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THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER.

A sporting writer in a late Home paper thus describes the race : The scratching of George Frederick for the St. Leger has been anything but favourably received by the public, and I never recollect the withdrawal of a horse from a race exciting so imich bitter feeling. The opposition the horse has met with in the market for such a long time is connected with the result ; but, so far as I can learn, there are no grounds whatever for supposing that Mr. Cartwright had commissioners in the ring laying against George Frederick. Nor can he be reproached with having observed any secrecy in the matter. He is usually a somewhat taciturn man, but on the present occasion he freely accorded permission to the Special Commissioners of The Sportsman and Sporting Life to see the horse in his stable, and it was doubtless owing to their flaming accounts concerning him that he became such a favourite after being almost knocked out. George Frederick went a good gallop over the course on Tuesday, and all went "" merry as a marriage bell " until Sir Fred. Johnstone came into the bettingxooms, at midnight, and fired broadsides into him right and left. As Sir Frederick lad not a book on the race, this looked ominous, but no one was prepared on the following morning to hear that the horse had been struck out. I wired you on Tuesday night that there was a screw loose somewhere, and that I had heard that the horse had a " leg." This proved to be correct, and Mr. Mannington, the well-known V.S., has given a certificate to that effect. Mr. Oartwright, I hear, told a well-known bookmaker that on the following day he should want him to invest £1000 on George Frederick. This information cost the layer dear, as he took on his own account one of the bets of 1600 to 400 that Sir Frederick Johnstone offered that night. There was general consternation on Wednesday morning when it transpired that the horse had been struck out of the race. The information was told us over the breakfast table, and it was melancholy to see the faces of one or two men who had backed him heavily, believing his defeat to be impossible. The owner came in for all manner of maledictions, and there will be a rush for The Sporting Times next Saturday, as it promises its readers a caricature portrait of Mr. Cartwright. After George Frederick had been struck out it might have been anticipated that Apology would have sprung from 6 to 4, but there was a sensation awaiting us with her. "Apology broke down this morning, and won't run," said a wellknown speculator, frantically, as he rushed into my room. As Mr. Dick Swiveller would say, "This was a slaggerer," and my readers may depend upon it I did not make a good breakfast. I at once went down to the betting-rooms, and was in no way comforted by hearing a well-known baronet exclaim, " 1000 to 1 against Apology, and 1000 to 3 for a place, all in ;" "A 'monkey,' she does not run." The betting-rooms at this time presented a scene, of indescribable confusion. Men who had laid odds on George Frederick and Apology against the field were rushing excitedly about, trying to "save" on other horses, and the result was that Atlantic , sprang to 4 to 1, while other candidates jumped to half the price that had been offered against them overnight. Mr. Chaplin, who had taken £5000 to £1000 in one bet, and had other transactions about the mare, accepted four "monkeys" about Lord Falmouth's horse, who gave his backers rare hedging, as did also Trent, weo for a time was as good a favourite as anything. Eventually, however, it transpired that Apology's case was not nearly so hopeless as had been stated. John Osborne, while riding her at exercise in the morning, was observed to suddenly dismount, and, after feeling her legs, had her walked home. It transpired that she had crossed her legs in cantering, and had . grazed one a little. Hot fomentations were applied constantly for two hours, and then the injured part was enveloped in bandages soaked in cold water. Her preliminary canter previous to the race was very eagerly watched, and it was the general opinion that she went short and stiff, and as when the false start took place, she dropped into the rear in a suspicious manner, she went back to 10 to 1 before the actual start took place. With the view of cutting her clown, Boulet was started to make the pace as fast as possible. As a matter of fifct, however, he was playing into the mare's hands, and though she began badly she wanned to her work after going half a mile, and nearing the Rifle Butts she rushed through the ruck and took her place alongside the leaders. Soon afterwards John Osborne brought her to the front, and such a yell as has never been heard in Yorkshire before was raised when it was seen than all her opponents were in trouble, and she came sailing in the easiest winner imaginable. Yorkshire had stood her to a man, and the most extravagant demonstrations of delight were indulged in by her admirers. The only horse in the race from whom it seemed to me that she had anything to fear was Atlantic, who burst a blood-vessel while going like a steam-engine. In commenting on the running at Epsom I remarked how triumphantly George Fredericl: had pulled me through in the Derby, as Atlantic had done in the Two Thousand, and yet that in the St. Leger I should find a horae that woixld

beat them both, naming Apology, and I have thus been enabled to predict the winners of the three great races of the year, and in each case I have discarded the favourite. Two Liverpool speculators are the largest winners on the race —one a backer, the other a layer. The backer is Mr. Luke Barker, who has been wonderfully fortunate this year. His investments in the Micldleham horses have been on such a large scale that the Osbornes found it necessary to take him into their confidence in order to prevent him from spoiling their good "thing." Mr. Whittaker, of Manchester, is also a heavy winner, as is also Mr. Gomm, of the firm of Allsopps & Co., and Mr. Chaplin, Lord Lacelles, and Mr. Vyner, I hear, also throw in for good stakes.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18741128.2.30.1

Bibliographic details

THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER., Otago Witness, Issue 1200, 28 November 1874

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1,090

THE DONCASTER ST. LEGER. Otago Witness, Issue 1200, 28 November 1874

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