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SPORTING NOTES.

A chess tourney will be held at Vienna in ! connection with the International Exhibition, i Caraitacus has been purchased by the Russian G overnment, and has been sent to Crinavry, the Newmarket of Russia. The Marylebone Cricket Club have in contemplation a £200 Cup, to be played for by i six principal comities, the winner for three years to become the possessor. Kaiser, who is in the front rank for the Derby, was exercised for the first time on the 11th January, after a long rest. Kaiser, who had fallen behind Flageolet and Gang Forward in the betting, was again made first , favourite. An International Football Match between England and Scotland was to have been played on the Surrey Cricket Ground, London, on Saturday, March Bth. The rules of the match were to have been those of the Ruaby Football Union. j The Committee of the Surrey County Club have arranged a match between two sides of gentlemen, to take place at the ( )val j on Mouday, Tuesday, and "Wednesday, July 7th. Sth, and 9th, under the title of Universities /'. Gentlemen of England. A boxing match in London with kid gloves, arranged so as to leave raw knuckles , and joints, came off lately, and in its results was the exact fnc *'mule of a prize-tight. The entrance fee to the room Avas a guinea a head, and no standing place was to be found. A gentleman, Avho represented one side of the argument, received considerable punishment, and retired from the amusement with two ribs broken. His Royal Highness Prince Leopold, who recently graciously accepted the office of patron of the Aberdeen Golf Club, has intimated to the secretary of the Club that he intends to present a sil\*er challenge cup for competition. This royal mark of distinction cannot fail to be gratifying to the members. In addition to this, Mrs Dingwall Fordyce, of Bruckiay Castle, has kindly promised, to offer a ladies' cross to be competed for. William Thompson, ctHax " Bendigo," Avas recently arrested at Nottingham, England, charged Avith trespassing on the Midland railway, at Lenton. Ib seems that the defendant Avas found Avalking along the lino, evidently to tako the nearest cut to his home. While the Bench AA'ere deliberating as to Avhat course they should take, " Bendigo" leaned over the rail, and satirically remarked, •' Give me ten years." Their worships, howeA'er, Avere rather more merciful, for they discharged him on payment of a guinea,. The home papers record the death of Mr A. W. T. Daniel, the Arcll-known cricketer. Mr Daniel established his reputation as a first-class player at Harrow, and when subsequently at Cambridge he became the champion racquet player of the UniA^ersity, and Avas a successful competitor for many of the University athletic sports. He was no mean scholar, and had not death intervened it was anticipated that his steady application to his studies Avould have resulted in his gaining the laAV scholarship at Cambridge. A fareAvell dinner Avas given to Mr J. Tl. Selwyn, the new Bishop of Melanesia, son of the Bishop of Liclifield, at St. James's Hotel, on the 2Sth January, by some old Cantabs and rowing men, on the eve of his departure to Polynesia. A church plate-service Avas also presented, and from the jovial evening that passed, he will long remember the }ast gathering qf his friends before he ships for a foreign climate. Mr Selwyn rowed in the Eton Eight two years. He won the Pairs twice at Cambridge and once at Henley, Avith. K. A. Kinglake, and rowed in the '64 Cambridge crew as stroke. O'ook and Roberte hava been playing a couple of evenjngs at the $en and Chjfkene

Hotel, Manchester, Cook, on the first night, adding another large break to his already extensiA r e list, viz. , 390, in Avhich Avere 13 and 110 spot hazards in succession. The Champion won by 209 points, and lloberts's best run was 114. When they met on the following evening, Roberts was' more fortunate, and defeated Cook by 235 points. The chief runs were again accomplished by the famed spot hazard striker, and consisted of j 141 (30 spots), 122, 104, Avhilst Roberts was credited with 109 (27 spots). A correspondent of the Field says there I are so few pastimes in Avhich. ladies and gentlemen can join, that he is anxious to introduce into England the old Flemish game of Die Schleuderkegelbahn, or " slinging nine pins." Concerning this game, he remarks : — " It attracted my attention in G-ermany last season, and I Avas pleased to find that both English and foreign ladies of the highest rank are in the habit of joining in the game. The mos.t delicate ladies and gentlemen, old or young, can play it, although, as in the game of croijuet, to play in the first class requires great skill and patience." A writer in the London Sporting Gazette makes the following remarks about a year- ! ling colt by Blair Athol out of Coirnbra, now |at the Cobham stud. He is own brother to j Mr D. D. Withers's colt Stonehenge, now in 1 training for the Behnont Stakes :— " My first I impression on entering the box of the bay | colt by Blair Athol out of Coimbraby KingI ston, Avas that I had neA r er seen so fine a . horse at the age ; and the resemblance to the j old pictures of the celebrated Flying Chil- ! ders struck me at once. Head in the air, neck Avell arched (though not the least peacocky), shoulders and quarters almost joining. Certainly I neA T er saw quarters go so j far into the back, or come out Avifch such a | 1 beautiful SAveep. Grand bone and excellent J joints ; in fact, lam now of the same opinion as I was Avhen first I saAV him — that he is , the best blood yearling I have ever seen in the month of January ; and if he does not turn out a ' clinker' I am no judge." The great coursing event, knewn as the " Greyhound Derby," takes place over the j Altcar plains, a few miles from Liverpool. I So important and popular has this event become of late years, that the betting on it among sporting men at this season completely overshadows even that of the Derby itself. A leading bookmaker declares that so many books are now opened on the Waterloo Cup that an owner" of a dog entered for it could easily back it, if so disposed, to Avin 250,000d01., so extensive are the betting operations on the race. This year Mr Blackstock's nomination, Peasant Boy, who ran second to the winner, Bed of Stone, last season, is the favourite, his price noAV being 10 to I. The entry of Lord Lurgan, Avho won the cup thrice with the famous flog Master M'Grath. a second favourite at 100 to (i ; those of Mr M'llutrie, Mr Lester, and Mr Briggs, 20 to 1 each ; and of Colonel Hathorn and Mr Salter, 22 to 1 each. The rumours that the Prince of Wales is about to take a prominent part on the Turf are showing something like substantiality. It is said that the royal stud AA'ill be trained at Danebury. It is also said that a Avell known trainer, on hearing the report, obserA'ed that he Avould not train for the Prince for £10,000 a year, because whenever a public favourite in the royal stable got beaten, insinuations and charges of foul play Avould be immediately brought against him. We (Graphic) once more express our regret at these rumours. The Prince, it is true, OAves a considerable part of his popularity to the interest he personally takes in all our lield sports and other pastimes, he ■will not add to it bj r mixing himself up with the Turf to a greater extent than he has already done. By such a course he is rather likely to make more enemies than friends. ' ' The Regent " did himself no good by racing. It has Avell been called the '• sport of kings ; " but kings are not Avell advised to keep racehorses. Last Aveek, Avhile the Xorth Berwickshire Hounds, s ys the Scotsman of a late date, Avere at Dunse Castle, a single hound Avas observed by Major Hay to leave the cover, eA'idently on the line of a fox. The toxes being so numerous, no notice Avas taken of the circumstance. However, about midday, a hound Avas seen to pass close to Millburn School at full cry, taking over Oatleycleugh Hill, and straight tor the farm of Abbey St. Bathans. Reynard took into a cover, but in less than ten minutes' time his gallant pursuer brought him out, when he breasted the Whitadder a little above Abbey St. Bathans farm steading, making for Barnside, and thence straight on to Bushelhill. Here fox and hound Avere last seen by a Lammermoor farmer, and foxy Avas only, somii three or four hundred yards ahead of the noble hound. The distance run at this stage Avas fully seven miles. We bclieA'e the hound's name was Watchman, one of the crack dogs in Mr Calder's splendid pack. During all the time the chase Avas seen both fox and hound were going at a rattling pace, and the latter never seemed to lose the scent for a moment. M. Barre, avlio for many years had been regarded as the champion tennis player of the Avorld, died at Paris on the 20th' January, at the advanced age of 72. Until quite recently lie has played in double matches, but his advanced a,ge has of late prevented his playing in single matches. For half a century M. Barre maintained the proud reputation of being the champion of the Avorld, never having been beaten even, and only one mail ever having the temerity to play him without receiving points. Old Philip Cox Avaa the man who was bold enough to tackle the champion at evens, and the match came off at the T^nnjs Court, St James's, ;

market, about the year 1829, and M. Barre Avas the victor, as his backers Avere satisfied he Avould be. In the early part of Barre's career he Avas a great favourite with all the members of the nobility who Avere patrons of the game of tennis, more particularly Avith the present Marquis of Clanricarde (himself at that time a first-rate player of the game) who used to take Messrs Barre, Marchazio, Louis, and the Cox's in his four-in-hand to Hampton Court to play matches. As a player and teacher of the game Barre was never excelled, and when in his prime could give the best player ever brought against him fifteen points, or one quarter of the game. A billiard match of considerable interest was commenced on Monday, the 27th January, in the Waverley Hall, Waterloo Place, Edinburgh, betAven W. Cook and J. Eoberts, jun. The match Avas played on a neAV table, specially built for the occasion by Messrs Morrison and Co., George street, that firm having offered as a prize a magnificent gold medal, to be awarded to the highest aggregate scorer in four games — tAvo of 1000 pomts and two of 750 each — at billiards. The first game of 1000 up was Avon by Cook, the game standing at the fiuish — Cook, 1001 ; Roberts, 741. The best break (245) Avas made by the Champion. The next game — one of 750 vp — AA'as Avon by Cook, by 516 points, his best breaks being 374 and 146. On the following day, however, the tables Avere turned, as Roberts won the second game of 1000 points by 405. In the course of play, Eoberts scored 194, 126, 120, and 126, the latter break being unfinished. Cook's highest break Avas 98. The last game was secured by Roberts, by 392 points. During the game he scored breaks of ISO and 260. The Chamj pion. however ne\ r er got into three figures. Reckoning up the scores of che four games, it was found that Roberts Avas the Avinner of _ Messrs Morrison and Co.'s gold medal by 22 points. The medal Avas presented by a wellknoAvn amateur to Roberts, who stated that he had never played on a better table. In a game of pyramids attenvards played, Roberts Avon six games to Cook's three. The following appears in a home paper :—: — "Among the entries for the late grand meeting at Cairo, Egypt, which took place on January 16 and 17, were two English racehorses, Countryman and Faliero. They were sent out by Sir George ChetAvynd, in charge of an English trainer and jockey, and arrived safely at Cairo. Both horses did well in their Avork, and Avere so highly thought of by the foreigners that an offer of £2200 was made for the pair by an ambitious Egyptian, desirous of Avinning the Khedive's grand prize, but the offer was declined. On the first day Faliero Avon a hurdle race, but Countryman Avas reserved for the Grand Prix on the folloAving day. When his trainer returned from the races, howeA'er, he found Countryman lyiDg down in his box, coA r ered Avith lather, foaming at the mouth and nostrils, and his jaws firmly set. A veterinary surgeon Avas called in, and he at once pronounced the horse to be poisoned. His throat had swollen to four times its natural size, and it was only by the administration of emetics and the application of strong blisters, that the horse's life Avas saA r ed. Of course Countryman was unable to run at the meeting, and was at once, sent back to England. No clue could be found to the perpetrator of this cowardly act, although every effort was made to discover him. tSuch affairs as this, fortunately, are few and far between, for they tend to loavci' the status of the turf. But, in any case, it Avill probably be some time before any one Avill inc«r the risk and expense of sending horses to a country where such practices obtain." The Avell-knoAvn jockey, James Robinson, paid the debt^of nature in January last, at the advanced age of 79. Robinson, who was brought up atXeAvmarket under Robson, the great trainer, got his first aaount in 1809, and won his first great race, the Derby, on Azor, in ISI7. He alson won the Derby on Cedric in 1524, on Middleton in 1825, on Mameluke in 1527, on Cadland in IS2B, and on Bay Middleton in 1836. It is said that in 1524 he took long odds that he would win the Derby and Oaks, and avouUl marry a Avife, all Avitbin a Aveek. He landed his bet, as on the Thursday he Avon the Derby on Cedric, on the Friday the won the Oaks on CobAveb, and on the Saturday lie married Miss PoAvell, of the Anglesey Ar/ns, a house of call for trainers and jockeys near St. James's. Although Robinson was a great speculator on the turf, his investments Avere never known to. interfere Avith his duty. In IS2S, when the Colonel and Uadland ran a dead heat for the Derby — the only one ever ran— Robinson stood to win £2500 by the Colonel, and £275 by Cadland. He rode the latter, and in the second heat Cadland won after a desperate race by half a length. Robinson Avon the St. Leger twice, and the Two Thousand more than half a, dozen times, including four years in suooession forLord Jersey ; the One Thousand Guineas four or five times, and other established stakes at meetings liko Epsom, Ascot, and GoodAvood. In 1552, when close upon sixty years of age, Robinson fell and broke his thigh, and has never ridden since. He hail not succeeded in saving any money, bmt through the exertions of Lord Clifden and others an annuity Avas provided for hitn upon Avhich he lived in tolerable comfort m his native town until his death, hi a notice of his career, an influential sporting journal concludes that Robinson was probably at all points the most perfect jockey ever known. | Another telegraph Avire is being extended betAveen Christchurch and Dur.edin, which ought to lead to increased despatch in thetransmission of telegrams between the two places,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18730419.2.22

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES., Otago Witness, Issue 1116, 19 April 1873

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2,698

SPORTING NOTES. Otago Witness, Issue 1116, 19 April 1873

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