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News of the Week.

Mr Campbell's colt Castaway has been scratched for his Christohuroh engagements. The Star of the East Company, Cromwell, have declared a dividend of six shillings per ■hare, The Hon. Major Atkinson has been gazetted a Justice of the Peaca for the Colony. A burning coal-pit near Balolutha has, according to the local paper, been on tire for the last IB months. The amended " Regulations of the Volunteer Force " are publi.Bited in the New Zealand Gazette of the 17th ult. Hares seem to be rapidly increasing in Canterbury. Ten were seen in one day in Hagley Park cricket ground. Our Queenßtown correspondent telegraphs that the yield of the Shotover Terrace Company for the last fortnight was 60 oza. Mr R. Bi Martin has received from Mr J, Davie, M P. 0., the sum pf £10 as a contribution to the funds of the Benevolent Institution. The Oamaru paper, the North Otago Times, is to be issued tri-weekly from the 6th October next, instead of bi-weekly as at present. The tender of Mr. G. O. Clayton for the erection of the station-master's house at Green Island has been accepted. The amount if £325 13s 6d. , An attempt is being made in the Christchurch Municipal Council to do away with tbe £300 a year voted to the Mayor foa official expenses. Mr Wright, of Crieff, a gentleman who has been appointed congregational missionary for Knox Church, has sailed from Glasgow for Port Chalmers. We learn from our Naseby correspondent that Dr Pultney has been engaged by the Hospital Committee and the Loyal Naseby Lodge for one month. The total receipts on the Canterbury Railway for the month of August were £10,620 Is lOd, as against £6667 Us lOd for the corresponding month of 1873. It will be seen by our telegrams that the British expedition for observing the Transit of Venus has arrived at Lyttelton in the ■hip Merope from Plymouth. ■ . We hear that Mr J. A, Reekie, of Totara Park, Anderson's Bay, having purchased Mr James Morris's property, has refused the Bum of £2500 for 32 acres of land. From * private telegram received in town, we leara that a cake of gold weighing 240 ounces has been obtained by the Star of the East Company from 180 tona of stone. On Tuesday, Capt. Hutchison's celebrated mare Miss King dropped a fine brown colt foal to Traducer. Miss King goes this ■eason to Mr Dodsoa's imported horse CasaiYellaunus. A sitting of the Court of Appeal of New Zealand will be held at Wellington on the 9th of November next. There will be a sitting of the Divorce Court at Wellington on November 16th. * We learn from the New Zealand Gazette that Mr T. F. Liddle has been appointed Deputy Harbour-Muster for the port of Moeraki. Mr John Dougall, oi Quarantine Idand, Port Chalmers, has been appointed assistant to the Superintendent of the Quar•atiae Station there.

From the mining districts, we learn that a considerable number of miners have determined to proceed to the Palmer. We understand that a vessel will leave Dunedin direct in a week or two. The City Council met in their new Chamber in the Corporation buildings on Wednesday, for the nrdt time. It is a great improvement on the last chamber both in comfort and appearance. The official notification of tbe appointment of Mr T. A. Mansford, of Port Chalmers, to be Resident Magistrate for the District of Dunedin, appears in the New Zealand Gazette of the 17th ult. The following Chairmen of Boards of Wardens for Depasturing Districts have been appointed : -Mr John M'Hattie, Tuapeka ;Mr Thomas Evans, Waitahuna ; Mr James Ritchie, Waipori. The Rev. Charles Withey, who has been officiating as deacon at Cromwell and the surrounding districts for some time past, will be admitted into the priesthood on Sunday next, at St. Paul's Church. Lemons have been grown at Auckland with considerable success by Mr J. Parker and Mr W. Munro. The Cross is of opinion that it would pay some of the settlers better to grow such fruits than ordinary farm crops. We understand that Mr Thomas Redmayne, an old citizen of Dunedin, is about to leave the Colony for California, and that his friends and well-wishers intend entertaining him at a social meeting at the Masonic Hall. The New Zealand Times, writing of the laudable intention of the ladies of Dunedin to establish a Servants' Home, publishes our report of the preliminary proceedings a guide to the ladies of other cities in he Colony. In our Wellington correspondent's letter, some reference was made to an investigation of some charges against an officer of the Stamp Department. Our telegrams state that the charges have been proved to be without foundation. At a late meeting of the members of the Hokitika Literary Society, it was decided by a majority of 36 to 32, and after a long discussion, that the Reading-room shall in future be kept open from 2 to 6 o'clock on Sunday afternoons. As an instance of the extent to which Wellington is dependent upon Dunedin brassfounders, the New Zealand Times publishes our account of the work lately being done by Messrs A. and T. Burt for the Wellington Water Works. The result of the races for the Doncaster St. Leger, run on the 16th ult., waß telegraphed specially to the Melbourne Argus, the message coming through in aeven hours. The winner was Apology, with LioneßS seoond, and Trene third. The Colonist, in an article on the venomous snakes of India and Australia says, that were reliable information gathered from the whole of India, a gross total of 20,000 human beings succumbing annually to snakebite would probably be the result I The New York Herald, not content with sending (in conjunction with the London Daily Telegraph) an expedition to the centre of Africa, has despatched a party, under the command of Dr. Hayes — a celebrated Arctic explorer — to make a thorough examination of Iceland. We understand that during the approaching cricket season the High School pupils are going to take advantage of an offer made by Mr Hawthorne, the rector, to Becure the services of Mr Paramor, the professional bowler of the Dunedin Cricket Club, as instruotor. The police of Hokitika seem to be among the first to enforce the clauses of the Licensing Act relating to barmaids, Mr Hansen and other hotelkeepers having been summoned for allowing those in their employment to serve in their bars after the hour of 11 p.m. We have to apologise to our readers for the non-appearance this week of the continuation of the story entitled "Brownebrook." The recent heavy weather has caused delay in the transmission of the manuscript, whioh did not arrive in time for publication in the present issue. We are informed by the Secretary of the Post Office. Wellington, that the Mikado whioh left San Francisoo on the 13th inst., brings a mail for New Zealand, consisting of 103 bags. This will be the last mail from England for this colony under the RussellHall contraot. A Chinaman named Low Ket, well known here as a hawker, died rather suddenly yesterday morning. He went to cook his food as usual, and one of the inmates of the house, who entered the kitchen shortly after, found him lying on the ground. He died within half an hour. The two iron steamers to be built, which we described some time ago, are now ia course of construction ; the one for the North at Messrs Sparrow tod Co. 'a new premises on the reclaimed land, and that for tbe Shag River coal trade at Messrs Kincaid, M'Queen, and Co. 'a. Our Taieri correspondent informs us that a man named Tropskey, who was injured in a coach accident in January last at Look-out Point, and who has not been able to work since, has been removed to the Benevolent Asylum. His wife and children are left in most distressing circumstances. We understand that the ketch Glimpse, which was wrecked in last week's gale at Moeraki, though much strained and full of water, now lies in a bend of the roadstead, where she c%nnot sustain much further injury, and that her cargo of railway iion can be landed on the beach without loss. The investigation into the causes, which led to the loss of the seaman James Green overboard, was commenced on board the barque Oneoa on Wednesday by the American Consul, Mr Driver. The proceedings have not been made public. Dodd, the second mate, is still under police surveillance. Mr Bathgate and Capt. Thomson, the Board of Enquiry touching the alleged stranding of the steamer Easby, delivered judgment on Tuesday afternoon. They concluded that the nature of the casualty was not to serious as t» come within the Act, and ordered the captain's and officers' certificates U be returned.

The September number of the Illustrated New Zealand Herald contains several very good illustrations of New Zealand and Victorian scenery. The portraits of the members of the Taamanian Government, however, are bad, and but for the names printed beneath, would scarcely be recognisable. Mr Francis Feilding (says the Tuapeka Times) has sold his runs Nob. 328 and 424, consisting of 50,000 acres leasehold country at Swifczers, together with 1200 head of catfcle, 7500 sheep, 10 head of horses, and working plant for the sum of £11,000, the | purchaser being David M'Kellar, Esq., of Waikaia Plain. A gentleman, who loft this place some months ago, with the intention of digging for gold at Samoa, has returned to New Zealand. He got no gold, and never reached Samoa. It would be well, we believe, if some of our impulsive settlers who are now on the move for the Palmer never reached their destination. An express-driver named Cornelius Regan, committed suicide at Wellington a few days ago by holding his head in a cask of water. The unfortunate man was an express driver, and bore the character of being steady and respectable. He had latterly been despondent because he could not get work hia horse being a bad one and his express waggon j too heavy. The Marlborough Good Templars go in for converting houses as well as individuals. The Express says that "the Good Templars | of Havelock have purohased the old Com mercial Hotel with the intention of oon verting it into a public hall for the use of their own kindred bodies. There could be no better proof that the cause is prospering in that locality." The Anderson's Bay Episcopalian Church ia rapidly approaohing completion, and when finished will supply a great waut which has long been felt in that district. The building ia of wood, and is neat and commodious in its construction. There is a debt of £200 hanging over the Church yet, which it is proposed to remove by subscriptions aud concerts by the choir. A Northern contemporary states that the manufacture of bags from New Zealand hemp has now been comtneaaed at the works of Messrs. Fraaer and Tinne, at the Northern Wairoa. The material is found to be admirably adapted for the purpose, aud those who are now working it up into the humble form of bags are disposed to think that it will be well suited for other textile fabrics of a rough kind. With reference to the visit of a Victorian Cricketing Team to New Zealaud, it will be seen that a large meeting on the subjeot was held at Christchurch on the 24th ult., when the proposal was warmly approved, and a Committee appointed to obtain particulars as to the probable expenses, the subscriptions that could be obtained, and to confer with the Dunedin oricketera on the matter. The following appointments are notified in the New Zealatfd Gazette i— Mr Robert Grigor, Mayor of Balclutha, to be a Justice of the Peace ; Mr Wm< Edward Farra, to be a Licensing Commissioner for the District of Lawrence j Dr John Dryadale, Port Chalmers, to act as a Commissioner to report upon the state and_ condition of immigrants and immigrant ships upon their arrival at that port. We do not often hear of attempts to ao> olimatise the frog. A novel importation (says the New Zealand Times) was noticed at Poverty Bay a few days ago. It was a consignment of sixteen trogs, from Auckland. They arrived safely in a large jar, and originally came from Australia. They are excellent purifiers of water, and their "croak, croak," if rather monotonous, is not uninteresting in "the stilly night." Under the heading " Can't Stand it," the San Francisco Bulletin publishes a long list of grocers and saloon-keepers, with their respective addresses. No explanation is given, and we are left to surmise whether the persons named "couldn't stand" the attacks of the females engaged in the " woman's whisky war," and discreetly caved in, or whether the list is one of insolvents who were unable to stand the pressure of their creditors. An excellent training ground has been formed in close proximity to the Wellington Racecourse. The New Zealand Times says : — " We also have much pleasure in uoticing that the disqualification that has existed against Mr James Day, of Wanganui, for the last seven years, has generously been withdrawn by the present stewards of the W.J.C. There is, therefore, a prospect of witnessing Mr Day's colours again sported at the next meeting." An export Bhed is to be erected on the Railway Station Reserve at the junction of Castle and Rattray streets, and opposite Messrs Driver, Stewart, and Co's store, The building will have a lungth of 300 feet by a width of 60 feet, and will be of timber with iron roof. There will be a line of rails under cover of a verandah, and there are to be two turn-tables near the building. The work is to be completed in four months from date of acceptance of tender. The annual meeting of the Church of England Diocesan Synod was opened on Wednesday with a communion service in St. Paul's. The members of the Synod assembled in the Temperance Hall at 4 o'clock,, when the President (Bishop Nevill) opened the proceedings with an interesting address, which we publish in extenao in another column. In the evening, there was a choral service at St. Paul's, and the Rev. W. Tanner, of Invercargill, preached a sermon. The Wanganui Herald regrets to notice that Mr Millar, F.S. A., has been obliged to file his schedule under the Bankruptcy Act. Mr Millar, several years ago, become a joint security to a Bank, with four others, for a Dunedin contractor for the sum of £1200. Two of his co-sureties are dead, one is in England, and one in Melbourne, Mr Millar alone remainining within reach and responsibility. Mr Millar understood the guaiantee ' to be for one year only to cover a single contract, and never contemplated it was for an indefinite time. Of course he cannot pay if he has not got the wherewithal, and is compelled to place himself under the protection of the Act, The Sank v the only creditor. ;

I In another column will be found a short article on the Palmer rush. Messrs. P. and j R. Anderson, who had been resident for nearly twelve months, and are thoroughly respectable miners, recently arrived here by the s.s. Albion, from Melbourne. They state that they would not advise anyone to pro> eeed to the Palmer, because the alluvial ground has been worked out, and provisions are scarce. Those who wish to try the goldfields should provide their own horseß, and have ample means to purchase "tucker." The San Francisoo News Letter, under the heading "Our Quacks," says that it is a dangerous thing in San Francisco to send for a medical man unless you know who you are sending for. By way of doing a service to the profession and the citizens generally, they publish a list headed "Gentlemen, have you a diploma," of 20 persons practising as medical men in that city. Three practitioners who have attempted to answer the query appear to have come off second best, their diplomas seeming to be of a decidedly shady character. A Wanganui paper states that the following circular has been received by several publicans in the district: — "Wanganui, September Bth. Dear Sir— We earnestly entreat you, for the sake of your own spiritual welfare, and for the preservation from ruin of our husbands and sons, that you abandon the immoral and wicked business of Belling intoxicating liquors. We will be at your place of business to pray with you next Saturday. Come with us and we will do you good, and may God have mercy on your soul. By order of the Committee." Our Oamaru correspondent telegraphed on Tuesday as follows': — " There was a heavy fall of rain yesterday and to-day. The sea was rough at midday, and eleven vessels were ordered out. They all got out to sea except the Richard and Mary, which went ashore, but afterwards got off. A cutter had a narrow eHcape from running on the reef at the breakwater. The Elderalie was the last to move." It was at one time thought that the Richard and Mary would be wrecked, and telegrams were sent to Dunedin with referenoe to her insurauoe. The following is from the Southern Cross of the 17th ult. :— " With reference to a statement made in the Court; on Tuesday, in the course of the case of the Macgregor's detention of the mails, to the effect that no penalties had been exacted from the contractors, we are authorised to state that this is an error, and that although no part of the penalty of £25,000 provided under bond for failure of the servioe had as yet been exacted, the ordinary penalties for each day lost in delivery beyond the agreed on time, ha I been deducted from the subsidy." A police raid (says a local journal) has been made among the drapers in Greymouth under the Employment of Females Act. Messrs Thomas and M'Beath were, on Tuesday last, fined Ss and costs, for keeping a young woman in their employ at work, trimming a hat, after 2 a.m. on Saturday. Messrs Manson and Co., for a similar offence in employing two young ladies on the day named, were fined in a similar amount ; and Messrs Smith and Barclay, judging by the previous oases that technical defence availed nought, admitted a similar offence, and were fined Is only, with costs of Court. Writing of the "Military Captain," whose brief career in Dunedin was Drought to a close lately, the Colonist says :— " If that young man had settled down honestly to work (say for a dozen years or so), and if he had paid every man what he owed him, it ie very questionable indeed whether he would have obtained credit of any one if he had asked for it ; or if he had wanted some money for legitimate trade purpose, he might have obtained a loan (as a very great favour), by paying very dearly for it. So it is, honesty is frowned down and oppressed, while winuing smiles and a premium, are held out to roguery." Amongst the passengers by the s.s. Tararua on Wednesday, were two oompositors bound for the Palraor River. They had been employed in this office for some considerable time past. Being no longer "galley slaves," w« understand, they intend to work "in pocket." It is to be hoped that the North Australian blacks will not make "pye" of them, because they wish to keep their "frames" in good condition. When the compositors have whipped up several thousand "quoins," they intend to purchase a "chapel." May each return with a whole skin and a full "dock." They have seen about twenty-five summers. We have much pleasure in complying with the requesb of Mr David R. Hay, Honorary Secretary of the Scott Scholarship Fund, to acknowledge through our columns the receipt of a cheque for £10, which he received on Tuesday from Mr Davie, M.P.0., per Mr William Hepburn, of M'Landress, Hepburn, and Co., in aid of the fund. If our well to-do merchants and settlers all over the Province were to follow in the wake of Mr Davie, the fund would soon reach a sum alike creditable to the object and the people of the Province. Mr Hay desires us to state that be will only be too happy to acknowledge similar donations. We understand that the contract for the enlargement of Caversham school buildings has at leugth been let to Mr Thomas Laing, and that the work will be proceeded with, at | once. The proposed addition will consist of one good-sized class-room of brick, with stone foundation. A library and readingi room will be fitted up below at the same time, the natural slope of the ground enabling this to be done at little additional exj pense. The school is at present very 1 crowded, and the additional accommodation much required. The Forbury school buildings are now making a good show of approaching completion. The Kaikorai School Committee have ap- I pointed Mr Ritchie, formerly of the Thames, i second masker of the Kaikorai School, in the place of Mr Anderson, who resigned in consequence of ill-health. A plan for a teacher's residence was lately submitted to the Committee by the Secretary of the Education Board, and the opinion of the Committee was that the accommodation proposed was scarcely sufficient. It was resolved that the Education Board be thanked for the promptness with which they had responded to the ! request of tha Committee, and that they bo

asked to modify the plan so as to give addU tional accommodation. A gentleman, with whom Mr Cole, the leader of the Samoa rush, promised to communicate, informs us that he has telegraphed to the master of the schooner Paoifio, whioh arrived a few days back from Samoa, asking whether he had heard anything of the rush, and especially of a young gentleman who joined the party which left this place in the early part of June last. The master of the Pacifio replies as follows :: — '• Know nothing of rush or party you mention." If any of our readers have received any oommunioations from any of the party, we shall be glad to learn more of them. The alleged gold disooveries at Samoa have long sinoe been proved to be mythical One of themost interesting cricket matches which has been played in England during the season whioh is just over, was that between Yorkshire and Gloucestershire, for the benefit of Luke Greenwood. For the first three luonths of the season, Yorkshire had been unbeaten by any team her cricketers had encountered, but the "County of the Graces " was a tough nut for the Tykes to craok. Although the betting was iv favour of Yorkshire, the Gloucestershire men succeeded in defeating their opponents by an innings and upwards of 60 runs. W. G. Grace obtained three figures in his own peculiar style, and his brother, G, F., also proved a tower of strength to his side. Many will no doubt be interested to hear what has become of the submarine boat whioh, in its day, was the topic of much discussion. Ib occupied the attention of that grave and reverend body — the Otago Institute — where for a while moa bones were shelved as the leading question ; it ex» cited the imaginations of sanguine capitalists, whose great expectations were doomed to disappointment ; it was the subject of certain interesting experiments in Dunedia Bay, causing a sensation, and very nearly au inquest ; but it never went; to the Molyneux. It has been separated into parts, and lies near the Albany street Railway Station, and observing immigrants mistake it for a patent marine boiler. Mr Johnston, with hia characteristic acuteness and nice discernment, in defending a claim inthe R. M. Court last week, raised an objection which, h« contended, was an obstacle to further proceedings, and would result in a non-suit. The plaintiff sued aa a widow, and when asked what proof she had of her husband'B death, replied that she recoived a letter three or four j ears ago from a relative telling her of the fact, and she had not heard of him since. Counsel urged that the proof was insufficient ; sh/3 could not sue as a widow, and the case must therefore be quashed. Mr Bathgate termed it as a shabby defence, at which the spectators stamped loudly and applauded. Mr Johnston, unabashed, declined to offer any evidence, and said he would rely on the point, being perfectly satisfied it was a good one. This is the way in which Derby winners are honoured at home :—": — " There were great rejoicings at Swindon last night (says an Euglish paper) on the arrival of George Frederick, the Derby winner. The horse was trained in the adjoining village of Wroughton. A band of musio awaited the return of George Frederiok, and on hia alighting they struck up ' See the conquering hero comes.' A procession was formed, ana at OM Swindon the whole population of the place turned out to give t"e horse and his trainer, Tom Leader, a hearty welcome. The bells of the parish church at Wroughton, the actual place of training, were set ringing, bands of music paraded the streets, the cottagers made a profuse display of Mr Cartwrigbt's colours — black and scarlet— and kept up their demonstrations of delight to a late hour." The seotiona on both sides of Cumberland street from St. Andrew street to Hanover street, have been long, with an exception or two, a danger to the health of the city on account of the peßtilental emanations given off by the stagnant water colleoted on them, especially in the summer time. It therefore fives us pleasure to state that all on one side aye been filled up to such a height that water does not lodge on them, aud that those on the other side are now being filled up. The City Council is also deserving of creditable mention for attending to this long neglected part of the town, a considerable amount of kerbing being now laid down there. The locality presents indications that it will in a short time look better than it does now ; but, on the other hand, it must be said that it is high time for improvements to be made in so centrally situated a place. The Tuapeka Times gives the following aocount of the acoident to Mr G. F. C. Browne, M.P.C., proprietor of the Waita-' huna Coal Pit :— -The accident appears to have happened in this way : 0 a returning to the pit with an empty waggon, the horse bolted, when Mr Browne, who was driving at the time, leapt from the shafts to catch hold of the beast, but in doing so stumbled and fell, and the dray passed over hia back. Dr Halley, who was at once sent for, was soon iv attendance, aud did what he could to alleviate the suSerer. The injuries done to the spine must have been of a very serious nature, as the lower portions of Mr Browne's body were com- , pletely paralysed. On Thursday morning j he was much easier, and was able to move one of his feet ; but yesterday, he had made little or no progress towards recovery. A gentleman, while lately on a viiait to Melbourne from Dunedin, conferred, on behalf of the Dunedin cricketers, with Mr Gibson, of the Melbourne Club, and another leading member of that Club. Mr Gibson thought that, on account of the Melbourne men having so many up-country and Intercolonial matches, they could not visit this Colony unless they could return in four weeks, and they are still in hopes that a visit will be arranged. More and perhaps definite information will be received on the matter by next steamer. The Dunedin repres rntative, having very little time at his disposal, was unable to see Mr Handfield, the Secretary of the Club, but from those gentlemen whom he saw he got a most courteous reception. If the Melbourne cricketers come down, they cannot play through the Colony this year ; still they hope to be able to play in Dunedin and Christshurch, and would be glad to meet a combined team.

IWMAIW

MUNS^

MM

(/ii" Wiiinrcion correspondent telegraphed o.n~l<Y dry hs follows :— Mr Walter Turnbull has given a thousand pounds as an endowment to the Wellington College. — Private lpttera by the last English mail state that the Syndic ite, which took up the unsold b i lance of the last million and a half loan, uinler private arrangement,' did so with the promise of no more being placed in the market for a specified time. They have gince been endeavouring to sell at 97 cum dividend, but found no buyers even at that. — Mr Vogel, before his departure, received semi-official intimation through the AgentGeneral of the intention of the home Government to grant him the Knighthood of St. Michael and St. George. The following is the latest betting, given in the Melbourne Leader of the 19th instant : — " During the race week at Sydney Canterbury was backed to win the Maribyrnong Plate for about £3000 at 10 to 1, and the Avalanche filly at 1000 to 50. sto 1 was offered freely against anything for the Victoria Derby, Melbourne and Neredah being most spoken of. For the Melbourne Cup 100 to 20 was Ooldsbrough's price nominally, 100 to 10 Horatio, 100 to 8 Fitzyattendon, 100 to 8 Lapidist, 100 to 6 Fugleman, 100 to 5 Speculation, 100 to 5 The Diver, and 100 to 4 Dagworth. A speculator, on the evening succeeding the Metropolitan, took £2000 to 120 about Fugleman, it being made up by the ring, who seemed only too anxious to lay ; and some £5000 was taken on the course after the Randwick Plate about Horatio at 100 to 8." We hear from Auckland that a new evening paper is to be started, under the control of Mr Jones, the proprietor of the Waikato Times, and formerly of Jones and Tombs, of Christchurch. The funds are provided by subscriptions among what is known as the Mac'arlane Party in that city, and the object is less to supply a public want than to put down th-» Evening Star, which, however rash occasionally, has secured a strong hold of the public by its outspoken vigour. Of course it has made many enemies, and as it docs not appear to have acted in its strictures with any regard to the wealth or position of those whom it has attacked, they resent the impertinence, and propose to crush it by opposition. Newspapers started on Buch a principle have not often been successful, and we shall watch the experiment in Auckland with some interest. The following is the calendar of prisoners for trial at the Criminal Sessions of the Supreme Court at Dunedin, commencing on Monday, the sth October, before His Honour Mr Justice Chapman, and the offences with which they are charged :—: — John Collins, stealing from the person at Dnnedin. ! Patrick Walsh, forgery at Oamaru. Edward Johnson, uttering a forged cheque at Oamaru. Sydney G. Alexander, obtaining money by f jJlae pretences at Dunedin (two cases). Leong Chung Wah, sodomy at Dunedin. Robert Gait, maliciously killing a ,calf at Hampden. On Bail. \ John Blakely, cattle stealing at Ida Volley (two cases). On bail. William Williams, stealing from the person at Duuedin. On bail. We are informed by Messrs Driver, Stewart, and Co. • that the magnificent estate of Wantwood, on the Mataura, formerly the property of Fitzwilliam Wentworth, Esq., of Sydney, has changed hands for a sum of over £90,000, and we are much pleased to be able to sta^e that it has fallen into equally good handß, the purchaser being Joseph Clarke, Esq., of Melbourne, formerly of Tasmania, who ia also the proprietor of Moa Flat Estate in this Province. This gentleman during a recent visit to this City identified himself by liberal donations to our various local charitable institutions, and this late addition to Mr Clarke's already large interest in the Province, indicates without doubt his confidence in our future prosperity, an example which, we venture to think, will be followed by other large capitalists in Australia. Our correspondent at the Maori Kaik writes : — "The wekthec here, since Saturday evening, has been extremely wet, having rained uuceasiugly since its commencement, with no indications of a clearing up. It is j feared the crop 3on the flats will be seriously injured, as they are in many places already I under water. — The whalers completed the trying-out of their whale on Saturday last, obt lining therefrom about seven tuns of oil. Should the same price per tun be realised this year as two years ago (about £35 per tun), a handsome sum will be obtained — a reward which has been well earned after five months' work for nothing previous to capturing this one. — A meeting of Europeans and Natives is to be held on Wednesday next, having for its object the appointing of a deputation to wait upon His Honour the Superintendent with reference to the long-talked-of road from Portobello to the Heads." In noticing the resources of the Kaitangata district in last issue (says the Clutha Leader) we mentioned the discovery which had then just been made, of a very valuable seam of coal on the ground of the Kaitangata Coal Company. In order to take advautage ,of this discovery and fully develop their extensive field, the Company immediately took action in the ' matter, aud have resolved to increase their capital aud place into the market 1000 shares for sale. Ail the necessary arrangements have been made, and the prospectus will be issued iv a few days. So soon as those shares shall have been taken up, it is intended to build a steamer expressly for the Kaitangata coal trade, the river being navigable as high up as the pit for vessels of 100 tons. We believe there will bo n > difficulty whatever in disposing of the additional shares, and there is thus every probability that the Kaitangata Coal Company will shortly be engaged in a very large and renmneiative trade with the metropolis. Our East Taieri correspondent writes that the weather has broken up, aad put an end to the sowing of seed for a time. Sowing was goin^ on late and early when the wuather permitted. The crops already, above ground and coining through, look well, especially the wheat and oats, but some of the barley does not look well, being nearly yellow instead of a healthy green. In some pkces the plough is still kept going, and

there is a gocd deal of land yet to be turned over. There is a large increase in the area of laud being put under crop this season, owing to the high prices that have been ruling of late for all kinds of produce. Some few patches of potatoes in the district have yet to be lilted, and some are being sown in sheltered spots. The grass has fairly started, and shows a good growth, whilst some of the gardens have a good show of peach, plum, and almond blossoms. Where the fruit trees have been attended to they look well, but in most cases they are neglected.

We give in another column a report of the meeting cf the shareholders of the Colonial Bank, which was held on Wednesday. Mr W. J. M. Larnach was in the chair. The Masonic Hall was well filled, and all clashes of the community who possess a stake in the country, it may be said, were represented. One gentleman described the meeting well when he said that it was the very best he had ever seen in Dunedin. The election of seven directors took place by ballot, and in the course of the evening the scrutineers announced that the following gentlemen had been elected :— The Hon. Mathew Holmes, and Messrs A. W. Morris, W A Tolmie, W. J. M. Larnach, J. Reid (Merton), D. Reid, M.H.R., J. Reid (EldersHe). Messrs W. D. Meares and Ed. Smith were elected auditors.

A sad relic of poor humanity was found on Tuesday at the Port by a party of fishermen returning home from a cruise. They were a little above Observation Point when their attention was diverted by an object, suspiciously like a human body, lying on the beach 'a little below high-water mark, and on pulling in to examine it, found that it was indeed the remains of some poor fellow who had met his death by drowning. The body was well dressed in black clothes, but fearfully decomposed, only the bones being visible ; iv fact, as one of the finders remarked, it was just held together by the clothes. It had evidently been in the water a long time, and may possibly prove to be the remains of the fourth of the young men who were drowned off Sawyer's Bay on the Queen's Birthday. The fishermen gave information of the occurrence to the Police, and the remains were brought in and de posited at the Morgue, where an inquest, we presume, will be held in due course.

A convention of the Independent Order of Good Templars, of whom there were about 250 present, was held last week in the Temperance Hall, Moray Place, Bro. J. W. Jago, P.G.W.C.T., occupying the chair. The Chairman made an address, and was followed by Bros. James, De L. Graham, Price, Adams, Cameron, J. Wilson, Cooke, R. N. Adams, Cook, and Rev. Dr Roseby. Several resolutions of great importance to the Order were discussed and unanimously passed, and the following delegates were appointed to proceed to Christchurch, to be present at a convention for the purpose of instituting a Grand Lodge in the Middle Island, to be held in that city on the 29th inst. :— J. A. D. Adams, P.W.C.D., D. C. Cameron, W.C.T., and W. Carr, D.P.G.W.C.T. Votes of thanks were accorded to the Provisional Grand Officers for their presence and attention, and to the officers and members of the Lodge Pioneer of Dunedin, No. 2, ' fot their promptitude in convening the meeting.

The human remains that were found at the Port on Monday have been identified (by the clothing) as those of a seaman named James Smith, who, with two others, named Crunch and Brown, attempted to desert from the ship Corona on the night of the 28th August, by paddling ashore on two ladders lashed together. We commented on the circumstance a day or two subsequently. It appears that Crunch diew back from the venture at the last moment, but Smith and Brown persevered with the attempt, and were supposed to have safely reached shore. It ia saiH that Brown did escape, havingsince been seen on shore ; but if the identification of the remains by the man's shipmates is not a mistake, it would seem as if Smith came to grief in his neck- or- nothing venture. It would perhaps be worth while to try and discover, the whereabouts of Brown, as he, 'doubtless, could throw some light on the fate of his companion. An inquest upon the remains will be held at the Port to-day.

By the Albion, which arrived on Sunday ast from Melbourne, 17 superior merino rams were imported by Mr Watson Shennan, of this Province, and through his courtesy we have had an opportunity of examining them. The rams were selected by Mr Shennan from the celebrated flock of Messrs Gibson, of Tasmania, and Mr C. B. Fislier, of South Australia. The Gibson flocks are now admitted to be the highest class sheep in the Australian Colonies, rams bred by Messrs Gibson having recently brought the highest prices ever paid for merino sheep in Australia. Mr Shennan's rams have since their arrival been much admired by many of the best judges of sheep in the Province ; and we feel sure they will prove a valuable acquisition to the flock of their importer. A large number of pure merino rams and ewes has been imported to the various Provinces from Victoria and Tasmania during the present season, and it is not too much to expect that in the course of a few years New, Zealand flocks will take rank second to none in the Australasian Colonies.

The promoters of the Dunedin to Forbury and Portobello Railway have leceived a very encouraging answer from the Government, in reply to a communication sent a few days ago, and asking certain concessions. The Provincial Government has promised to concede to the Company all lands under the control of the Province over which the proposed line will run, Without compensation ; and if there should be any difficulty in regard to arranging for a central terminus, the Government will make a further grant of land so situated as to be suitable for that purpose. They will also recommend the General Government to make a grant to the Company of sufficient land along the foreshore at Portobello to carry the line along. The Provincial Government have expressed themselves of opinion that it -will be better for the Company to work the line with their own rolling stock — but, at the same time, should the Government have sufficient plant at its disposal, terms may be agreed to with the Company for its use. These concessions,

together with Mr D. Proudfoot's grant of' a strip of land the full width of his valuable property near the Ocean Beach, are most encouraging to the Company.

In the Hawaiian Gazette of the 12th of August, a contributor thus amusingly writes of the approaching transit of Venus: — "The planets Venus and Jupiter have presented a pretty sight the past few evenings, as they have been approaching each other for their periodical conjunction. The celestial coquette is making herself unusually notorious this year. After dancing around grim Jupiter, and having her periodical t£te-a-tete with him, as she is now doing, she proposes a chase after the suu. When she flirts with Jupiter, nobody cares much about it, though all must confess she plays her part well, and makes the fellow stand aside for her. But when she approaches old Sol, as she intends to do December Bth, and undertakes to make him her beau, then all the savans in the universe, are started up, and chase all round this globe to get the best position to observe the colour of her skirta and measure the length of her shadow. A strange girl is this Venus. Look at her this evening, and tell us if you don't think she is pretty as she waltzes past old Jupiter."

There is scarcely awy mention of the New Zealand horses Lurline and Papapa, in the Melbourne papers to hand by the Albion. In an article on the coming Melbourne Cup, a writer in the Australasian says : — Horses like Dagworth, Horatio, The Ace, Lurline, The Arrow, King of the Ring, if the handicap were now to be made, would get some show, whereas they are considered clean •'wiped out" by Goldsbrough, and no public money will be put on them. With reference to the rumoured offer of £4500 for Goldsbrough, "Augur" writes as follows: " Goldsbrough' b Metropolitan performance stamped him aa a horse of the highest class, for he had more to contend with than a heavy weight, but despite these difficulties he nearly pulled through. There appear to be all'sorts of rumours floating about concerning this horse— one to the effect that his owner has been offered £4500' for him. In the face of these rumours it would be unwise indeed for the public to touch him at present, for though there need be no fear while he remains in Mr Tait's hands, a change of ownership might necessitate a change of trainer, and in that case there would, perhaps, be a poor look-out for the horse's backers."

The Right Rev. Bishop Nevill conduoted the opening services of St. Michael's Church, at Shield Hill, Anderson's Bay, last Sunday. In consequence of the continuous rain-fall, only about 60 persons were present in the morning. The church, which has a neat arid well- finished appearance, will accommodate 140 seatholders. In the first instance, it was only intended to be a temporary erection. Considerable credit is due to the residents at Anderson'B Bay, who have displayed much energy in the matter. The church was beautitully decorated, and ' the choir, the members of which had been practising for some time previously, rendered, the musical portion of the service very creditably. The Bishop gave an excellent discourse, choosing the epistle of the day (4th Ephesians) as his text. Hymns suitable to the occasion were heartily sung, and' the Holy Communion waß celebrated. The total cost of the building was £330. We understand that the Church authorities contempJate shortly to appoint a permanent minister for the Peninsula district.

As a caution to those who are so anxious to leave this Colony at once for the Palmer goldfield, we quote from the Melbourne Argus the following telegram from Brisbane, dated September 18: — "The Courier publishes an article warning ia the strongest termß against any rush to the Palmer until the wet season is past." Our Queensland correspondent, under date September 9th, says: — By the last reliable returns from the Palmer, we find that 15,000 ounces of gold were shipped from Cooktown in one week. Large finds are being made, and fresh auriferous country is constantly being discovered. On the other hand, carriage is £130 a ton, and a pannikin of flour (when you can get it) costs as much as would find bread for a week for a large family in Dunedin. The Cooktown Herald Bays that the last pair of boots on the Palmer were sold the other day. They were ordinary common . blucher boots ; they were tens in size ; and their purchaser waß a man who usually uses eights : but he was satisfied, quite, with the size, and paid thirty-eight shillings for the pair.

His Excellency the Governor (says the New Zealand Times of the 19th ult.) left Wellington yesterday afternoon in his yacht, the Blanche, intending to run across the Strait to Nelson, where H.M.S. the Blanche is now at anchor. Thence he will proceed on the West Coast as far as Miiford Sound, the war steamer accompanying him. Some difficulty was experienced when the yacht was leaving, in consequence of the anchor fouling, but after one or more efforts a fair start was effected. His Excellency's crime will, it is anticipated, extend over about three weeks. The friends of Lady Fergusson will he glad to learn that her health has improved to such an extent during the paßt few days that Sir James could leave her without the slightest feeling of anxiety. The younger branches of His Excellency's family will sail for England in the Halcione, now lying at the anchorage, which vessel has very superior passenger accommodation. His Excellency will not leave till on or about the time that the Marquis of Norman by is relieved by Mr Cairns of the charge of governing Queensland. This, it is expected, will take place early in December.

Some of the English birds introduced by the Acclimatisation Society seem to be getting very plentiful in the neighbourhood of Dunedin. The chaffinches, which are now building, are to be seen in many gardens, and thrushes are more frequently noticed than hitherto. At Roslyn and the "Valley of the Water of Leith the latter birds are in ponsiderable numbers, and on the road to Blueskin a colony of thrushes has been established. An eye will require to be kept upon those new comers who possess guns, and who, contending that this is a free country, think they can destroy all birds and beasts that come in their way. Sunday ,is the usual day for these sportsmen to nrowl about the country, and the proba-

bility is that they are not over-particular as to what they shoot. We hear of a covey of partridges which had taken up its quarters not far from town being considerably reduced in number lately, and of pheasants being scared from their nests. Every case of the destruction of imported birds should be reported to the police ; and we feel satisfied that one or two convictions would soon put an end to this unlawful sport.

A fire occasioned by water is not an everyday occurrence. Messrs Findlay and Co.'s timber yard and mill had another narrow escape from being burned down late on Saturday night. It seems that extensive brickwork alterations are being made in connection with the mill, and the workmen doing the work very carelessly left three bags of lime leaning up against the wall of the building in Cumberland street. The rain which fell on that night, fell from the roof of the building od to the lime, which soon ignited the bags till they blazed up against the iron wall of the building. The fire had even proceeded so far as to ignite the sawdust under the building. Fortunately a man going by at the time raised the alarm, and with the aid of a few buckets of water from the Auld Scotland Hotel opposite, the flames were quickly subdued. Had it escaped notice for a very short time longer, a serious conflagration might have been the result. With the narrow escape from fire experienced lately in the case of Messrs Butterworth's premises in High street from the same cause, it should be a lesson to those who have to do with lime to see that it is put out of the way of doing harm.

A very pleasant reunion was held at Haydon's Star and Garter Hotel, Albany street, on Tuesday last when some twentyflve fellow officials and friends of Mr F. J. Bunny sat down to a supper, which was given to that gentleman by those who, during the time he has been engaged in the service of the Telegraph Department in this City, have ■» been largely connected with him, and esteem his business habits and social qualities. The chair was filled by Mr T. Muir, and the vice- chair by Mr J. Allen. In proposing success to Mr Bunny, the chairman expressed the regret of his fellow- officers of the department that Mr Bunny was leaving Dunedin, but hoped that his removal to St. Bathans, where he proceeds in a few days to take charge, would be to his advantage. Mr Bunny, in acknowledging the compliment, said that it gave him great pleasure to be able to state that during the five years he had been in Dunedin he had made troops of friends, while he was not conscious of having made a single enemy. Other toasts followed,, and shortly before midnight the company separated, after spending the evening very enjoyably.

Who got the first prize for " black-reds ?" We thought that momentous question had been conclusively settled. Mr A. M'Donnell, however, has called on. us, and shown us a card on which the Poultry Show's first prize for "Game — Black-red, adult," is awarded to him, under the signature of the Hon. Secretary, Mr Sly, and considers that, though some time has elapsed since the Show was held, it is only tight that he should be stated aa the prize-taker, and not another gentleman. An explanation of the matter has already been published — namely, that the Judges awarded Mr M'Donnell first prize, and subsequently reversed their decision, and gave Mr Pell first prize ; and, not haying informed the Secretary of the rescension of their decision, a first-prize certificate was awarded to Mr M'Donnell, which he now holds. Mr Pell has also got a first prize. Each has got a first prize for the same thing, and ought, to be happy, but is not so. Each wants the honour exclusively, to himself. But as to which of them is en titled to the honour of having the better pair of black-reds, we think the public doesn't care two straws. We don'b.

Says "Atticus," in the Melbourne Leader : — "The retirement of Sir James Fergusson from the Governorship of New Zealand has caused some surprise, but no regret. Sir James Fergusson is essentially a disagreeable man.' He has a very high opinion of himself, his family, and his importance, and a very keen idea oi the value of money. In his second marriage he took care to provide himself with the very opposite of 'a portionless bride with a long pedigree.' Al though he is always prating of his patrician blood, and his high descent from the great Earl of Glencairn, he resembles much more the canny advocate who retrieved the fortunes of the Fergussons, and purchased a 'Nova Scotian baronetcy. He always reminded me in his dealings with the' colonists of South Australia and New Zealand, of the great noble, who lived in feudal state, but was not above adding to his pecuniary income by selling his cabbages and gooseberries. One day while walking through his park he met a little child walk r ing away with a jug in her hand. He asked who she was, took her in his arms and kissed her, saying 'when you grow up to be a woman always recollect that .you were once kissed by the Duke of Loamshire; the Marquis of Normanville, th"c Earl of Thistleton, and Baron Llanelly, Knight of the Garter, and Lord Lieutenant of Loamshire.' 'Yea air,' replied the little damsel, ' but you always take the penny for the milk. ' "

A private letter from Auckland states :—: — " It appears as if, politically, they are jn for unquiet times here. Russell seems to have gone hand and heart with Vogel on the abolition of the North Island Provinces ; but the people are dead against it. I believe, from all they say, that they would go in for their abolition throughout the Colony, especially if they can Colonialise the Land Revenue at the same time ; but they will resist to the best of their power being placed under a Resident Minister, who will be a small autocrat among them. The general idea is, that if this were carried out, Russell would be called to the Upper House and be Resident Minister ; but 1 don't place much faith in this myself. His power and influence seem as great here without as they would be with this office, and there must, be some other reason for his unusual political activity. It is the correct thing, I find, to speak snnbbingly of Provincial Government and all connected with it. .-The General Government ia the only thing with which men ,of capital

fl\ould be connected.- '■ [Query : Can this be that they find it easier to pull the • wires there ? Quien sabe ?] ' More than one seem to think that the secret lies in that direction, and that there is some big job -a-foot which they think worthy the attention they never give to public affairs under ordinary circumstances. An old Aucklander at my side pointed out, with a curious smile, Russell, Williamson, and other Bank powerß, et hoc genus omne, present at the' last public meeting, and told me " there was money in the thing somewhere," or they would not he present. The newspapers are dead againßt the partial abolition of Provinces. Even the Cross- of which I am told Vogel still owns the half — is obliged to go against it, so strong is public opinion."

An inquest upon the body of a man named James Smith, that was found on ' Monday afternoon in the harbour, about Cannon Point, was held on Wednesday, at Port Chalmers, before Dr O'Donoghue, Coroner, and a Jury of twelve, Mr Dench acting as foreman. When the Jury Were being sworn Mr David Miller, who had been subpoenaed, dech'nfd to serve, on the plea that in the year 1863 he had served on the Jury that was empannelled to sit at the inquest held in connection with the loss of the Pride of the Yarr'a. That Jury had- not been discharged, and hence he contended that he was not competent to' serve again whilst hampered by that engagement. The Coroner said he would take a note of the objection and refer it to the authorities ; meantime Mr Miller would be permitted to retire. 'He, however, was of opinion that he was liable to serve, but as there was a full panel without him, he (the Coroner) should not insist upon his remaining. ' Several witnesses" were examined, and from their' evidence' it appeared that the deceased and another seaman belonging to the Corona bad left, that vessel on a ladder, which they used as a raft, on the night of the 29th of August. Deceased was drowned, and the other nia^* James Brown — managed to reach the' shore. The. inquest was adjourned to enable the Police to produce the man Brown, whose evidence is of importance.

Our Toia-Tois correspondent writeß :— A public meeting was held at Fortroae on Saturday evening, the 19fch ult., to receive report from the Local Committee respecting the erection of a' school, for which purpose £106 had been collected. The school,'according to the original resolutions, was to be erected as a local institution, and let or leased to the Educational Board. In the meantime, for the purpose of a school other* wise, the subscriptions were to be returned if requested. It appeared that the Local Committee hadfiauthorised the appli6ation (by one of its members) to the Waste Lands Board, Dunedin, for liberty to purchase five acres of land in the Townsh ; p Reserve of Tois Tois, whereon to erect the Baid>uilding, but up to the. present Jime no such application had been made. " Therefore the Local Committee resigned and obtained a return of their collections. \ They then proceeded to elect a new committee, with the unanimous resolve to use every effort for the speedy erection of a school, in accordance with the Education Ordinance.' The following gentlemen were, upon -a -show of hands, ' elected without dissent :—: — Messrs G. H. Attwood, H. Cameron,'- J. Christie, H. Carswell, H. Goldlng, M'lntosh, R. M'Kenzie, J. Kiddle;, and J. B. Smith. Mr G. H. Atfcwood was elected chairman, and Mr H. Cameron to be the hon. sec. and treasurer. It was .then resolved that the committee should meet again- for pose .of paying in subscriptions and for further progress on October 3rd, 1874. On the motion of Mr H. Cameron, the meeting is to take into consideration the advisability of this district being formed into a Road District in accordance with the Road Ordinance, 1871.

In the New Zealand Gazette, of the 24th inst. is published a circular, despatch^^roni the Secretary of State to the officer administering the Government of New Zealand, transmitting a letter from the Foreign Office, enclosing a translation of a note from the German Ambassador at this Court, requesting various facilities for the German Expedition which will shortly set 'out for the observation of the Transit of Venus, a request is made, that every assistance may be given in furtherance of the desires of the Geinian Government. From the German Ambassador's letter it 1 appears that four expeditions have been fitted: out by Germany. The first of these expeditions will proceed by Southampton,. Alexandria, Suez, to Tschifu in China, and in' its journey there and back will touch at Aden, • Point de Galle, Bombay, Madras, Singapore; and Hong Kong, places under British sovereignty. Another Expedition, „111., intended , for, the Auckland Islands, will go partly by London, partly by Egypt, Aden, Point de Galle, to Melbourne and Dunedin.- Afurther Expedition, IV., will proceed through the Suez Canal, by Aden to Mauritius, to observe) the Transit there. Expedition 11., which has already departed" in His Majesty's ship Gazelle, for the' Kerguelen Islands, will, on its return, join Expedition IV. at, Mauritius. The expedition for the Aucklands will consist of Phil. Dr Hugo Seiiiger, Observ'ator of the"Royal University Observatory at Bonn ; Phil. Dr Wilhelm Schur, Assistant^ the Imperial University Observatory at Stras- ■ burg ; Hermann Kune, Teacher at the Royal Polytechnicon at Dresden ; Phil. Dr Guido Wolfram, of Dresden ; Mechanician,"* Hermann Leyser, of Leipsioj' 'Photographer, Johannes Krone, of Dresden. , Officers in the service of the New Zealand Government are hereby directed to render every assistance in their power to such of the ships and officers of the German Empire as may visit these islands in the course, of their voyage.

The Alta California of 22nd May says :— "The Executive Council of New South Wales has determined to pardon a'nunibor of convicts wlio have'been imprisoned eight or ten years for highway robbery, under the condition that they shall leave Austtalfe. That is very kind on the part 'Of New South Wales ; and as many of ' these scamps would in the ordinary course of. business ; come to California, we might get even |by pardonifig a lot of our most dangerous felons, if tMy will promise to.go to New South Wales &nd send each back the scalp of a nieniber 'tit the Executive Council." . , .i. , - •' > <

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Bibliographic details

News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 1192, 3 October 1874

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10,176

News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 1192, 3 October 1874

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