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WELLINGTON.

(prom the daily times correspondent.)

THE CHAMPION RIFLE BELT AND THE SILVER MEDAL, BOTH WON BY OTAGO.

29th March, 1566.

Allow me to congratulate Otago on the result of to-day's firing for the colonial rifle prize?, the two competitors from your Province having carried off the first and second. As the best colonial sLot, Corporal Christie, of EastTacri, Anil wear the belt for the ensuing year, in addition to receiving the money prize of o^e hundred pounds, having been closely pressed, however, by Corporal Taylor, of Dunedin, who scored 37, or two ks3 than his more fortunate companion. The day Avas very fine but breezy. There was every appearance last evening of a slight southerly wind, which beii-g one that can be depended on for steadiness would ha\e helped tbe shooting ; but the wind set in from the N.W, and wa3 puffy, so that some of the competit >rs may be said to have shot at a disadvantage, although from the whole of them shootirjg single shots in rotation, the disadvantage of a puff and ) the advantage oi a calm were pretty fairly shai-ed iv by all alike. There were only eighteen present representing the Piovluces, thus : — Auckland, 4; Taranaki, 2 ; Napier, 1; Wellington, 4; Nelson, 2; Marlborough, 1; Canterbury. 2; Oiaqo, 2. The range, which had beeu selected on the Hutt Race Course, Avag an exceedingly good oce: it was new to all, as practising on it by those who have been waiting here for some few days had been strictly prohibited ; but every competitor was to-day allowed two trial shots at each of three distances Darned. 400, 500 and 600 yards. Some of the competitors proceeded to the Hutt yesterday, while others were driven there from town between seven aud eight in the morning, sufficiently early to give them a spell before, the hour fixed for commencing, namely half-pa-t nine. Christie and Taylor weat a-head at once, and maintained the lead ail through, tieing, passing, and re-passing each other at, almost every shot, to tbe intense excitement of those who laid bets. At the termination of the five shots at 400 yards, Taylor scored 18 and Chrisik 17; at 500 yards they tied each other with 29. Taylor then took the lead, and kept it for the three first shots at 600 yards, but missing the fourth he lost it to a centre by Chi if tie, who kept it to the end. The subsidiary prizes were also closely contested. At the end of the two lesser distftnees, Benton, Kennedy and Kitchen tied at 24, Clarke pressing with 21. At two shots at 600 yards Beuton was 4 a-'.ead; at three he tied with Kennedy, and at four also, but at the fifth his centre to Kennedy's outer, placed them thir and fourth respectively ; while Clarke had pulled up to Kitchen, both being 31. The tie was to be decided by one shot at tbe greatest range, but Kitchen missed, and so did Clarke. A second shot and Kitchen made a bull's eye. He had made one at the same distance previously, but as Clarke had made two, there Avas a fair chance for another tie. It must have been an anxious moment to him ; very likely it ayas too anxious a one, for he missed, aud the representative of Taranaki lost the day. The prizes Avere theu adjudged as follows: — Ist prize, LIOO aud Champion Belt, to Corporal Christie of Otago ; 2nd do, L 75, and Silver Medal, to Corporal Taylor of Ofaso ; 3rd do, LSO, to Private Benton of Wellington ; 4th do, L3O, to Captain Kennedy of Napier ; and sth do, L2O, to Pnvate Kitchen, of Marlborough. As v.ill be seen by the details below, the other competitors made verj' poor shooting ; Signal, who, at the practice at Wancanui, beat Owen, the retiring champion, only scored 17. Mr Stafford", Mr Pattrson, Colontl Russell, and Colonel Haultain, all rmdc their appearance on the ground, as did many others of the ofr.eials, it being a close holiday at the Government offices. The prizes Avill be distribute.! ou Monday, it is said, by Mrs Stafford, au-.l on the srme evuiing there is to be a public dinner, v,hich, from the high price of the tickets (two guineas']! \<-ill necessarily be but a thinly attended affair, the more especially as several ol the competitors Avill be leaving to-morrow, both Northern and Southern steameis having been detained for that purpose.

The Commission for allocating the amount of the Three Million Loan that has been spent for the permanent benefit of the Northern Island Provinces starts to-morrow for Auckland, from whence they will proceed to Taranaki, and thence, after returning to Wellington, to Napier. The Commission, a? you already know, is composed of Mr Thompson, late M.H.R. for Canterbury ; Dr Knight, the AuditorGeneral; Mr Woodward, the AssistantTreasurer ; and Major Heaphy, of Auckland. lam sorry to say that Mr Thompson is so seriously ill as to be unable to leave Canterbury. He came up here very unwell some few weeks a^o, and not finding the trip restore him| went back again. The Attorney- General has advised that another cannot meanwhile be appointed in his place, he not having resigned, but that the remainder of the Commission can act without him. It is understood that, on the completion of the Commissioners' investigation at Auckland, Major Heaphey is to resign, in order that a gentleman, belonging to Taranaki, may occupy his place during the investigations at the latter Province, who is in his turn to resign in favor of Napier, &c. — so that each of the Provinces more immediately interested will thus have the advautage of its local knowledge beiag represented. After all our doubts and fears, the Panama Service seems now to be really on the eve of its establishment. The present Sydney Government are determined to adhere to the agreement which their predecessors made with Dr Featherston a year ago, and the Ruahine was positively to sail in February for Sydney and New Zealand, to be followed by the Kaikoras in April, and the Rakaia is to go to Panama direct also in April, The proposition to call at Tahiti finds no favor with the directors, who, in addition to the delay, dislike risking their ships among the low and dangerous islands and reefs there would be in the route. The Panama Service is now looked upon most approvingly at home, and the W. I. Company intend making an alteration in their present route so as to save a day on the outward voyage to Colon, and a day and a-half on the return. Captain Vine Hall goes home, if possible, by the first Panama boat, and is to be succeeded by Capt. Benson, late of theArgo. There has been a change ii. toe local agent at Wellington, Mr Lawson having taken charge, vice Mr Ledger. Tnis is spoken of as preparatory to making Wellington the new quarters of the Pana'na Company in New Zealand, and it piobably is so. Perhaps it is not publicly known in Otago who is the writer of the pamphlet received last mail from London, entitled — " New Zealand's Credit find England's Honor," a pamphlet which home letters state has been largely circulated, and is doing much mischief. It may be worth while, therefore, to say that it is attributed to Mr Busby, of Auckland, whose political career has, for many year?, been so well known, that no one will express surprise at this or any other mischievous production proceeding from his pen.

The tauk for the reception of the Cook's Strait telegraph is being fitted up on board the ship Weymouth, and the hope is entertained that before the close of the ensuing session of Assembly, the Hue from Wellinston to the Bluff will have been opened. The Chatham Island )• xpedition has been so far successful. The St. Kilda has returned to Napier from her first trip with the prisoners, and is expected to make two more. The spot selected for the exiles is a peninsula, close to the haibor of Waitangi, and as they have been cor Ji illy welcomed by the resident natives they may, if they behave themselves, live very comfortably. The Government have promised to send a vessel quarterly to the Chathains to learn how matters are progressing.

From Hawke's Bay we karn that Mr M'Lean has completely beaten Mr Colenso, the votes being 146 to 32. Mr Ormond was re-elected for Clive without opposition. The rebels at Lake Waikare Moana have surrendered, and fro.n Opotiki- we learn that Colonel Lvon's men have surrounded a pa at Whakatane. The account says that "the surrounding country was comparatively clear and that the inmates had little chance of escaping. Major George's object in coming into camp, v.as to get the assistance of every man who could posgibly be spared." The Wanganui Times having intimated that Captain Percy, co long since wounded at Opotiki, and still very ill in Wellington Hospital, had been discharged and otherwise badly treated by the Government, that officer has written to the Independent to say that the statement is not only wholly untrue, but that . he has received every attention from it.

The premises of Messrs Bethune and Hunter, caught fire this morning, but were speedily extinguished. The steamer Taranaki, belonging to the N.Z.S.N. Company, arrived from Scotland on Sunday. She is a sister ship to the Wellington, and is said to be faster. She has gone to Nelson to be cleaned.

Wi Waka, the bounceable rebel chief in the Taueru or Upper Wairarapa district, Avho lately returned from assisting the West Coast natives during General Chute's late campaign, has renounced Hau-bauism, cut down his pole, and this week sent in his flag to Dr Feathereton, declaring all further resistance as hopeless and at an end. He is a thorough rascal, and his present attitude, though certainly indicative of the universal feeling of defeat which is everywhere felt, would be entirely changed if it should seem that there was any chance of resistance proving otherwise than the hopeless thins: it now does. Mete Kingi writes in from Wanganui that Pelu's up-river people, lately co boastful of their intentions, declare themselves dead so far as future rebellion is concerned. I confess that General Chute is to me a hero, and I may probably take too rose color a view of the results of his campaign, but I learn on all hands thit the great rebellion is over, although individuals and small parties have still a relish for doing as much mischief as they conveniently and securely can. Mr Whitaker has go' eto Tauranga, Avhither the Governor is to follow in the Eclipse; and it is understood that the land question will be settled speedily and amicably.

By the Lady Bird, from the North, Aye have Auckland news to the 23rd ultimo, Wellington papers to the 30th, and Canterbury to the 31st. We extract the following from the Wellington Independent: —

By the return of the St. Kilda, Captain Kennedy, we have intelligence of the arrival at the Chatham Islands of the first batch of Maori prisoners ; of the natives there having consented to receive them ;—; — and of their having been landed and located in a piece of land set apart for the purpose.

The St. Kilda arrived at Waitangi, Chatham Islands, on Wednesday, the 14th inst. The consent of the resident natives having been obtained, the prisoners were landed next (Thursday) morning, and Avere welcomed with great acclamation by their countrymen assembled on the beach. After being mustered the prisoners Avere marched to the pah, where they received numerous presents of foo 3, &c. In the evening they were marched up to the place where they are at present tocated — a beautiful spot at the foot of a rising ground, about half a mile S.W. of the principal pah. They arc siid to have beeu highly pleased with the plr.ee and the reception they met with.

We have been favored with the following information respecting these islands and their inhabitants by a gentleman who has just returned in the St. Kilda, which we have much pleasure in publishing :—: — After three days very pleasantly passed on board the good little 3teamer St Kilda, Capt. Kennedy, we sighted the S.W. point of Wharekauri or the Great Chatham Island, called Bishop's Point, from the resemblance of two peculiarly formed rocks to a Bishop's mitre. We then coasted northward till we arrived at the roadstead of Waitangi, where Aye dropped anchor. This bay is beautifully formed, having on one side richly colored red cliffs, and on the other a fine hard sandy beach, which extends for some miles. The anchorage is considered safe except in gale 9 from N.W., in which case vessels can easily run for the small port ofTongaroa, about 13 miles across the bay, Avhere there is always good anchorage and plenty of goo.l Avater. The settlement of Waitangi is the largest on the Island, the others being Oenga, Whangaroa, anl Pitt's Island. The principal native chufs— Toenga, Kopi, and Tungari — reside at Waitangi. I have seen no native pah in New Zealand Avhich can compare Avith this one for building, cleanliness, and good order. The houses, instead of being huddled together, as is generally the case, are built with some regard to neatness and regularity.. There is also a very handsome church, Avhich has lately been extensively je paired, and towards which Captain Thomas, X.M.— who I may here observe, appears to have won the respect of all about him — has contributed a neat little bell tower. Service is conducted with great regularity cA r ery morning and evening, of which the bell gives due notice. The kindly reception given us by these natives Avas very gratifying. The Maori population is about 380, in addition to a remnant of the original race of Morioris, amounting to 1 20. These latter resemble the Maori, but are, I should say, rather infeiicr both in appearance and intellect.

The Chatham Islands, judging by what I have been able to see of them, are most valuable. The country is generally low but beautifully undulating, consisting partly of rich red volcanic soil admirably adapted for wheat; and partly of an admixture of black peat and sand, which

the natives seem to prefer on account of the greater facility of working it. There is abundance of wood for fuel, but little or none for building purposes. The material chiefly used for buildinsj is fern tree, which grows in great abundance, an 1 the stems of which — when neatly put together, and, as in some instances, plastered with, lime— form a very substantial and lasting structure.

The streams, of which there are several, are well stocked with eels of a superior quality ; and one large lake or lagoon, a few miles from Waitangi, abounds in fish of various kinds. Cattle and horses are numerous, the former in some parts of the Island being quite in a wild state, and only to be got by the rifle.

The country is Avell adapted for sheep, although as yet there are not many, owing probably to the expanse and risk o£ shipping them. For fruit and vegetable growing the climate is all that can be desired, with the exception of the grape, for which there is not sufficient heat. There is not the smallest appearance of blight, either in fruit or vegetable, and lam told that gooseberries, curranta, &c. grow to a very large size. I should say fron: certain indications, that iron, and, not improbably, coal, may 3 r et b3 found, bat this remains to be proved. TIIE NAPIER ELECTION. The polling at Napier took place or? Tuesday, the 20th inst, and at its close the Returning Officer announced the result as follows: — M'Lean, 113. Colenso, 29. The state of the poll was declared on the

The Hawke's Bay Herald, of the 24th. instant, says : — By the arrival of a messenger from. Wairoa on Thursday last, information was received of the defeat of the Hau-haus at Waikare Moana, and of the surrender of the rebel chief Te Waru. Arrangements had been made to attack the body of insurgents who were knoAvn to be in arms a& Lake Waikare Moana ; and, if necessary, to raft the troops over to get at them. Kopu and his party of friendlies pushed oa to Onepoto, travelling day and night — Major Fraser and 50 men intending to follow. Kopu, on arriving at Onepoto, found a detached party of the Hau-haus encamped there, about 50 strong. They might easily have been surrounded, but one of Kopu's people prematurely fired off his piece, which gave the alarm. Three of the enemy, however, Avere killed — Ran> gipumakuao, Tirawhe, and Henare, one of them a mere lad. The first of the three was a great chief, and is said to have been shot by Kopu after the fight was over. One Avomaa Avas taken prisoner, and it AA r a3 determined to send her across the lake to Te Whfira, to afford him the opportunity of giving in. This Avas done, and Te Wharu, iv reply, seat over a messenger for a Queen's flag, and saying that all had agreed to come m and Avould cross the lake on the folloAving day; The news reached the camp on the evening of Monday last, and the rebel party was expected to arrive at Thompson's pa, Pakowhoi, on Tuesday or Wednesday.

This will be regarded as really good news," indicating as it does that we are rapidly approaching the end of the war against Hau-hau fanaticism on the East Coast. The reduction of the armed party at Waikare Moana was absolutely necessary, and arrangements had been made, we understand, for the advance of a considerable force, European and native, for that purpose. The nature of tbe country, however, would have rendered an attack from the water an undertaking of considerable risk — involviog probably great loss of life ; and it is so far satisfactory that Te Wheru and his people have given in their submission without waiting till they were made to do so. The surprise, by Kopu, of their outlying party had, no doubt, a good deal to do with their decision.

The friendly natives have given another proof of their fidelity, to say nothing of the perseverance and courage they displayed, in travelling day and night over the worst country in the island, determined to compel the enemy either to fight or to surrender.

The correspondent of the Wellington, Independent, writing from Waiiarapa, under date Sunday, 25th March, says : — " Yesterday af ernoon Wi Waka wrote a note to J. V. Smith, Esq., J.P., tendering his allegiance to Her Majesty; and late last night, at a meeting of the natives, Wi Waka tendered his ' taiaha' to Mr Wardell on the part of the Governor. He requested and obtained a free pass to Popawai, to see Maniehera. The result of last night's meeting was a general decision that Hau-hauism should be at once abjured."

ess;

Tunicliffe ... 10 Rutherford , 5 9 7 6 2 25 14 f ARLBOROUGH — . . . Kitchen 11 13 7 31 31 lakterbury — ... Cook 12 Bright 10 6 6 5 2 23 18 20 Itago— Christie 17 Taylor 18 12 11 10 8 39 37 38

Point and Iliis, Average 5 shots each at — of each 400 500 600 Total Prov. .TTCKLAXD — 1G Gibbon 8 0 0 8 Brighton ..10 9 II 30 Stewart 12 4 2 18 Tew 5 3 0 8 "aranaki — 26 Clarke 11 10 10 31 M' Guinness 11 2 9 22 fAPIER— 34 Kennedy ... 15 9 10 34 Wellington— 21 Bentou 13 11 li 35 Signal 3 9 5 17 Greer 8 11 4 23 Jlason 8 0 4 12

. msfc, at noon, and wa9 as iolli M'Lean. Napier 113 lleanee 18 Petane 8 Mohaka 7 lows : — Colenso. 29 2 1 0 146 32 Majority for M'Lean . .1 14

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18660407.2.17

Bibliographic details

WELLINGTON., Otago Witness, Issue 749, 7 April 1866

Word Count
3,322

WELLINGTON. Otago Witness, Issue 749, 7 April 1866

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