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News of the Week.

Mr W. D. Stewart has been appointed a Perpetual Commissioner for taking acknowledgements of married women. The Rev. G. Fraser, from Victoria, officiated in the First Church on Sunday, and the morning and evening services were well attended. Mr J. R. P. Stamper has been, after examination, admitted and enrolled a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. Mr Hugh Joseph Finn was on Monday admitted and enrolled by His Honour Mr Justice Chapman as a Barrister and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand. Tho New Zealand Herald is informed that five or six of the most recent of the immigrants to Auckland are of a most valuable character, they having come provided with sums varying from £500 to £800. The current number of the Christian Eeccd contains a deal of interesting reading matter, including a funeral sermon preached at Westminster Abbey by the Rev. Dean Stanley on the late Dr Livingstone. Mr R. Stout, member for Caversham in the Provincial Council, addressed his constituents on o,'uesday, and was well received. Notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, there was a good attendance. By a mistake in copying our Oamaru telegrams it is made to appear that the Oamaru people unanimously disapproved of Mr Vogel's resolutions for the abolition of the North Island Provinces, whereas they unanimously approved of them. The return of the Nelson public schools for the year ending 30bh of June, 1874, shows an increase of 162 scholars during the past year — the total number of children now on the rolls being 3833. There are at present 56 schools under the control of the Board. Mr Hamilton, the watchman of Messrs Guthrie and Larnach's saw mills, was severely burned on tho left side of the face and head, iv his endeavour to extinguish the fire when it was first discovered on Saturday morning. His left ear was literally roasted. Captain Harrison, of the schooner Hally Bayley, which arrived from llobart Town on Tuesday, had on board when he started, a live platypus, caught in Tasmania. The little animal died on the voyage. It has, we understand, been presented to the Museum for preservation. The Registrar-General, in some remarks appended to the statistics relating to health in the principal towns of New Zealand, says that he has again to notice the fact that cases of diphtheria appear to be more frequent in Dunedin and Christchurch than in auy of the other boroughs. Mr Pollock, who has been for some time sinking for coal on Mr Allan Kiug's property at Burnsido, has discovered a good seam of coal in proximity to the Southern Trunk Railway. This an important discovery, and will enhance the value of Burnside township, which is to be sold by Messrs Driver and Co., on the sth proximo. Mr Bathgate last week delivered his longpending Judgment in the law-suit of Burrows v. Smith, action of £100 damages through a vehicle collision. Damages were assessed at £19, for which Judgment was given, but Mr Stout said the decision was against evidence, and gave notice of applying for a re-hearing. During the week ending August 23rd, nineteeu patients were admitted into the Dunedin Hospital, aud twenty-six were discharged therefrom. Oue patient (ii d — 'Jharles Adams, aged 37, miner, native of Cork — apoplexy, from disease of the brain. The number at present in the Hospital is 175, of whom 36 are females. We have reoeived from Messrs Tteith and Wilkie a copy of their now map of the Province of Otago. Tho map itself is neatly and carefully got up, while the sheet also contains a large amount of useful information with reference to every district and township in tho Province. The new map will be found useful in every oifice. In the Suez mail news published in another column, is reported the death of Miss Agnea Strickland, a poetess and historical authoress of considerable reput^. Miss Strickland wag born early in the present century, and in 1871 she received a Civil List pension of £100, in recognition of the merit displayed in her literal y works. We observe that the Provincial Government have adopted our suggestion in publishing the occupations as well as tho names of the immigrants open for engagement. If the list was not eutombed iv the Provincial Government Gazette it might provo usoful to the publio, and lead to the employment of a good many of the i who want work. The Mabel Jaue, says the Southland Times, is the only craft iv port at present. | It is expected that she will make another attempt to reach the Aucklands in the course of a week or ten days. As a fresh skipper has been secured, hopes are entertained that the expedition will be salely lauded in Sarah's Boaom, or some equally desirable haven. The Mussel Bay reclamation contract is fast drawing to a close, only a very small space being left to fill in. The Port people are beginning to enquire as to the intentions of the Government respecting the made-up ground, which really constitutes a valuable property. Is it to be the site of warehouses, or a new railway station ; or is it to be sold in building lots by auction ? Messrs Kincaid, M 'Queen, and Co. are making an engine and boiler for their works, which they are extending. The power will be 25-horse nominal. They are also making an engine and boiler of the same size for Mr Hasßell, a miller of Oamaru. Mr Hassell's flour mill is driven by a wind-mill, and he intends to use steam power whenever the wind is not sufficiently Btrong. During the quarter ended 30th June, 1&74, the total number of vessels entered inwards at the several ports of New Zealand was 180, the tonnage amounting to 85,362 tons, as against 161 vessels and 62,079 tons for the corresponding quarter of 1873. The number of vessels that cleared out for the quarter ] ended Jane 30th, 1874, was 204, and the ton- J nage 91,645 tons, as against 182 vessels and ; 72,320 tons for the corresponding quarter of j 197$

There have been a mirnber of clearances from the Caversham Immigration Barracks during the past week, there being no less than tweaty-two families, comprising 44 adults, and 40 children. Of these nine were German families, who were sent to Waihola. There yet remain in the Barracks 149 adults and 186 children. The next immigrant vessel expected to arrive is the Corona, which left London on the 23rd May. Two boot and shoe manufacturing machines, the order for the construction of which is in execution by Messrs Kincaid, M 'Queen, and Co., are capable of cutting GOO pairs a week of all kinds, being a quan tity sufficient 1o keep going from, fifty to •■ixty hands. The mn climes are for Me«srHaig, JJramwell, and Co.'s Dunedin Boot Factory. Rivettiug stands and lasts, for the same firm, are also being made. A Wellington contemporary says, among things not generally known, ie may be menI tioned that during the March quarter of this year as many as 23,421 rabbit skins were exported from Wellington, their value being £641. The only other port from which similar exports were slvpped was the Muff, but there the number was only 500, valued at £10. All the skins were originally collected in the Marlborough Province. A meeting of persons willing to nssist in the formation of a Working Men's Club and Mechanics' Institute ia Dunedin was held at the Athenaeum Hall on Monday. Hia Worship the Mayor occupied the chair. The attendance was very limited, and the working classes were poorly represented. Several speakers displayed a disposition to discuss other questions than those submitted to them, and the meeting was rather disorderly. Complaints are being made as to the limited number of trucks for conveying coal from Green Island Railway Station. Mr James Freeman, who has been for s«me time working an excellent mine at Abbotsford, can only obtain the services of one truck, while uuder other circumstances he could supply four per day. Mr Samson is similarly situated ; for with ample means at his disposal for facilitating the output, he could employ more trucks than now can be obtained. The adjourned annual meeting of the Roslyn Road Board was held in the Linden School-house on Monday evening. Present — Messrs A. H. Ross (Chairman), Kilgour, Begg, and Farley. Mr Kilgour was re-elected Treasurer, Messrs Curie and Lambert honorary Inspectors, and Mr Spiers Clerk. It was resolved, that the Clerk proceed at once to revise the assessment roll of the district, so that a rate may be levied in sufficient time to j allow of alt necessary works in the district being executed during the summer months. The enlargement to be made to the Caversham school will give additional accommodation for from 80 to 100 pupils. There will be a new entrance, making three entrances to the building. The ground falls considerably away from the basement of the new portion, and advantage will be taken of this to make a room on tne basement 20ft. x 40fb. for the Caversham Public Library. In this way, at a alight additional expense, a room, which will be a great public convenience to the district, will be acquired. Mr David Robs is the architect. Samples of the bricks that are being turned out at Messrs Lee, Smith, and Fotheringhain's brick factory at Hillside were left at our office the other day. The samples are, be- ! yond all doubt, superior in quality to any bricks we have ever seen made in Dunedin by the ordinary process. The burning has been thorough, and the bricks, which are of a good weight, have a ring, which is certain indication of their excellent quality. The factory, we are informed, will be abb. to turn out 60,000 bricks per week. The late extensive fire at Messrs Guthrie and Larnach's manufactory was subject for a coroner's investigation on Tuesday. From the evidence adduced, the fire would seem to have ignited from the furnace, and nothing suspicious Was elicited. An open verdict was returned, accompanied with a rider re« commending that greater precautions bhotild in future be taken where engines are used near inflammable materials ; and that two watchmen for the bull-tower should be employed, and an indicating clock kept as a check upon them. Several friendly merchants and importers in Wellington (says the New Zealand Times) recognising the able manner in which Mr Hack worth, lately Collector of Customs at this port, but recently removed to Dunedin, had carried out the duties of his office, collected the sum of sixty guineas, and for. warded a cheque to him for the amount, receipt of which has buen acknoAVledged. The rule in the service is that such ]>resentitions should not be made J but in Mr Hackworth's case it was relaxed. The news will be satisfactory to his many friends. The Dunedin Presbytery met in the North Taieri Church on the evening of Thursday week. After a service by Dr ytuart, the form of call having been read by the Re\ r i Wm. Gillies, it was moved and seconded that the name of Mr John Sutherland, M.A., be inserted in it. As no other person was pro* posed, Mr Sutherland was declared duly elected. The call, wMch was left in charge of the office bear-era for additional signature?, will be placed in. Mr Sutherland's hands at the meeting of the Presbytery, to be held in Dunedin, on the first Wednesday of September. The assailants in the cowardly affray at Anderson's Bay on Sunday last were placed at the bar of the Resident Magistrate's Court on Wednesday, charged with doing grievous bodily harm : an indictable offence. The circumstances were very disgraceful, but as the injuries sustained by prosecutor were not of so grave a nature as to warrant His Worship committing prisoners for trial, the information with withdrawn, and one for common assault laid, whereby they were summarily dealt with. The Magistrate fined them each £5, with the alternative of six weeks' imprisonment. The Collector of Customs (Mr Hackworth) snd Capt. Orkney (Deputy Harbor-Master) held an official enquiry into the circum- | stances attending the collision, in the Lower l Harbour, on the Bth inst., between the p. 9. i ComeraDg and the cutter Hope, whereby ; the latter was sunk. Mr Joyce conducted *he ias? for William jxdi?r, ureter oi the

Hope, who instituted the enquirj 7 ; Mr G. 8. Brodrick represented the owners of the Comerang, and Capt. Russell appeared on behalf of the Insurance Companies interested. We withhold our report until the enquiry is concluded. The Cromwell Argus congratulates its readers on the astonishing number of buUdings which have recently been erected, or are in course of erection, at Cromwell, the most importaut among them being a schoolroom, an Athenaeum, a Church of England, and a stone structure by Messrs Hallensteia and Co. Th« latter building, when complefed, will be the finest iv the district. Tenders are also called for tho erection of a district Hospital, to cost about £900. Our contemporary says that, uutil lately, there was not a decent building in the town, except the Catholic Chapel and the Post Office. The Tuapeka railway line is progressing favourably. The earth work is f asc approaching completion, and the masonry of all the bridges and culverts is ueaily all done. The hindrance to the carrying through of this line will be the Glenore tunnel. The material excavated from this tunnel ia clay slate, almost as hard as blue stone. The contractor ha* one of the patent rock drills at work at one end. The averago progress from each end is about eighteen inches per day. The drill is found to answer well. It is now worked by steam direct, but it is intended to be worked by air compressed by steam. Our Wellington correspondent telegraphed as follows <n Saturday: — "A Government caucus meeting, held to-day at Mr Vogel's, was attended by 44 members, and lasted a long time, but the result is indefinite. The idea of a dissolution was discussed, and found very little support. Their proposal of a special session before Christmas was considered, but it was reoeived unfavourably. Ultimately, those present gave a general pledge to oppose Mr Fitzherbert's resolution, and to support the Government on a Bill for the abolition of the North Island Provinces next session. Mr Stafford was present. We have received a copy of the catalogue of the Supreme Court library, Dunedin. It has been carefully compiled, well arranger l , nicely printed, and very neatly bound. i Every alternate leaf is blank, an arrangement that will prove most useful to those that use the library. The rules of the Supreme Court library are given, and there is also a regnal table to ascertain the dates of Acts of Parliament, the roll of barristers and solicitors of the Supreme Court of New Zealand, Ofcago and Southland District, and a list of Judges of the Supreme Court for the same Districts. The losses sustained by the various Insurnnce Companies through the late fire at Messrs Guthiie and Larnach's have, we be lieve, been all met. At first, we hear, there was some slight delayj there having, it is said, been an understanding on Monday among the agents interested that payments shou'd not be made until the following day. The agent of one Company, however, resolved that ha would pay at once, and proceeded on Monday afternoon to the office of Messrs Guthrie and Larnach, cheque in hand. To hi* surprise, when he got there he found two other agents who were parties to the "vi » derstanding," both bent on a similar errand. Messrs tfre, Williamson, and Booth's new woollen factory at the, Kaikorai is being supplied with all its shafting and gearing by Messrs Fraser, Wishart, and Buchanan, of the Railway Foundry. One casting consists of a cog-wheel, 10ft. in diameter, and weighing 32cwt.' This is claimed to be the ]arget>t cog-wheel casting in one piece ever made in Otago. The latter firm is also manufacturing a dozien ballast trucks similar to a number we described not long ogo, and which discharge in the centre and at each end, the trucks so constructed being foxind to answer well. Messrs Fraser, Wishart, and Buchanan are also making the plant of two saw* mills for a firm ia Canterbury. From a return published in the Govern* ment Gazette of the 13th inst, the value of imports at the several ports of New Zealand during the quarter ending SOth June, 1874, was £1,860,701, against £1,690,655 for the corresponding quarter of 1873. Of this amount, £552,965 was to Dunedin, against £561,852 for the corresponding quarter of last year. The value of the exports from the several ports of New Zealand for the quarter ending 30th June, 1874, was £1,515,486, against £1.043,072 for the corresponding quarter of 1873. Of this amount, £422,353 was from Dunedin, as against £437,461 for the corresponding quarte/ last yeai*. The following nre items concerning the Roslyn and Kakotui districts j— Th<- Roslyn and Kaikorai Institute have resolved to proceed at once with the work of enlarging its hall. At the last meeting of the Institute a paper was read by the President on " Nature in Motion," and the subject is to be continued at the next meeting by the "Vice-pre* sident. — The annual statutory meeting of the Roslyn Road Board was held on Wednesday. The orsly business done was the election of Chairman, and Mr A. H. Ross was unanimously elected Chairman for the current year. — The Kaikorai School Committee has resolved to appoint a second master in the room of Mr Anderson, who has resigned iv consequence of ill-health, The Dean of Canterbury (says the South Canterbury Times) has had to defend him* self because of his having partaken of the Communion with his Dissenting brethren at the Conference in New York, nnd right nobly has he done it, in such words as the following :—": — " It is a painful thing that the community to which I belong should be so narrow in their views, as that they should not see that there is something greater than any one particular community and Church, and that is the universal Church of Christ, In the Apostles' Creed we profess our belief in the Catholic—that is, the UniversalChurch. That idea was realised at thia Communion. It was no longer any one par* ticular Church ; no longer any apecial branch of the Church j it was the whole of the Church of Christ that there met together in order to profess their belief in the deatn of the Lord who died to save the eouls, flot merely of one denomination or of another, but qi »J1 th W e wh9 put their fwtfc in Mm/

I

We are very glad to say, writes the Lake Wakatip Mail, that the anticipated heavy loss from sheep, owing to the late unparalleled and protracted winter season and heavy enow falls, is not likely to be realised. Old ewes have mainly suffered, and so have lambs. The loss will be above the average of the usual winter ; but not so as to cause any alarm. Sheep and cattle owners are beginning to look more wistfully at the question of feed. Tho hard continued dry frosts, it is thought, have done considerable injury both to natnral growth and artificial sown grasses. We hope the prophets may again be mistaken in this We are informed, says the Arrow Observer, that while in Dunedin, Mr Pritchard met with much encouragement in the matter of the proposed voollen factory at Hayes Creek, the general opinion being that the scheme was one worthy of support. In the district itself, many influential and wealthy men have pwnv'sed to take large interests in the new industry, and there is no doubt when it is placed on the market it will be Juickly and successfully floated. We unerstand it ha 9 been decided to let the matter stand over for a little, the money market being rather tight at tho present time. When things l r ok a bit brighter, the details of the concern will ba placed before the public. Patrick Walsh and Edward Johnson, late seamen on board the Scimitar, were received into the Gaol on Saturday night from Oamaru. They were, on the 13th inst., by Mr Parker, R.M., committed for trial at thß ensuing sessions of the Supreme Court at Dunedin, on the charge of forging an order for the delivery of goods, with intent to defraud Joseph Moss, of Oamaru. John Harrington was received into the Gaol on Saturday, under escort from Tokomairiro. He stands committed for trial at the coming sittings of the District Court at that place, by Mr Maitland, R.M., m a charge of stealing from the person of Charles Gray, at Tokomairiro, a silvereetV^ °°[ J J « lithe value of £9. We are very glad to be ahle to state that the valuable collection of shells brought by the barque Viotorine from the Mauritius has been bought for the Museum by the following gentlemen :— Messrs D. F. Main, J. M'Kerrow, J. M'Gregor, Gunn and Ross, W. D. Murison, J. T. Thomson, J. Logan, J. Hislop, E. B. Carj?ill, R. I-. Livingston, J. Bathgate, — Sutherland, Robert Gillies, W. Hodgkins, A. W. Morris, Keith Ramsay, R. Wilson, J. Neill and Co., J. M. Ritchie, Charles Nichols, Driver, Stewart, and Co., Hogg and Hutton, J. Mackerras, L. O. Beale. A. C. Strode, Capt. Wain, J. Chaplin, Hill Jack, P. Barker, J. Mitchell, H. Tewsley, W. D. Stewart, and Matheson Bros. A sad story reaches us (Sonthern Cross) from Waiuku, exhibiting a most repugnant phase of Maori life, that may well call for the intervention of the philanthropist. It seems that amongst other habits and customs still retained by the natives the de?ertion of their aged and infirm kinsfolk is still a common and recognised practice. We are informed by our correspondent at Waiuku that the dead body of a Maori weman of advanced as»e was discovered in a state of nudity, lying in a delapidated whare, by Mr Ernest King. The poor creature, whose name was Ripeka Paremikwae, had been callously left to her fate by her relatives. What that fate was is recorded in the verdict of the coroner's jury who enquired into the cau cc—"c c— " Want of the common necessaries of life," in other words, starvation. We cull the following mining items, touching the Thames Gold ti elds, from the New Zealand Herald :— The yield of the Bright Smile mine for the fortnight ending thf Bth inst. was 89 3oz. of melted gold. The prospects of the mine are very promising, rich stone being found in the lowest levels opened. — The Old Whau mine is looking np again, good stone having been come upon in a cross drive. — The new reef in the Old Mannka continues to yield richly. 980oz of melted gold were obtained from a reoent crushing. The lode is large, with gold scattered all through it. Arrangements have been made with the Golden Crown Company to wind for the mine. — Central Italy, Crown Prince, and Bird in Hand, continue on gold — The news from other mines is quite unimportant. T.he Wickliffe Terrace crossing place of the railway at Port Chalmers is undergoing much needed improvement at the hands of a section of the hard-labour gang. Both road and side paths are being levelled and metalled, and the approach to the Masonic Hall on the railway side thereby rendered very much more traversable. But even after the hardlabour men have finished the work now in hand the crossing place will continue imperfect until an alteration is effected in the exceedingly awkward side gates of the footpath. We imagine that the designer of those gates must have borne the fair sex a grudge, for anything of the kind quite so awkward for a lady to pass through we have never seen put to public uses under the name of a convenience. Old fashioned turnstiles would be infinitely preferable. Mr Asher, of Port Chalmers, Secretary to the Committee appointed to collect subscriptions on behalf of the widow and children of Mr Osborne, who died reoßnfcly;* wrote to thn Secretary of the Press Amateur Dramatic Club last week, asking the Club to give a performance in aid of the widow and orphans. A reply was forwarded to Mr Asher, stating that while the Club sympathised with the object he had in view, they could not render the assistance asked. It had been determined at a meeting of the Club, held last week, that owing to the number of applicationa of a similar nature which had been received, as the Club could not play for all, it would be invidious to select one in preference to another, and therefore the Olub must deoline to play for any under such circumstances. We are sorry (says the Dunstan Times) to hear that up to the present the Pneumatic Dredge has been unsuccessful in its search for the golden mineral. The machinery, we learn, is now, after some slight hitch, working smoothly, and is in every respect well adapted for the work. The cylinder has been sunk and the bottom of the river reached in a good many places, but without the desired result. However, as there is any j distance of the rivei bed still untried, there i

is hope of the undertaking proving a remunerative one. The Salamander steam spoon dredge is for the present idle, the engines being under repair. The ground she is on has proved highly payable ; there is consequently every reason to suppose that when in full work sufficient gold will be obtained to make up for all lost time.

The annual meeting ©f the Palmorston Road Board was held at the office of the Board on the 19th inst. Members present : Messrs W. A. Young (Chairman) ; W. Cochrane, G. Ross, A. Hepburn, E. Swallow, J. Service, J. Milne, R. Hunter, and D. Fleming. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. A letter from Mr Miller was read and referred to the Engineer for his opinion. Mr John M'Bryde, Auditor, presented his report, and certified that he had examined the bank-book and vouchers of tho Palmerston Road Board, nnd found them correct. It wa3 resolved that the Auditor's report be adopted. The following tenders were opened for Contract No. 13:— D. Philip, £63 7s; G. Cruikshanks, £47. It was proposed by Mr JR. Hunter, and seconded by Mr G. Ross, that the tender ofG. Cruikshanks be aooepted. The meeting adjourned to the third Wednesday in April.

We understand that a gentleman who is on a visit to the Colony for the good of his health, and who is connected with the Portland penal establishment, having heard of the system of prison labour in Otago, made some enquiries on the subject with the following results :— A gang of 30 immigrants were at work at a spot on Bell Hill from which a gang of 13 prisoners had a day or two before been transferred— the 13 prison ers working seven hours a day (the hours of labour are seven per day in summer and nine in winter) — actually sent out two more waggon loads of material per day than the 30 im-P migrauts did — the immigrants working eig^t hours to the prisoners' seven. A fact like this, while it speaks for what is being done by prison labour, also shows the wretched physique of many of the immigrants with whom Dr Featherston is flooding the Colony.

The following is from the Wellington correspondent of the Canterbury Press :— "The Ward-Chapman plot thickens. Six witnesses arrived by the Phoebe, on Saturday. Rumour says that the Committee have got fair hold of the tangled skein, and are proceeding to unravel it. A lady, resident at Oamaru, has a son in the Telegraph office there. The boy tells his mother something. She repeats it, and ultimately it is forwarded to the Daily Times through the medium of its Oamaru correspondent — a gentleman named Brown. Some strange revelations were made before the Committee to-day, and scandal formed a prominent part. Mr Macassey's and a lady witness's evidence, if printed, will be very entertaining. It is understood that the Committee is in a position to trace the leakage ; therefore there is no necessity for Mr Murison to come up." With reference to the report of the WardChapman Committee, we have received the following telegram from Wellington : — " The Ward -Chapman Committee's report is regarded favourably. The disclosures made by the evidence have been of so extraordinary a character that the Committee recommends that the evidence should be sup« pressed pending further inquiry. The manner in which the telegrams originally passed into circulation still remains a mystery. The second telegram published by you contains a sentence taken from a message sent by Judge Ward from Dunsandel (Canterbury) to Fox, Vogel's secretary. But for this the Committee might have seen its way to some definite conclusions as to the source from which the telegrams originally emanated. The advanced stage of the session rendered it impossible to secure the attendance of further witnesses."

Four men had a pretty lively "rough and tumble " nght near Anderson's Bay on Sunday. We were first made aware of the occurrence by a brawny and battered-looking individual who waR washing his wounds in a pool by the roadside. He had a nasty cut on the lef j temple, whioh he said was done list week. Another cut on the top of his head was done, he said, by a policeman a few days ago. A black eye and sundry other marks were the work of a man he had just been fighting. This man took the matter very quietly, and told us we would find his mate up the road. The mate was discovered under a hedge in a doubled-up condition, having received a violent prod in the abdomen with a loose rail from a fence close by. We could not ascertain how the fight originated, the vanquished being rather reticent, while the victors were disappearing over a hill in the distance.

The Government is taking steps for the widening and diverting of about two and a half miles of that portion of the Main Road to the Clutha, passing through Popotunoa Gorge, and which is one of the most dangerous parts of the road. The road is to be widened to the width of 26ft. and metalled. As the road crosses the Kuriwao Stream twice, the contract will also include the erection of two bridges. ' The abutments and wing walls of these will be of masonry, and the superstructure of timber in 40ft. spans. As most of the work will be through ground of a rocky nature, the stone for the bridges and metalling will be obtained from the various cuttings. These alterations will be appreciated by the travelling public. A number of other bridges on the same road will b9 shortly opened for tender.

Our country reporter, who arrived at Clyde on Wednesday, telegraphs :— "The fro9t appears to have entirely broken up, and the roads are good all the way from Dunedin. Out of the 40 immigrants sent up to Naseby to work at the new head-race, many are on their way back to Dunedin ; many of them never went near the works. The miners have, to a man, ample supply of water ; and men, for mining and agricultural work, are scarcely to be had. The pneumatic dredge at Clyde, owing to the tightening of the moorings by a rise in the river Molyneux, canted over, and went down by the head. Nearly one half of the barge sustaining the machinery is under water. Efforts are being made to float it.— The Clyde coal-pit is again in workiug order, and coals are being deliveredatthe pit's mouth.— Farm labourers are much in demand. Mr Benjamin Naylor, the Mayor, informs me that twenty eligible immigrants, accustomed to this work, would

find employment at good wages. — An amusing case of elopement took place on Saturday. The wife — only sixteen years of age — of a Chinaman ran away from her husband at Queenstown. The husband followed her on horseback, and surprised the fugitive while on her way to Dunedin by coach. On Monday, both returned to Clyde, when the lady positively refused to have anything more to do with her liege lord.

Additional lock-up accommodation has been provided at the Port Chalmers Police Station by erecting a building 12ft. by 10ft. dos-a-dos with the old lock-up, The new building was vory much required, but even now the luck-up accommodation is far from what it ought to be. It may be briefly described as three cells, of which the two smaller are each about 9ft. long by sft. wide, and the larger, 12ft. long by 10ft. wide. As many as seven persons have been confined at a time in one ot the smaller celk, and if for the sake of argument we assume that they were all disposed to recumbent positions, each man's share of the available space would be only one foot three inches and a fraction for width by five feet for length. A new Police Station at the Port has long time been talked about, but the probability of the idea receiving practical effect appears to be as remote as ever it was.

Two years have now elapsed since the Chain Hills tunnel has been commenced, but such have been the unforeseen difficulties encounteied at the approaches that comparatively little progress hai been uiade. On the Dunedin side it will be some months before the mouth can be attained, in consequence of the landslips blocking the entrance. Un the Taieri side, however, better progress has been effected, the tunnel being substantially built with brick and mortal* so far as it has been excavated. On either side the rails are laid to the works, and the dilapidated stone bridge over Abbot's Creek is being temporarily propped for the convey ance of a million of brioks, which have been manufactured on ground close to the station. By the time the tunnel ia finished, however, it is very probable the line will be in full working order from, the Taieri to the terminus.

"Attious," in the Melbourne reader, recounts the following!— -"At some of the stations on the North-eastern line the train only stops when there is a passenger who wishes to be fiet down there. The other day an old gentleman, as he entered a first-class carriage at Spencer street, asked the guard to be very particular to tell him when they got to Beveridge. At Essendon the traveller put his head out of the window and asked, 'Is this Beveridge.' 'No, sir,' replied the guard, 'I'll tell you when we get there.' The same question was repeated, and the same reply made at all the stations along the line. At last the guard, opening the door, and addressing the traveller, exclaimed, 1 This is BeverJdge, sir ; look sharp ; train five minutes behind time.' 'Oh I thank you very maoh, but I don't want to get out ; only my daughter told me that I was to take my pills when wo got to Baveridge, and I always like to be exact.' "

The following instance of rapid execution of work deserves to be chronicled : — Mr John Campbell has a contract from the Government for the construction of 100 goods waggons. Some waggons were lately pressingly wanted at the Dunedin Station j so it was agreed to give Mr Campbell a bonus if he made ten waggons within fourteen days. He undertook to do the work, and the ten waggons were running on the railroad before the end of the thirteenth day. In this time all the wood work pertaining to them was obtained and put together, and the waggons were painted. The Government supplied the iron work, in whioh (alterations being made in the plan of the waggons) considerable changes had to be effeoted. Another agreement has been entered into with Mr Campbell for the manufacture of tan more in twelve days ; and from the success of his former undertaking, it is probable that in this case he will also come up to time.

During the hearing of an assault case at the R. M. Court the other day, a learned counsel argued that certain allowances should be made to persons who displayed their muscular abilities under provocation. He mentioned that in a school conducted by Dr. Waugh, in Ireland, some years ago, the boys were habitually carrying tales to the master. The consequence was that not one manly boy remained atthat school, and the learned counselleft after having been there three weeks. Being under the imoression that the same rule was in force at* the next school he attended, counsel, on one occasion, informed the schoolmaster that a boy had improperly conducted himself. The master immediately called the culprit, upon whose back he placed the learned counsel, and gave him (counsel) the " soundest thrashing he ever had in his life." Counsel never told tales again after that. The narration of the incident caused some amusement.

Another cargo of railway sleepers of questionaole quality — the product of the pine forests of Vancouver Island — arrived the other day in the barque Colusa. We have it on good authority that such timber is never used by our American cousins for railway sleepers, the wood being too light and unenduring, and is moreover particularly susceptible to the evil influence of water. It very soon rots away in damp ground. We should like to be informed why material that is rejected in America should be considered good enough for New Zealand? There is plenty of very much better timber in New Zealand for the purposes to which thesa yellow pine sleepers are to be applied, and if that is not sufficiently durable there is an inexhaustible Bupply to draw upon in the forests of Australia. It is to be hoped that nastiness is not to be introduced in the construction of our grand railway system, especially as there is not the slightest probability of its being accompanied by the usual cheapness as a set-off.

A large portion of that superior farm lately purchased by Mr Larnach at Green Island is now being surveyed into business sites and villa residences. The situation is highly eligible, being intersected by the branch railway from Saddle Hill, and fronting the Main South Road. Efforts are going to be made to have the branch railway station in the township contiguous to Mr

33agerty's Hotel ; and there is no doubt from the proapeot of a large population being located there, the prayer of the inhabitants will be readily granted. On his return from Melbourne, Mr A. Brown contemplates surveying a large portion of his farm into villa residences near the station, and from its favourable position and proximity to ooal, it cannot fail to attract purchasers. It is also probable that others whose lands are contiguous to the Main South Road will place them ere long in the market for townships, so that the public who have any desire to reside in the district will have ample opportunities to select freeholds.

Another important case was brought before the Waite Lauds Board on Wednesday. The Chief Commissioner had refused payment for a certain section granted to Messrs Donald and Matheson,at the previous meeting, the minutes of which were confirmed. The reason adduced was that the section had been revscrved for depasturing purposes, and was likely to prove of immense value to the mining interest. Mr Harris appeared on behalf of the applicants, and a lively discussion took place. Mr Butterworth'a motion, that the former decision of the Board be confirmed, was lost by the casting vote of the Chairman. Mr Harris declared his intention to take further proceedings. An application to settle a number of German immigrants in the Waihola township could not be agreed to. The Board has adopted an excellent regulation, whioh will greatly facilitate the business. It provides that all subjects for consideration at each meeting must be entered before 4p. m. on the previous Tuesday. A report of the proceedings appears elsewhere.

The following particulars regarding the Dunedin and Olutha Railway will no doubt prove acceptable to our readers :— There are now 27 miles of rail laid. Rail laying is now going on at three different points, and at each of these places a mile of it oan be done. It is confidently expected that, by the middle of November, it will be possible to go from Dunedin to Bilclutha and back by rail in six or seven hours. The Taieri and the Waihola bridges and the Chain Hills tunnel will not be finished then, but theae wi Ibe the only gaps on the line. There are two locomotives at work ballasting — one at Waihola, and tho other at the Clutha end. A. third will be at work ballasting at the Taieri in the course of a few wee^s, when the reclamation at the Dunediu Station is completed, being at present employed at that work. The passenger station at Tokoraairiro is finished, and the one at Kaitungata Road, which for the present will be the terminus of the line, will be finished in a few weeks. We understand that the other stations will now be built as fast a3 possible.

As will be Been by our telegrams, Sir James Fergusson has resigned his position as Governor of this Colony, and is to be succeeded by the Marquis oi" Normanby, the present Governor of Queensland, Sir James Fergusson took office as Governor of this Colony on the 14th of June, 1873. His resignation has not taken us by surprise, as it hag been pretty generally believed for some time past that he would resign his office and return to England, to take again an active part in Imperial politics. Sir James Fergusson represented the County of Ayr in the Conservative interest, in the House of Commons, from December 1854, to December 1857, and from October 1859, to 1868. From June 1866, to July 1867, h« was Under-Secretary for India under Lord Derby's Government, and from the lastmentioned date to August 1868, he was Under-Secretary for the Home Department under Mr Disraeli's Government, when he was appointed Governor of South Australia, and sworn in as a member of the Privy Council.

In another column will be found the prospectus of the Southern Hotel Company, Limited. The capital of the company is to be £40,000, in 40,000 shares of £t eioh, of which amount it is proposed to call up ten shillings per share, on easy terms to shareholders. There are fifteen Provisional Directors, all well-known citizens, whose names are published. The prospectus states thab the company is formed for the purpose of erecting in Dunedin a first class hotel, similar to those existing in the large cities of Europe and America — one that will not only supply existing requirements, but will offer inducements to tourists and travellers to visit this part of New Zealand. It is proposed to build a hotel with 200 bedrooms, and other neoessary accommodation. The cost of the freehold land and building is estimated at £29 000 and the furniture and fittings at £6000, thus making the total outlay required £35,000. To meet this a capital of £20,000 will be sufficient, as the balance can be borrowed at a moderate rate on the security of the land and buildings. For further particulars we refer those interested to the prospectus.

It is always gratifying to note additions to the machinery of the large manufactories of Dunedin. Messrs Sparrow and Co. will have on their new premises on the reclaimed laad a quantity of new machinery in addition to that in use on their present premises. Among the new plant calling for notice is a strong double-geared self acting slide screw cutting and surfacing gap-lathe. There is also a planing machine, with a new selfacting improvement, to plane 6ft. long, 3ft. 6in. wide, and 3ft. 6in. high, and with it all the necessary tools. A steam-hammer, to be erected, will be capable of giving a stroke up to five tons. The engine and boiler to be used on the premises now being erected will be new. The boiler will be 16ft. long, 4ft. Bin, diameter, and fitted with 45 three-inch tubes. The engine is to be of ten horseSower nominal. The boiler may seem to be isproportionately large, but the reason is that it has to supply steam for more things than the engine, steam being taken direct from it for working the steam hammer, four forges, and a blast. A new department will be added to the business in the shape of a moulding shop, and a large cupola is to be erected so as to allow of castings being made. Business will be carried on in the new premises in the course of a fortnight.

At so rapid a rate is the township of Balclutha at present progressing (says the Clutha Leader) that both carpenters and timber are at a premium, the supply of both being utterly inadequate to meet the demands. Houses are scarcely to be had to let either

for love or money, and rents are very high. We understand many parties are anxious to build, but a^e unable to find either material or labour. Amongst the many hundreds of immigrants who have arrived of late, it seems reasonable to suppose there may he a considerable number of carpenters, and if so, they at least have no reason to be a day out of work, considering the state of matters here and in many other up-country towns. So far as Balclutha is concerned, we have no doubt work of tho class referred to will be plentiful for years to come, as unquestionably, when the railway is opened to town, the demand for house accommodation here will be largely increased. Apart from the building trade, other classes of labourers are much in demand ; and were the Government to erect a few working men's cottages here, instead of confining their operations in this respect to Dunedin, and thus encouraging new arrivals to hang about town idle and discontented, they would iind plenty of work and plenty of pay. It would be well that the Government should make enquiry into the matter, and act as they see right.

The adjourned annual meeting of the Cavflrsham Road Board was held in the Schoolhouße on Monday evening. Present : Messrs Carey, U'Ren, Bridgmun, Rutherford, Wilson, Jones, and Jackson, Mr Rutherford was re elected Chairman, and Mr Bridgman Treasurer, for the current year ; and Mr Cameron was appointed Clerk, and Mr Davison Assessor ' and Collector. The members for the Middle Subdivision reported that they had accepted Mr Booker's tender for 300 yards of rotten rock, at 4a 6d per yard, to be broken and spread on Park street, Kensington, and their action was approved of. The Clerk was instructed to write to Major Atkinson, and call his attention to the fact that the Rifle Range at Anderson's Bay is intersected by a district road, and that complaints have been made that firing across ifc is attended with danger to passengers. The contractors for the railway workshops wrote offering to subscribe £9 in aid of the formation of about seven chains of Hill-sido Road It was resolved to accept the offer, and complete the work. The Inspector was instructed to procure drain-tiles for making a ditch across the Btreefc from Kenaiugfcon towards the Recreation Ground. Mr Carey paid to the Treasurer a further contribution in aid of ditches along Seaflold Road. Tne Board adjourned till Thursday, 17th September.

The followers of glass-eye polishing and various other strange occupations peculiar to large centres of population, whom J)r Featherston has considerately east upon the Province at the worst time of the year, do not take kindly to colonial roughing aud hard work. Of the thirty-three immigrants lately sent by the Government to Naseby, eight have returned to town, and on Wednesday called on the Immigration authorities in Dunedin complaining bitterly of the manner in which they were treated up there. They worked only half a day on the ohannel works. They wanted eight shillings a day, which the contractor declined to give to them, and offered them piece-work, which they would not accept, and came back to Dunedin. It maybe pretty fairly assumed that these men cannot do hard work they have nover been accustomed to, as, had they been able to do the amount of work usually done for eight shillings per day, wo beheve it would have been to the interest of the contractor to have given them that sum, It is rather hard to get at the facts, but it seems that those who returned do nob like doing the day's work usually done by a labourer here, or to live in a tent. We believe some if not all of them had their passages paid to Naseby, and were to repay the Government the amounts out of their wages, and there being no wages from which to deduct these sums, they will probably form a straw of the Colonial debt' load.

One of the most successful anniversary gatherings we have lately seen, was held on Wednesday in Sfc George's Hall, in celebration of the 12th anniversary of the Lodge of Dunedin, 1.00. F. The entertainment consisted of. a soiree and dauce, which latter appeared to be by far the inoßt attractive item. The hall was literally covered — sides and ceiling-— with flaga and pennants, taste* fully arranged ; and theae, with the manycoloured regalias worn by the officers of the Lodge of Dunedin and sister Lodges, made up a very attractive scene. The tea and refreshments, to whioh over 200 people eat down, were provided in Brother Donaldson's best style, and, to judge by the speed with which the viands were made to disappear by old and young alike, they must have been good. After tea, the tables were cleared, and the room prepared for dancing, for which the following excellent band had been engaged : — Mr Bailey, violin ; Mrs Clutsam, pianoforte ; Mr Wright, piccolo ; and Mr Keys, cornet. The votaries of Terpsichore, of whom there were many, indulged their favourite amusement, with a seeming spirit of thorough enjoyment, until the small hours of the morning. Ifc was stated that, during the course of the past year, eight new members had been initiated, and the fund, of the Lodge raised to the sum of £500, while, as a set-off to this, two widows, unfortunately, were on the Benefit List. In concluding our notice, we would recommend the Committee to make some arrangements by which, after this, ladies will not be kept standing about the floor, while the majority of the seats are occupied by unmannerly men. and boys.

An ordinary meeting of the Dunedin School Committee was held in Mr S. James's office last week, at which there were present — Mr C. H. Street (in the chair) Messrs Stout, Livingston, Prosser, Robin, Wright, Hay, and James (Secretary). A communication was read from Mr Halliwell, Headmaster of the Middle District School, relative to a complaint of the Committee concerning the management of some of its adjuncts ; the writer stating that it always had and would be his earnest endeavour to carry out the instructions of the Committee in a proper manner. The exphnation was deemed satisfactory. Mr E. M. Statham, secretary to the British Heart of Oak Good Templar Lodge, wrote requesting a room in the North Dunedin School for evening meetings. Mr Livingston considered they would form a bad precedent by acceding to this request. It would be different for charitable or educational purposes, but if the Good

f**

Templars gained possession the Orange Lodge or Hibernian Catholic Benefit Society might also reasonably make a similar request. Obher members spoke in a similar strain, and it was resolved to refuse the application. Mr John Allen was appointed janitor of the Albany street school. The head-master, Mr Montgomery, wrote stating that 177 children at present attended, and the numbers were daily added to. He suggested the appointment of two pupil teachers, and recommended Miss Mollison and Mr A. Johnston for the posts. The matter was referred to the Education Board. Several accounts having been rendered, the meeting closed. While regretting that, owing to continued ill-health, the Province is likely to lose the services for a time of Mr Wilson Gray (says the Waikouaiti and Shag Valley Herald) we are glad to find that the intense application and untiring zeal which he has brought to bear in the discharge of his high and important judicial duties, and which have seriously undermined his health, are duly recognised by the General Government, and that a draft Bill has been introduced into the House of Representatives, recommending a retiring allowance to him. As a valued, conscientious, and painstaking public servant, this consideration is well deserved, and we are sure it will give to all who know Mr Gray, and have witnessed those nice points of honour and justice which usually characterise his decisions, and do credit to his head and heart, the highest satisfaction. Whether presi-ling as a Resident Magistrate in the Extended Jurisdiction Courts or on the goldfields as District Judge, where his decisions have given uniform satisfaction, Mr Gray's absence will be felt and deeply regretted, both by his brother Magistrates, the members of the Bar, and litigants themselves, amongst whom his urbanity of manner and gentleness of disposition have rendered him a feneral favourite. We sincerely hope that Ir Gray's contemplated absence may be the means of completely restoring him to health. Our Lawrence correspondent writes : — "There has been little of public interest stirring here lately, and about the chief topic of conversation has been in regard to the report of the Committee in reference to the management of the Hospital. When the public failed to obtain a hearing in the matter they went away thoroughly dissatisfied, and many have made up their minds to abandon any attempt to sift matters, with perfect disgust. It was at one time thought that the officials would demand an investigation, so as to obtain a clearance from the report of the Committee {if they considered the same unjust), but such has not been the case. As matters now Btand, if that report be correct, then the money which the public have subscribed might have been put to a better use, and have tended more to succour those who were so unfortunate as to require assistance in illness. If, on the other hand, the Committee have wrongly reported on the matter, then what faith can the public have in the actions of such a Committee for the future 1 And in either event it would appear likely that the sick and poor will be the sufferers from the paucity of subscriptions, which is the result of such a state of things. It would be far better that a full investigation were encouraged, for then the right would prevail. A Chinaman died suddenly at the Chinese Camp on Thursday week; and there has been another sudden death at the Blue Spur, in the person of the wife of a miner named Horton. The respected wife of Mr Thomson, Bailiff of the R. M. Court, died on Thursday week, after an illness of nearly three weeks, leaving five young children, A large procession attended the funeral to the Cemetery. Our Wellington correspondent telegraphs as follows : — "A meeting of the Opposition held on Tuesday in the Provincial buildings was attended by twenty-four members, and four others were unavoidably absent. It was resolved to form a New Zealand Constitutional Association, and after that 1 the meeting adjourned for a few days. Mr Eitzherbert, in moving his resolutions, will abstain from all irritating subjects, and will only very briefly insist on the necessity of appealing to the country before making any Constitutional changes. In the Legislative Council on Tuesday, M r Bonar obtained a recommittal of the Licensing Bill, to reconsider the amendment, to the effect that licenses shall only be granted at annual meetings of the Licensing Benches. The Council refused to alter their amendment. The Otago Waste Lands Bill has passed the Council. The members of the Legislature entertain the Governor at a farewell banquet on Friday. The banquet takes place in the House of Representatives. Several members refused to join. The prorogation will probably take place on Saturday if the Council cau be hurried up. Mr Shepherd introduced the Clyde Water Works Bill on Tuesday, authorising the Corporation to raise £2000. It is doubtful if time will allow the Bill to pass through the Council, but every effort will be made to carry it. The Goldfields River Pollution Bill is being strongly opposed in the Council. The second reading is on the Paper for a date, probably after the prorogation, but an attempt will' be made to get it read without delay. The Distilleries Act Amendment Bill, doing away with the differential excise duty, and providing for compensation for existing distillers, was passed in the House. Mr Macandraw protested against it, as putting an end t© local industry, and Mr O'Conor protested against it, as it Avould offer inducements for illicit distillation. The Bill was passed without a division." Another Welliugton correspondent telegraphei as follows on Saturday :— Mr Wacerhouse opposed the second reading of the Loan Bill in a powerful speech. He Baid the indebtedness of the Colony was eighteen-and-a-half millions, and contrasted our revenues with thoso of the Australian Colonies, and drew deductions most unfavourable to New Zealand. He said it was an illusion to suppose that the prevailing prosperity was due to the works policy. He demonstrated that it was mainly owing to the rise in wool, which affected other Colonies, but this in a greater degree. He admitted that our present revenue was large, but it would not suffice to meet current expenditure if honestly brought face to face with the expenditure. While willing to give the policy

necessary help, he should exercise such controlling power as to prevent Government launching into liabilities not contemplated when the scheme was sanctioned. He was willing to grant three millions for railways, because the sum was needed. The vote to a deep sinking company was unnecessary, and not of a character Government should give as a vote to the goldfields. It was a huge mistake, and all other votes should be borne out of the revenue. With regard to immigration, he said that the number on the way out was more than sufficient to meet the requirements of the Colony. The labour market was already overstocked. He urged the Council to exercise caution. It depended on them whether they kept within the bounds of prudence or supported the borrowing, and so involved themselves in an expenditure that would be disastrous to the Colony at large. Mr Holmes also attributed the prosperity to the rise in wool, and prognosticated that if there was over-speculation in the Colony financial ruin must follow. The proposal to raise the loan by short date*l debentures was merely gambling. Mr Grace made an eloquent speech in favour of the Bill. Messrs Campbell, Robinson, Chamberlain, and Bonar spoke in support, and Messrs Johnston. Kenny, and Mantell against. Mr Chamberlain created much amusement, saying that he was prepared to effect the borrowing o fifty millions if necessary.

The Wellington correspondent of the Bruce Herald supplies that journal with the following items of news, under date Mondaylast — "The Government cannot see their way clear to make the Coal Railway ; they want money, and there are disputes among themselves. The Bill has passed for purchase of the Bluff and Winton line in the Upper House. It is rumoured that they intend to insist on deducting the amount from the Pmvincial indebtedness, instead of allowing it for the construction of new lines. This is caused by the jealousy of petty Provinces, who wish to bring Otago down to their own level. — It is expected that the session will close on Thursday or Friday.— Mr Macandrew leaves to morrow. I expect a meeting of Council will be called to consider the position. The Colonial Industries Committee recommend a bonus of £1500 for producing 50 tons of grey or wrapping paper, and £1000 for 50 tons of printing paper, before the 30th June, 1876. For pottery, £300 for the first L2OOO worth suitable for household purposes, until the 30bh June, 1876. The Northern members wish only to have the first part of the resolutions in the Bill next session, which is opposed by Canterbury and Otago. It was agreed to let it stand as passed, the Northern members reserving the right to oppose next session. The Seat of Government at Wellington and the Compact nf 1856 were the only resolutions unanimously agreed to. They will close the session as quickly as possible, and draw their honorarium, which is proposed to be increased by Mr Vogel to £150. and let them get away. I heard one hanger-on of the Government remark unintentionally, 'All the ether Go"vernment men are getting their screws raised, why should not we ?'— The new name for the Government is ' The Government of Slops.'— The taxation of Great Britain is £1 19 a ,per head ; New Zealand, £4 3s ; annual charge of the debt of the former, 17s ; latter, £2 12s, not including the additional four millions passed this session. The Government resident agents proposal carried great influence. The Ward -Chapman Committee, judging from the report, must have strong revelations. They recommend a Royal Commission. Some sneer at their labour. The gravity of the disclosures and charges preolude publication until fully investigated. The country will yet thank them, although the investigation had cost double what it has, which is greatly exaggerated. The purity and uprightness of the Bench in of more consequence than a few pounds. — It is supposed that Mr Stafford is going to join the Government, and Mr Vogel will oe Agent-General.— At a meeting of the opponents to Provincial Resolutions to-day, 27 were present. It was resolved that an association, to be called the Constitutionalist Association, be formed. Subscriptions to the amount of £400 were received, and others promised. It is intended to carry on an agitation in favour of Provincialism in each Province to influence the next election. Sir James Fergusson goes home aa early as possible. It has been resolved at a meeting of the members of both Houses to entertain him at dinner before his departure. If New South Waleß carries out the intention to carry on the San Francisco Service with temporary boats, New Zealand withdraws."

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News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 1187, 29 August 1874

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News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 1187, 29 August 1874

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