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News of the Week.

Judge Ward and Mrs Ward were passengers by the Taranaki, which sailed for the North last week.

A number of valuable dogs have been poisoned at Hawksbury during the last two or three weeks.

A movement is on foot in Invercargill to establish a public library and reading room in that town.

We understand that about 200 assisted immigrants will arrive here by the E. P. Bouverie, which was fixed to sail from the Clyde on the 4th May last.

It is officially notified* that Mr J. T. Thomson, Dunedin, has been appointed a Oommssioner under the Lost Land Orders Act, 1861.

Commercial affairs in Auckland are reported to be in a very depressed state. The warehousps are glutted with goods, and there is no prospect of increased sales.

A Royal Commission, consisting of five gentlemen, litis heen appointed by the Government of New Somb. Wales, "to visit and report upon the Gold fields of the colony."

The Tasmanian Times of a recent date states that "an enqineur has just contracted with the Otago Government; for the construction of a railway in that province, 51 miles in length, f0rL371,000."

It is said that the General Government intend to introduce a Bill during th* 5 session for the purpose of establishing Torrens's system of Registration of Titles, and that the Bill is safe to ua^s.

Letters of naturalisation have issued by His Excellency the Governor in favour of Mr Denir^ Costa, storekeeper, Kaitangata, and Mr Luriwig Adolph Heuirioh. Hotop, clerk, Queenstown.

The fifth and last session of the fourth Parliament of New Zealand was opened at Wellington on Tuesday. Tho Governor's speech on the occasion will be found in another column.

We understand that CaptainfJFraser has resigned the ofGce of Deputy- Superintendent, having b^-en called to the Legislative Council ; and that Mr W. A. Tolmie will be appointed Deputy-Superintendent in his stead.

Humours have been current in Invercargill during the last few days that payable gold had been found at Hokanui. and that the prospectors were negotiating for a lease of the ground.

A footbridge has been constructed across the Wafer of Leith, near Union street, from the materials of the bridges destroyed during the last flood. Nothing further has as yet been done to replace the other bridges. The werk of repairing Forth street bridge will, however, be commenced in a short time.

The proprietors of flax mills in Marlborough have formed themselves into an association for '• obtaining the knowledge, by discLssion or otherwise, of the best mode of dressing and preparing flax for the market ; also, the best mod« of shipping the same, and for the protection of the general interests of the association."

The total quantity of wool exported from Timaru this season is 11,549 bales. There are also about 14U bales awaiting shipment, miking the total clip 11,689 bales, or 1457 bales in excess of last season. The total quantity of tallow, including a few casks sDill to be shipped, exported, is 195 tons 13 cwt. 231bs.

A woman named Prielause, 30 years of age, was found dead in her own house in Auckland a few days ago. Three empty bottles, " smelling strongly of ardent spirits," were found at the head of the bed on which she was lying, so that it is presumed that she drank herself to death, her habits being very intemperate.

• The Nelson Mail states that in reply to an enquiry as to how his property at Westport was affected by the encroachment of the sea, a gentleman in Nelson has received the following highly satisfactory information :—: — " No. 33 is an amphibious section ; Nos. 902, 903, and 905— Breakers on the surface ; 919 and 920 — Navigable by ocean steamers."

Yesterday afternoon, while a man named George Andrews was driving a horse and spring cart past the old Police Barracks iv Princes street, he drove too near the footpath, one wheel being in, the channel. The dray went on one side, and he, being the worse of drink, lost his balance and fell off, one of his ribs being broken ia the falL He was conveyed to the hospital.

An accident took place the other day, by which one of the New Zealand Land Co.'s men named Gulliven, who was crossing the Pomahaka River with horse and dray, unfortunately lost his life. The river being very high at the time, man, horse, and dray were swept away. The horse and dray were found some way down the river, but GalliTen's body has not yet been found.

The inhabitants of Clutha have taken initiatory Bteps for the formation of a Meat Preserving and Boiling Down Company in the district. From the interest manifested in the matter by the settlers and others, as well as from the energy displayed by the promoters, there is every reason to anticipate that the proposition will be successfully and speedily accomplished.

The Wellington Independent learns "fromvarious sources of information that a movement is _ou foot among several German farmers in Adelaide to emigrate to this . colony." The same journal i» "assured that

if the slightest encouragement were given b\ the Government in the shape of small grants of land, or a deferred payment, th< exodus from, bomb. Australia would bo ver, large."

As the steamer Golden Age was leaving the jetty at two o'clock on Tuesday afternoon a man named Janws Malone, who wat slightly the worse of drink, fell into th< water -while going on board. Sergeant Quiri and Constable Coneys, with the aid of some bystanders, got him on board the steamer, where he changed his clothes, and continued his jeurney, apparently none the worse for the ducking.

A correspondent of the Auckland Herald comp ains that an injustice haa been done to Colonel M'Doxmell, by not conferring upon him the New Zealand Order of Valour. 'If allowing his men to be cut to pieces at Tt Ngutuoteraanu, and Te Kooti, with a vantly inferior force, to esoape unscathed after a fruitless campaign ef six or seven months, are to he considered " acis of gallantry," Colonel M'Donnell is richly entitled to the honour.

The adjourned meeting of the Education Board was held in the Superintendent's office on Tuesday. There were present His Honour the Superintendent. Messrs Reid, Duncan, and Gillies. The Board resumed consideration of the applications for the Commercial Mastership, but in consequence of the non-amval of expected information respecting one of the candidates, the election was postponed. JN"o other business of importance was transacted.

In connection with the Professorships in the Otago University, it may be mentioned that there are from home, 55 applications for the Professorship of Classics, and 49 for that of Mathematics. The naTies of these applicants h.ive been forwarded by Mr Auld, the home agent, who has promis- d to send the written applications, testimonials, &c, by the next mail. In addition to these, there are six candidates for each Chair from the Australian colonies and New Zea'and provinces.

We were the other day shown a large seal which had been caught off the Gas work?, tt is of the species known to fishermen as th* "SilverS2.il, 11 being in colour a dull yellowish white, with a few irregular dark patches on the body. The animal, which, is a female, and is 7t't. in length, is confined in a large zinc-lined case in the shop of Mr Jewitt, fiahmoDger, Princes street. It snapped furiously when the cover of the case was lifted, emitting at the same time a loud hoarse bark, not much unlike that of a large dog.

A Melbourne artist, Mr Thomas Wright, has just completed a work of which the Argus speaks in the following terms : —It is a view taken on the Waitahuna Hirer, Otngo, New Zealand, in which Mr Wrght not only introduces us to a region teeming with the picturesque, but shows it to u--under appearances of nature strikingly beautiful and imposing in themselves. The work, as a whole, is undoubtedly the best we have seen from Mr Wright's pencil, and one which has 30 many merits of the best kiad that we are certain it will greatly enhance his reputation even amongst those who have a'ready some acquaintance with his ability and taste.

The contractors for the Pitt street cutting are employed in laying down a corduroy road, so as to prevent their carts from sinking in the mud. No excavating or carting work is at present being carried on there. The sides, including part of the adjoining property, have slipped into the cutting, which is consequently very narrow at the bottom, and in some parts tilled with de ris. Large boulders from the sides also lie about in abundance. A large amount of additional work is consequently entailed upon the contractors. The whole street haa a most melancholy appearance, mud and boulders abound ing everywhere.

The following resolution, introduced by Mr White, haa been carried by the Westland County Council: — "That in proportion to its population and revenue, and to the extent of the representation enjoyed by other districts in the colony, as compared with their population and revenue, the Couaty of Westland is inadequately represented in the Colonial Legislature ; and that a committee be appointed, consisting of Messrs Harrison, Baiff, and the mover, to draw up a memorial for presentation to the General Assembly, praying that measures be taken during the approaohing session to place the representatation of this district on a just and equitable basis."

At a sitting of the Supreme Court at Wellington the other day, one of the jurors claimed exemption on the ground of being a member of a volunteer fire brigade, duly enrolled under the Volunteer Act. After a careful scrutiny of the Volunteer and Militia Acts, says the Independent, His Honour said that he could not find that volunteer firemen were exempt from service as jurors, although they were exempt from service in the militia. JAt the Bame time he recognised the value of the services of such a body of men, and as he was satisfied that the applicant had actually been engaged as a fireman within the laßt year, he would grant him exemption in the present instance, but his doing so must not be taken as a precedent. '

A correspondent writes :— " On Thursday evening about half -past 6 o'clock a strange phenomenon was seen near Popotunoa. It was unusually dark at the time, and a heavy drizzling rain waa falling. Suddenly there was light, but from what cause it would be difficult to say. Being on horseback and finding my fr»y with great difficulty along

ihat deplorably bad piece of road between Waiwera and Popotunoa, suddenly the road, :he fences, and Burrounding objects hecatm Ustinctly visible. It evidently was not lightning, for the light lasted at least eighi <econds. It might be some fie r y atmos jheric meteor or fire-ball. Whatever it wat it made those who witnessed it feel that it was something of very rare occurrence."

From a private source, the Wellington Adve tiser learns that, on 'he arrival of the Ltma at Opotiki, the Hon. the Defence Minister caused the whole of the natives jnd militia to be struck off pay. The redoubts are at present garrisoned by about 30 of the Armed Constabulary under Capt. Swindley. Native affairs at present remain in statu quo. We also learn that, on the return of the expedition under LieutenantColonel St. John, the Defence Minister placed him under arrest, for some alleged indiscretion in native matters. We have not he ird the cause of the gallant colonel's offence, but imagine it must have had its origin in that root of all evil, the " native difficulty."

A special meeting of the Auckland Chamber of .Commerce held on the 30th ult. The President, Mr Thomas Macffarlane, was in the chair. A resolution was pissed affirming the desirability of continuing the present postal ro ite from Sydney to Sau Fr mciaoo via Auckland. A second resoln ion was passed, in which the Chamber expressed its determination to send a deputation to Sydney to lay the whole question before the Government there, with a view of Auckland being retained the port of call. It waa agreed that a report of the whole proceedings in connection with the postal route should be drawn up, and forwarded to the Chambers of Commerce at San Francisco, Australia, and New Zealand.

The work of driving the piles for the exteasion of the Eattray street Jetty is being coined out by a gang of pnsomrs, under the inppc ction of tha overseer, Mr Carson. Nine rows of piles, at a distance of 10 feet, ap.irfc, have already been driven, so that the piles now extend to a distance of 90 feet from the preseut head of the jetty. The outside pie of every row is driven into the ground to the depth of 24 feet in order that the piles may not be disturbed by future dredging operations. The driving of the pile 3to that d^Dth will necessitate their being scarfed, piles of a sufficient length not being obtainable. The ' ottom is very hard, and the piles cannot be driven more than an inch or two to the blow, although the monkey weighs 1.5 cwt.

The L 650.000 lorn scheme of the Provincial Government is denounced by the Bruce Herald as a cunningly devised plan to lock up three millions of acres in the hanrfs of the squatters. Messrs Reid and Gillies are accused of treachery to their supporters throughout the country for sanctioning the proposal. The Herald says : — That scheme gives to the lenders security over the pastoral rents of 3,000.000 acres held under leases, amounting to L 32 ,000 per annum. Now, what is the meaning of this proposal ? What must be the result of giving this security ? The shutting up of these" three millions of acres from settlement, the rendering i: impossible to have Hundreds proclaimed over any portion of these three millions of acres, or a single acre of these lands sold to any immigrant till the loan be paid up.

We trust that the effort to establish Evening Classes ia connection with the Athenaeum may prove successful According to advertisement the classes were to be opened on. Thursday evening laat. and persons desirous of joining were requested to call on the Librarian and enrol their names. For the present each class will meet once a week in the lower room of the Athenaeum. We understand that the classes are intended chiefly for adults, and not by any means as a substitute for day schools. In the event of the movement proving successful, other classes will be established from time to time, as circumstances may require, so as to place the means of mental culture within the reach of all who are willing to take advantage of them. The classes will be under the manat<ement of a Commitfee&, to consist of the Class Committee of the Athenaeum, the teachers, and three members of the classes to he elected by the puprts.

A despatch from Earl Granville has recently been received by the Governors of these colonies with reference to the Eniigrati. n question. Its tenor may be gathered from the following passage : — "Tae points on which we should be specially desirous of receiving information are : — The classes of labourers wnose labour is most in demand in the co ony under your government ; the numbers for whom employment could be found ; the probable wages they would earn ; whether married men with families could obtain wages to enable them to support their families and bouse accommodation for their shelter ; what assistance or facilities would be provided to pass the emigrants to the districts where their labour is in demand}; and whether any pecuniary assistance would be granted, either towards the passages, or towards providing depots and assistance on their first arrival, or towards sending them up the country. 1 should be glad, also, to be furnished with any additional particulars and observations which your knowledge of local circumstances may suggest as likely to be useful."

Although some months have elapsed since it waa stated that a professional agent tor Mr Fairlie had arrived in Melbourne, very little has since transpired with regard to his negotiations. We take the following para-

graph on ■ the subject from the Melbourne correspondence of a Sydney journal : — 1 mentioned some waeks ago that a professional engineer had arrived in the colony as the agent for the English company, who are the promoters of the Jfairlie Bystera, of railway engineering. This gencleinan has lately submitted proposals to our Government on behalf of the Fairlie Engine and Steam Carriage Company, for furnishing the permanent way, engines, and rolling 3tock for our new North Eastern Railway. He alleges that a saving ef LIOO.OOO may be effected in the first cost of the railway, and that 20 per cent, may he saved in the working expenses if the Fairlie principle is adopted. Of course the Government have not pledged themse'ves to do more than consider these proposals. If they act on the advice of our Engineer-in-chief, they will probably reject them.

The branch road from the main line to the Jetty at Moeraki is getting out of repair to such an extent as to threaten before long to cue off communication altogether. In several places part 3of the road, varying, from 2l l ffc. to a chain in length, have subsided en masse, and at two points very heavy slips have occurred, extending nearly across the roadway. No doubt the department is entitled to the greatest consideration in the matter of this road, as it is wpll-known that it has been from the be. inning one of the most difficult thoroughfares in the province to keep in order, and the late heavy rains have very much added to the difficulty. But it is equally true that the amount placed upon the year's Estimates to maintain the road (L 150) is ridiculously disproportionate to the necessities of the case. It is not much more than sufficient to defray the surface labour. Leaving everything else out of the question, to put the rod in a rea'.ly permanent state of repair, a considerable outlay would, have to be incurred for culverts and retaining walla, which is not likely to be done at present. Something, however, must I c done before long.

In the course of a recent debate on a Liquor Bill, Air Michie said : — The present law was generally admitted to be a vast improvement on the old measure. There wa-s oue point which had. been ignored by the hon. member, and ie was hardly fair to do so. It was the result of the enquiry conducted on the goldtields by some of the public officers into the working of the present Act. With very few exceptions, the answer to all enquiries had been that the Single Bottle Bill had not had the effect of increasing drunkenness. Dry as statistics were to the general reader, they were the only authority "which could be invoked in this cisc by .-my one who had studie I the question, with, a view of arriving at the results of the present Bill ; and iv all cases it had neen found favourable. It had been said that the Bill was an infamous one, as it gave opportunities to working men's wives of getting drink at the grocers' shops, and then putting down the amount so expended as groceries. This wag oniy gossip, though of course there were certain exceptions to every rnle, and there were some persons who would seize any facilities for obtaining drink.

The inhabitants of the Kuri district are rejoicing in the belief that no one has responded to the invitation of the Government to tender for a lease of their bush. Many of them seem to entertain the idea that the handing over of this bush to one individual would approach very nearly to a breach of faith on the part of the Government. It appears that when the old surveyed lands in the district were offered for sale at. 10s an acre Bomu two years ago, the short distance from the bubh was specially mentioned as an inducement for purchasers to come forward. The whole of the surrounding unsold lands was then bought up, the purchasers of course understanding that the bush was one of the privileges pertaining to the sections bought. Now that the bush has not been leased, perhaps the Government would consider the advisability of retaining it in their own hands. Were a Ranger appointed, the whole of the inhabitants of the district, as well as some trom the Tai'-ri Plain, would take out licenses, the revenue from which would far exceed the amount of rent anyone would offer for it. Thus the course suggested would be the most profitable for the Government, and at the same time more satisfactory to the settlers.

The proposed union of Otago and Canterbury is editorially discussed in thejSouthern Cross of the 31st ult. That journal pronouuees the following opinion : — The union of Canterbury and Ot*go, as proposed, would not, in our opinion, tend to the progress of either community ; whilst the creation of so powerful a province in the Middle Island, especially when it is proposed to absorb Southland also, would encounter serious opposition in the General Assembly. It would, if successful, be a total reversal of the policy of the New Provinces Act, and the centralising measure- of the late Administration ; but quite apart from that, we perceive many cogent reasons why such a union should not be tolerated under the existing Constitution. It goes too far, and yet not far enough. Canterbury, Otago, and Southland, represented by delegates in the Geaeral Assenv ly, could dominate the colony, and render all legislation, subservient to their local interests. . The political balance would be destroyed, and the North Island would practically be disfranchised. Such, a state of things, we say once for all, could not be accepted by thia province ; but we are prepared to accept a constitutional amendment on the basis of in i I solar separation. , J

An address is about to be presented to the Postmaster- General by settlers and business men connected with Moeraki, asking for the establishment of a telegraph ofll je at Hampden. Ifc is stated that tbe residents within the districts traversed by the 36 mil°s of road between Palmerston and Oamaru feel the want of telegraphic connection, and that the facilities now at their disposal are inadequate. We understand that it ia the intention of a number of maßters and agents of vessels trading to, or occasionally availing themselves of, the port of Moeraki as a har. bour of refuge, to take action in the same direction. It is quite true that during inclement periods, such as the present, the safety afforded within the Moeraki roadstead is taken advanvage of by a considerable number of vessels, and as the distance from thence to the nearest telegraph station is 14 miles, masters of vessels are entirely" deprived of telegra 'hie facilities, the journey to the office involving an absence from the ship incompatible with its safety. The regularly trad.Dg steam vessel is informed by telegraph of the state of the weather at Oamaru before leaving Port Chalmers, but it constantly happenß that she is detained at Moera'u, waiting a change of weather to get to Oamaru. Upon such occasions infoimation as to the state of the roadstead at the latier place would be of value, but it cannot be had under existing conditions.

A striking example of the strides taken by telegraphy during the last few years is furnished in the following extract from a private letter from London :—'' We heird of the S3fe arrival of the Somersetshire (which took place at noon on the 30th March) on tbe 19th April. This is tolerably quick, but it is nothing to what we mny expect when telegraphic communication is open with AubtraLa. As a triumph of telegraphic commuaicitioTi, I may mention that Mr Lowe's budget speech was concluded at 11.30 at night. It was telegraphed to Calcutta, and was published in the papers of the following morning;, tbe telegraphic operators having about six hours' disadvantage in the difference in mean time. [Calcutta mean time is 5 hours 53 minutes earlier than that of London ] Thus the speech was really not concluded until about 5 30 a.m. Calcutta time ; but the telegraphing no doubt went on piece by piece as the speech was delivered, and would begin perhaps an hour, or even less, after Mr Lowe commenced speaking, and was probably finished in a little more than an hour after he finished, or perhaps before 7 in the morning at Calcutta. The publication in Calcutta was also five or six hours in advance of the Times, and the speech was read in Calcutta while we were sleeping. About the same time the Government received a telegram from Teberan in Persia, in answer to a previous message, in thirty seconds."

Tiie heavy rain which fell at the beginning of last week is reported to have done considerable damage to the tail-races and dams in the Mount Ida district. The Chronicle says : — On Sunday evening last, during the entire night, Naseby was visited by the most serious flood which has occurred since that of the 2nd of January last. The water came down the Main Gully in large volumes, and the ditch of the Extended Company, who had only a few days previously commenced washing up, has been completely filled up, and washing operations consequently suspended. The dntnage, we are glad to hear, is only of a temporary nature, and such as a fortnight's work will again set in order. The dumage done to a tunnel known by the name of Cooper's tunnel, which passes under the road at a depth of some thirty feet, on the road to Eden Creek, crossing Enterprise Gully, is considerable, in addition to which a portion of the road has been washed away ; but every exertion is being made by Cooper and party to place the road in a good state of repair with all possible speed. At St. Bathans, the flushing channel recame choked up, portions of its banks having fallen in, and some of the smaller paving-stones of the main channel also got displaced ; consequently the miners who work in what is known as "the basin" have been busy repairing those works. With this exception, however, the Hoods have caused no idle time, and no other damage worth speaking of to parties residing in St. Bathans.

With respect to the delay which has taken place in the publication of the official agricultural statistics of the colony, the Lyttelton Times says :—"lt: — "It is very much to be regretted that those more immediately interested in these statistics should have had to wait so long before they were available in a complete form. Th« 3 North Island provinces are almost entirely to blame lor this delay. In the case of Canterbury and Otago, where the returns are infinitely larger, and where they have to be collected over a much wider area, the statistics were before the public by the middle of March, or about twenty days after they were due from the various sub-col-leciora We see no reason why the same despatch should not have been observed in the otheV provinces. Every one knows that the value of such statistics is in a great degree to be measured by the rapidity with which they are placed before the public, and we trust the General Government, under whose direction they are collected, will insist on their publication all over the colony, say not later than the middle of March. There is really nothing to hinder this being done. " We have already expressed our opinion on this matter, and we will therefore only add our hope that next year the statistics will not only be published at an earlier date, but that they will be correct when published, It ia not too

much to expect from the Superintendent Collectors that they should add up their totals accurately. Otherwise the forrml attestation — "I hereby certiiy that the above ia a correct compilation from tho original Returns " — is a m^re farce. Perhap3 the ;*upermtendent Collectors of Auckland, Taranaki, and Westland will take the hint.

With reference to the discussion with closed doors on the question of the appoint menfc of an Immigration Agent for Great Britain, very little has leaked out. We are not aware whether the reason why hen. mem' ers are reticent on the subject is that they have a wholesome terror of the and the consequences of a breach of privilege before their eyes, or whether the proceedings were of such a character as to make them, in their calmer moments, somewhat ashamed of them. Nevertheless, a few interesting particulars have oozed out. We do not know whether it is true that one lion, member desired another to favour them with a hornpipe instead of a speech, but we believe that in the heat of the discussion the language became personal and acrimonious to a degree. Besides Mr J. L. Gillies, who was named by the Government, the names of nine other candidates were brought forward. They were a very "FalstafFs ragged regiment " of political hangers on. Lawyers without practice, and one of them occupying even a worse position than Lhafc. Jacks of all trades, and Jacks of no trade, from the gentleman who makes Ivs ivmg no one knows how, and vho does not mind "selling a friend a horse," to the man who ge*s along ev«ry body knows in wh it raannrr. Mr Gillies ought to be glad that he has got out of an appointment for which the qualifications, judging from the other candidates proposed, were expected to be of so low an oner. We do not know whether, had any of the nine beeu appointed, the Council expected that any result, except the gratifying one to the recipient of having got a "billet," would have followed ; but we certainly do not think that men of the stamp we have indicated are the proper sort of peisons to represont ua at home. During bhe debate Mr Ashcroft moved as an amendment that no Immigration Agent be appointed at present, the amendment being carried by the casting vote of the chairman.

The Otago Loan Scheme has naturally suggested to the Southern Cross the propriety of a similar " boon " for Auckland A leading article on the subject cone udes as follows : — Auokland is not likely to let the session pass without endeavouring to pass measures calculated to forward its interests. What those measures may be we are not in a position to say; but we shall be surprised if , in a general scramble to increase the colonial liability for local purposes, this province alone should exercise the virtue of selfdenial to an extreme degree. Auckland, of all the provinces of JSew Zealand, needs population moat ; and Auckland, of ail the large provinces, possesses the smallest provincial estate, and the largest area of land fit for settlement. It has no terri tonal revenue ; it has no hope of obtaining any. The legislation of the colony in respect to native lands, since 1562, has extinguished its land revenue. The " sacred compact of 1856 " was set aside by an Act of the Colonial Legislature in 1862, and the policy of that Act ha 3 been confirmed by subsequent legislation. So far, therefore, as the '• compact" in question is concerned, Auckland is exempt from all obligation to observe it. The financial arrangement in question has been still further ignored by the provisions of the Public Revenues Act, which diminished the proportion of general revenue falling to the province, under the Surplus Revenue Adjustment Acb. But Auckland does not stand alone on this platiorm. The other North Island provinces have all an almost equal right to complain. But if tho Provincial Government of Auckland promote any large scheme whereby population may be introduced, and employment found for the immigrants, the Assembly would be forced to reconsider the basis oj which the revenue is distributed, in view of the conflicting policies and claims of Otago and Canterbury on the one hand, and of Auckland on. the other. The importance of Auckland, and the large contributions it makes towards colonial services, as well as the necessity that exists for settling itß southern districts, i;i the interests of peace, must force the consideration of its claims upon the House.

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Bibliographic details

News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 968, 18 June 1870

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5,432

News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 968, 18 June 1870

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