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THE SUEZ MAIL.

The Suez mail brings late telegrams to the 10th May. Continual fighting had been going on in Paris since the mail left. The following is a summary of events :—: — On April 22nd, the Commune claimed to have recaptured the barricade at Neuilly. Preparations were being made by the in * s argents to resist a general attack by the Versailles troops. The complete investment of Paris waa projected. On April 24th, the opposing armies at Neuilly allowed the inhabitants to leave the to^n. The belligerents in Paris took advantage of the armistice to repair the barricades already erected, and construct others. Notice was given on ;he 26th to the Chemin de Fer dv Nord that the blockade of Paris had commenced, and that the conveyance of any kind of provisions must be stopped. Cannonading commenced violently along the whole line. Prince Bismarck, in the Reichsrath, declared that the Paris forts still held by the Prussians would only be surrendered after the final conclusion of peace, even if the first instalment of the indemnity bad not been previously paid. The French have paid the amount due for the maintenance of the Germans in France till the end of April. They propose to pay the indemnity principally in Rentes, which the Germans oppose. The Federalists state that, if necessary, they will blow up the Paris forts. On the 29th, the attack against Parta by the Versailles troops became general. A portion of the Versailles troops were repulsed, but others advanced from I Clamart and occupied the neighbourhood of Fort Issy. That fort was nearly destroyed, and the garrison have sinoe abandoned it. On the 2nd of May a battalion of Chasseurs carried at the point of the bayonet the railway station at Clamart and Chateau Issy, capturing three hundred Federalists. The Versailles troops unmasked a formidable battery at Montretout. A sharp engagement occurred round Fort Issy on the night of the 6th in the trenches uniting that Fort and Fort Vanveß. Several insurgents were made prisoners. The bombardment continues. A league has been established for supporting the liberties of Paris, and making a last effort to bring about a conciliation. Disorders occurred in London before the Parliament Houses, in consequence of Mr Lowe's Budget. Petitions from working men were presented against the Lucifer Match Tax, which Mr Lowe has since withdrawn. Strong opposition is shown to the proposed increase in the Income Tax, but the Government are firm, and have gained two or three divisions on the subject. For the Two Thousand Guinea Stakes Bothwell was first, and Sterling second. For the Chester Cup Glenlivat was firat. For the One Thousand Guineas Hannah wa3 first. The Habeas Corpus Act is about to be suspended in Westmeath. Thirty thousand operatives have been locked out at Oldham in consequence of a dispute regarding the hour of cloaing on Saturday.

The Times publishes a telegram from Copenhagen stating that difficulties have arisen between Denmark and Prussia, in consequenceof emigrants fromSchleswigto to Denmark being called to their military districts for the 15th May. News was received in London, on the 26th April, that the steamer Queen of the Thames had been wrecked off the Cape of Good Hope. On the 14th May, the steamer Briton arrived at Plymouth, with the firat-olasa passengers of the Queen of the Thames. The secondclass passengers follow per next Cape steamer. The Queen of the Thames was sold with her cargo for fifteen thousand pounds,

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18710617.2.33

Bibliographic details

THE SUEZ MAIL., Otago Witness, Volume 17, Issue 1020, 17 June 1871

Word Count
576

THE SUEZ MAIL. Otago Witness, Volume 17, Issue 1020, 17 June 1871

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