned, the privileges this year brought L2l more than, last.

The members of the Port Chalmers Mechanics' Institute and Athenaeum held their annual meeting on the 16th inst. The report of the retiring Committee aud Treasurer's balance-sheet were read and adopted, and the following officers were elected for the ensuing year, viz : — President, Mr Elder ; vice-presi-dent, Mr R. Dick ; hon. secretary, Mr E G. Allen ; hon. treasurer, Mr A. Leek ; committee—Messrs Cameron, Monson, Drysdale, J. Mil, Downes, Ritchie, Leckie, Sutherland, and J. B. Taylor. A vote of thanks to the Chairman terminated the business of the evening.

The sale of the Harbour Board leases, which was to have been conducted by Mr Montagu Pym on Saturday afternoon, was postponed, it having been discovered that two months notice cf the sale should have been given.

The steamer basin at thejside of the Rattray street Wharf is being now dredged. This work was commenced on the 15th ms\, and it is expected it will be completed within a fortnight. The baain is to be dredged to such a depth, tbat any of the vtssels which come up to Duuedin will ba able to swing in it at low tide. Tne dredged matorip.l will be deposited, by means of a crans with a loDg jib, to the left side of the Rattray street exteusion.

The audience at the Princess Theatre on Sunday was agaiu limited by the size of the building, and Mrs Hardinge-Britten delivered one of the most pleasing of hf-r orations, on the subject of " Man, Spirit, and Angel." At the close of the lecture a number of questions were asked and answered. In reply to one she admitted tbat she had had proot of the existence of disembodied spirits, and that, the circumstances connected with the manifestations referred to were published. It was announced that the subject of next Sunday evening's lecture will be selected by the audience.

A conference between the Commissioner of Eailways for the Middle Island (Mr Wm. Cocyers), the General Manager of Otago Railways (Mr Grant), and the Chairman of the Otago Harbour Board (Mr H. Tewaley), was held on Saturday last regarding the permauent rail-way-station site at Dunedin. The conference was private, but we understand that the question was very fully considered, and that Messrs Conyers and Grant agreed to recommend tbe adoption of a plan which Mr Tewsley considered would protect the interests which it is the duty of the Harbour Board to conserve.

Tho May number of the Illustrated New Zealand Herald, just published, contains a likeness of His Excellency Sir Hercules Robinson, a lively sketch of a rabbit battue in Victoria, L'Eatrango's late balloon ascent, a view of the Melbourne Auuual Regatta, Bendigo in 1853, and other illustrations of Colonial life and scenery.

There are one or two misprints in Mrs Britten's article upon the Dunedin Industrial School. In tho ninth line of tho seventh paragraph, " Kind of marching boots," should road "Thud of," fa,

Cr Ross, the newly-elected repres ntative of High Ward in the City Council, may certainly be congratulated on tbe first notice of motion he bai i>)ac d upon tae orcier-p iper. He, on Tuetday gave nova ot his intention t'> w<fve at thanex& uieefciug of the Coiucil — " Tna& imnvadiaio Bteps bd tak^n to |*ui> the old cemetery m the juncioa ut Ratt ay street anJYoik place in a inorough state ot repair." This is a matter to which we have more thaa ones called attention, for in our opinion the condition of the old cmetery bas long been a standing disgraca to the citizens of Dunedin.

It U understood that Mr Vincent Pyke, M.tTR., will be invited to turn tho first sod of the Otago Central Railway, for the conBtruction of which he has been an indefatigable advocate.

Mr George Grant, secretary to the local committee of the Sydney International Exhibition has asked the City Cuuncil to bear pait of the expense of furnishing die Exhibition with a Sdries of lar^e-sized photograph* of Dunedia and iti immedia.e neighbourhood. /He proposes to have oue set, ot not less than 15 ViOWtf, scut to the Sydoey Exhibition ; a s^ond t j the Melbourne Exhibitim ; and a third for hanging in our new Tovvn Had. On the morion of Cr Isaac, tha sum of LSO was voted for carrying out the proposal j and the arrangement of other details was left to the Finance Committee.

A letter from Mr William Wilsoc, of Newbank Villa, Hanover street, on the tubjecc of the city savvage, was read at>the Council meeting on Tuesday. He coinplaiued that his property was rendeiel next to valueless through large quantities of decomposed matter beiug constantly washed up to his very door, The letter w<ia referred to one of the coinojvtees to be dexit vvith. CrJFish took ihe op,j< rtuuity of expiesaing his op niou tuat it was hi^a time that ins sewage queitiou was grappled with ia earnest. It appeared co him t jvc tho C <uuci were only atavmg oft' the evil day, and io was his intention to put a motion on tha noticepaper. The Council would have to go to Parliament and borrow money to deal with the matter propsrly, but it waa better they should do that tUan have the city a hjobed of disease. Cr Itaac taid therj was not the slightest doubt tuat the Council had n:glected this matter too long. He did not wish to alarm tue citizens, but he understood that typhjid foyer pra vailed to a large extant ia the city at the present time.

A book entitled " Old Identities ; or the First Decade in the History of the Province," will be issued shortly by iVltssra Mil.s, l)icic, and Co. it will consist of 30J pages, and the author is well acquainted with all tue cLcumstetneej in conneccion with the foundation and growth of Otago.

A locomoiiiva i^ being constructed at Messrs Davidson and Co.'s foundry for Guthrie and Larnach's New Zealand Woodware Company. The engine is of 30 horse-power, and is to be used in drawing timber out of the bush to one of the company's milk near InrercargilL Tae locomotive has 12 wheels, and is 22 feet in length. At the same works an iron surf-boat, 39 feat by 10 fees be.un, with a depth of six feat, and a small portable engine and boiler, are being made for tbe Timaru Board of VV'i.rka. JFor the Richmond Hill Gold-mining Company a small battery, consisting of 10 head of stampers, is also in progress.

A deputation consisting of Messrs Blackie, Godso, N. Halt, Blanck, Jeaningi, andMouat, representing Ravensbourne and other districts, waited upon. Mr Couyars, the Commissioner or Railways for the Middle Inland, on Saturday afternoon, and urged that a late train should be run nightly to Port ChalmfciM, calling at intermediate stations. Mr Conyers, after hearing the deputation, intimated that he considered the request was one which, if practicable, should be complied with, and that he was favourable to the proposal that a train should leave Dunedin daily at 11 p.m. for Pore Chalmers and call at intermediate stations. He would, ho said, confer with Mr Grant on the subject, as he knsw that a night train would be a great boon to the rejidents of Ravensbourne and of other townships on the line.

Mr W. M. Bolt, of this city, was the recipient of a pleasing testimonial in the form of a purse of 21 guineas on Friday evening last. 1c appears that Mr Bolt has been instrumental ia getting up a number of interesting lectures in Dunedin, and his friends resolved to pay this tribute to his eaergy and zeal in the cause of knowledge.

Tuesday's Timaru Herald says : — " We were yesterday shown several capital photographs, by Messrs Coxhead and Sergeant, of the huge piles of grain now tacked oa Mesra P. Cunningham and Co.'s premiss, comprising in all some 50,000 sacks. We understand that copies of these photographs are to be sant to the Sydney Exhibition, and they will go far towards giving foreigners an i lea of our wonderful resources."

A general order (says the Auckland Herald) has been issued from the headquarters of the Armed Constabulary, at Wellington, intimating tha.t in future all members of the civil police (commissioned officers excepted) are to wear numbers over the crown of the new double-peaked caps. We presume this new rule is to enable some of the general public to know the number of the non commissioned officer or constable when it may notba convenient to ascerUin his name. Colonel Read ■r, the Under-Secretary for Defence, gets the credit of thi3 new order of things.

I hope (-ays " Atlas," in the World) that no international objections will be raised against the interesting experiment which Menotti Garibaldi, with three thousand of his countrymen, i<j about to tiy on the bouth coast of New Guinea. He wants to start there an Italian colony, or rather a British colony of Italian emigrants, under the name of Italia. Thirty million lire have already been subscribed towards the scheme ; four steamers are to be charter* d ; enthusiastic adhesions are pouring iv fiou) all quarters of the Peninsula. Nobody but skilled artisans are to be adnaittad, whilst the most improved machinery of every kind will be provided. I have little doubt that the venture will prove, at least industrially, a complete succeufi. Italians, as a rule, are excellent settlers, aud I have never seen one, either ia E^ypt, Australia, South or North America, Asia, and I may add, Great Britain, who was not a thriving or useful membsr of the community.

The master of the schooner SUuley, which recently arrived at Levuka, has reported to the Fiji Times an unprovoked attack made on the vessel by the natives of Savo. Tae Stanley had weighed anchor, and as there was no wind she was being towed by the boats. The account proceeds : — " When about 300 yards from shoie the natives commenced firing. They are well supplied with guns, many having Sniders. At first wa took no notica, Ihinkiuar ir, a little playful amusement. We were soon undeceived. Tae balh began to whistle pa^ ouc hoads, ona passing 1 unpleasantly close lo tbe mate's ear ; others struck the ship, and one broke a parallel ruler on the table in the captain's cabiu. Thert) wa* no cause given for this attack. Tha Savo natives are the great wanjors of these parts j they are a terror £o ajl

the surrounding islands. I presume' that thei* euccease* have made them so self-confident that they thought they would try what they coi Id do with the white man. There Is a lxrge> number of Queensland returns among them, aad maay cau speak English fluently."

AcorresponcLnt of au English paper writes :— " I remember a btory related by a friend of mine who was travelling accidentally with one of the numerous Liliuutiau Serene Highnesses with whom Germany is blessed. Tt appear* that on their arrival at some hotel on thujPhme they had to write their names in the visitor* book, and, to his gie vt a^t mlihrnent, my friend caw his Sereue companion put down, not hi* own, but my friend's name, condescendingly whispf ring : ' I suppose you won't mind— the truth is, 1 wish to travel incognito.'—' Not at all,' replied my friand j 'it's just what I mean doing myself ;' and, taking the pen, he wrote iv the hook, ' His Serene Highness the Prince of XXX,' the other's name, observing, with a smilt", ' Now we ara both incog.'

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News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 1435, 24 May 1879

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