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CRICKET IN ENGLAND.

Important matches have been numerous during the month, as is usual at this season, but after the "Canterbury week," at the beginning of next month, the game will be le»s noticed. I mentioned in my last the first of the series of three matches between Gentlemen and Players, and which resulted in a draw in favour of the amateurs. They were the winners of the two succeeding matches — in the one case by an innings and 98 runs, and in the other by five wickets. The Gentlemen's score foi their one innings in the second match of the series was 449, of which Mr W. G. Grace made 169, and Mr A. W. Ridley 163. The scoring in the third match \v as poor. Surrey v. M. C. 0. , which used to be such a grand match in byegone days, was played at Lord's on July 10th and 11th, and resulted in a narrow victory for the county by 27 runs. The match Middlesex v. Notts, played at Prince's on July 11th to 13th, was noteworthy for the display of splendid cricket and its sudden and melancholy termination. Middlesex scored 173 and 220, of which Mr C. J. Ottaway scored 15 and 106. The first innings of Notts produced 339, of which Daft contributed 82 in faultless style, and in the second innings 10 runs had been made for the loss of one wicket, when the ground-keeper, Box, after attending to the telegraph board, was attacked by disease of the heart, and died in three minutes, in consequence of which further play was abandoned. Box was a crack player in his day, and one of the best wicket-keepers that ever put on the gloves. Lancashire was beaten by Yorkshire at Sheffield by 18 runs, the match being pulled out of the fire for the " Tykes " by Hill, who in the second innings of the Lanca shire took five wickets in six overs, at a cost of three runs. Sussex beat Kent at Brighton by 58 runs, thanks to the batting of Charlwood, who i^ade 40 and 133. The Eton and Harrow match was played at Lord's on July 14th and 15th, and resulted in a hollow victory for the former team by an innings and 24 runs. The total scores were— Eton, first innings, 308 (W. F. Forbes, 113 ; L. Bury, 72) ; Harrow, first innings, 157; second innings, 127. H. F. Blame, with 16 and 39, was top scorer for the Harrovians. The attendance on the ground was greater than ever, and the rows of carriages were six deep. Among the visitors were the Prince and Princess of Wales and the King of Greece (or King of the Hellenes, as he is officially styled, with nauseous pedantry. The visitor who attracted most notice, however, was a plenipotentiary from Morocco, with a suite of swarthy Moors. At Nottingham on July 17th to 19th there was another North v. South match for the benefit of Daft. The Southerners won by eight wickets owing to the batting of Mr W. G. Grace, who made 16 and 114, not out.^ Mr Grace, as will be seen from the foregoing notes, has been making up for his small scores earlier in the season, H« surpassed himself, however, In a match at Grimsby, against 22 of that town. His eleven (the United South of England) went in first, and Mr Grace stayed in for two days and a half, and carried his bat at the last for a score of 400 runs ! Mr W. 8.. Gilbert supported him with 116, and the total of the innings was 681. Twelve of the twenty-two were disposed of for 88 runs, and the match was then left unfinished, for want of time to play it out Mr Grace's performance has only once been beaten, viz., by Mr E. F. S. Tylecote, in a match against Clifton College in 1868, when he made 404.

Mustangs v. American Horses. — A fifty-mile match for $500 between American and mustang horses came off at Belmont Park, Philadelphia, on Saturday, June 17 ; Mr Frank Heidie, of that city, matching ten American horses against the same number of mustang ponies belonging to Captain Roticker's Californian troup. Lloyd Williams rode the American horses, and Mr Smith, a Oalifornian, the mustangs. The latter won the match by three furlongs, he doing the fifty miles in 2 hours 20 minutes 55 seconds.

Cambridge Rowers. — The four oarsmen from the First Trinity Boat Club of Cambridge, England, arrived in America per steamer Britannia. A number of representative American oarsmen met them at the pier, and escorted them to the Fifth Avenue Hotel. The names of the visitors are — J. T. Penrose, stroke ; W. B. Close, 2; G. L. N. Mann, 3; A. Jameson, bow ; and S. A. Walker, substitute. They had a pleasant voyage, and think it has done them much good. They are not a University crew, but are from one club in one college of the University. Trinity has three boat clubs, and these men are from the largest. Mr Close is an Englishman, Jameson, Scotch ; Mann, Welsh ; and Penrose, Irish. They are a fine set of fellows, and look able to pull a killing race. Their average weight is 157 pounds. Mr Close has had great experience, having rowed in more than 80 races. He is president of the Cambridge University Boat Club, and was one of the crew of the Oxford- Cambridge race this year and last. Penroae is a blonde, and also has no lack of experience. He has pulled stroke in many college races ; so also have the other two. The crew have never rowed as a four, although three of them have had positions in the Bame boat. Close is a superb single sculler, and will doubtless enter in the Bingle scull contests, The men left for Philadelphia on Monday. They do not intend to go in for training until some two weeks before the races. They are expected to give a good account of themselves.

The Owner cut Kisber. — The fortunate owner of Kisber, winner of the Derby and Grand Prix de Paris, Mr Baltazzi, is one of four brothers, the sons of a gentleman having a good position and an honorable name among the mercantile magnates of Turkey and the Levant. He has been barely more than four or five years settled in this country, and about the same period his colours have been seen on the turf. Born in Turkey in 1850, Mr Baltazzi was educated at Rugby, and thero, it is fair to supposo, imbibed with his English education many of those English sporting tastes which a public school does so much to encourage. Returning for a while after the completion of his Rugby coiuolu to Constantinople a.iid "Vienna, lio cai>ie co .England again in Ju'iO, aiici. r.onu became n. ru,nralized amongst us. New market knew him very aoon, and his Btud, placed under the

experienced care of Joseph Hayhoej soon began to furnish winnerß. Melton, too, knew him quite as well as Newmarket, and his hunters were as perfect as money and good judgment could procure. The right hand of fellowship was soon held out to the young foreigners who had so much of Englishman in their composition, besides Mr Baltazzi's quiet manners, combined with his evident keen taste for those sports so much identified with our country, soon gained him recognition and reception among our leading sportsmen. — Baily's London Magazine.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18760930.2.70

Bibliographic details

CRICKET IN ENGLAND., Otago Witness, Issue 1296, 30 September 1876

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1,247

CRICKET IN ENGLAND. Otago Witness, Issue 1296, 30 September 1876

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