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News of the Week.

[PROM THE DAILY TtSIES.]

A slight shock of earthquake was felt in Wanganui on the morning of the 17th ult.

The weekly overland mail from Hokitika now closes at 8 p.m. every Monday, instead of 9 a.m., as formerly.

The Superintendent has appointed Mr John Bathgate to be Chairman of the Civil Service Commission,

Mr Balfour, C.E , is at present engaged in a general inspection of the rivers on the West Coast. He has already visited Hokitika and the new port of Okarita.

A special "New Zealand Gazette" was issued at Wellington, on Saturday, containing the Govtroor's proclamation dissolving the General Assembly. The new elections must therefore, very shortly take place.

Mr Warden Beetham, writing from Wakatipu, under date January 20th, remarks :— " I have nothing new in mining matters to report since my last, except that the effect of the late flood will no doubt be observable for some short time to come in the escort from the district. Machinery for the quartz claims at Skippers is constantly arriving. A portion of the machinery for the Criterion Company, Arrcw, has also arrived during the week."

The Superintendent has divided the Province into Eleven Licencing Districts for carrying out the provisions of the Licensing Ordinance, the names and boundaries of which nppenr in the " Provincial Government Gazette" of yesterday. The -districts are Clyde, Qneenstown, Oamaru, Waikouaiti, Dunedin, Port Chalmers, Taieri, Tokomairiro, Clutha. Hamilton, and Lawrence. The Resident Msgistrates' Courts at Dun°din, Clyde, Lawrence, Oamaru, and Queenstown, are appointed places for holding Quarterly Licensing Meetings in their respective districts.

Mr R. H. Forrnan, late Sheriff of Otago, was arrested on Tuesday on board the Susannah Booth, when she was leaving the port for Sydney, and he waa at once brought up to town by detective-officer Wfale. The charge against Mr Fortnan ia, that he failed to account for different sums of money received by him as Queen's bailiff. He was brought up at the Resident Magistrate's Court, on Wednesday, and was remanded until Tuesday next, the question of bail being ieserved for consideration.

Another case of sticking-up is reported by the Hokitika correspondent of the 'Lyttelton Times ' :—": — " It occurred in the Nelson Province, between the Twelve-Mile and No Town, and almost on the same spot on which the robbery of the bank gold was perpetrated. In the present instance the victims were three packers, and fortunately the plunder amounted to only thirty shillings. The robbers were two in number, and well armed. They have not yet been apprehenled. and it is doubtful whether they can be identified."

Mr Warden Simpson, writing from Mount Benger, under date 13th January, says:— " The all engrossing subject of the week has been the monster flood of Wednesday, and its effects. In this district a g(.od d( al of damage has been done by the flood in the smothering up of claiais, carrying away wheels and other mining appl'ances; but on the whole, the district has not suffered the tenth part some others have. Certainly, had the miners not turned out most generously, and worked iate and early tightening the ferry wire rope, most probably we would have had to deplore the loss of the punt and gearing. Since the flood a number of the river miners have started out in the direction of the recent Beaumont rush, to prospect. That rush, I learn from some parties who have returned from it, has not come up to expectation."

The annual meeting of the members of St. Paul's Church was held in the School- house on Thursday. The Rev. Mr Edwards presided. The Treasurer (Mr Pantlin) read the ba'ance-sheet for the past year, which showed that, on the 319t December last, there was a dt bit balance with the Union Bank of L4i7 5s 6il,in addition to which L6OO was still due for the building of the steeple of the Church, making a total balance against the Church of L 1057 5s 6d. The Treasurer addel that, hut for the heavy expenditure during the past year in connection with the organ, the Church would have been cl-ar of debt, with the exception of the balance retnainira: due fcr the building of the steeple. The Rtv. Mr Edwards said that two things tended to make the accounts unsatisfactory — first, tho organ, whioh had been ordered unanimously by the parish, but had been a heavy drag upon the Church ; and, second, having to pay th* stipends of two clergymen. It was thought absolutely necessary to have a second clergyman, who would take charge of the districts of North Dunedin and suburbs, Caversham, and Port Chalmers, and it was calculated that his stipend and passage-money would be paid by those places. But these districts had contributed very little for the purposes mentioned, and consequently St. Paul's Vestry had to pay the stipend of the scond minister. But the principal drag upon them was the organ. Mr R. B. Martin wished to explain that the Vestry looked forward to the proceeds of a Bazaar to pay off the debt remaining on the building, and the overdraft at the Bunk. Then their offertories would be 1 sufficient to meet all the expenses of the year. Their revenue was very large, being last year nearly LllOO. If the Bazaar was a success their position at the end of this year would be a very satisfactory one. The Rev Mr Edwards said they had intended to hold the Bazaar in December last, but had postponed it in consequence of an application from the Benevolent Institution, with whose Bazaar it would have interfered. It was postponed until the present week, but in consequence of the Benevolent Institution having announced a second Bazaar, it was again put off. They could not hold it in Lent, and it had been postponed to Easter week in April. The Treasurer's report was adopted. On the nomination of the Rev Mr Edwards, Mr It. 13. Martin was appointed clergyman's Churchwarden for the year. On the motion of Mr Hope, Mr W. Mason was elected as the congregation's churchwarden. The following Vestrymen were elected : — Messrs Pantlin, C. CaldweU, G. 6. Russell, Butterworth, and G R. West. The Rev. Mr Edwards thanked the Superintendent and teachers of the Sunday School for their services during the p»st year, and congratulated thim upon its flourishing condition. He pointed out to the new Vestry the necessity for an addition being made to the school-building, as it was not adequate for the requirements of the school. There was an average attendance of nearly 130 scholars. He also mentioned, that under the instructions of the Vestry, an organist for St. Paul's Church had been engaged in England, and would shortly arrive. A vote of thanks was given to Mr G. R. We3t, and the ladies and gentlemen forming the choir, for their services. Mr West returned thanks on behalf of the choir. A vote of thanks was also recorded to the members of the Vestry for having, during the past year, carried the Church through financial difficulties of no ordinary character. The meeting then adjourned.

We understand that on Saturday last, a letter was addressed to Mr John Hardy, ia which he was requested by the Executive to send in his resignation of the office of Commissioner of Roads, &c ; bat that no reply hag yet been received from Mr Hardy.

Tha town of Naseby, on the Mount Ha Gold Field, and Waipori and Wetherstone, on the Tuapeka Gold Field, have been, by proclamation, reserved for purposes of sale, and withdrawn from the Gold Fields oa which they are situated.

A reply has been received fmm Mr James Peterson to the requisition from several citizens of Dunedin that he will become a candidate for the representation of the City in the General Assembly. Mr Paterson has given his consent to be put in nomination.

Mr Warden Stratford, writing frwn Upper Manuherikia, undtr date 12th January, says — " Five Chinamen, who have recently arrived in this district, are now sluicing at Peg Leg Gully, near this place. They appear to be well pleased with their prospects. There has been almost a general cssation on the mining works until now since Christmas."

A meeting was held at the Shamrock Hotel, on Thursday last, for the purpose of raising a fund for the purchase of an organ for St. Joseph's Catholic Church. Upwards of LBO was guaranteed amongst those present ; ani it was resolved to prepare lists (which will be in the hands of members ef the Committee) for the purpose of callecting subscriptions.

The Ladies' Committee of the High School for Girls have made a slight alteration in one of the resolutions adopted by them and published in our columns. The resolution, as altered, reads thus: — "That the school open daily with prayer, and a portion of the Bible be read ; and that, while the tenets of no particular sect be favored, it would be considered as strictly within the duty of every teacher in the school to exert their best endeavors to impress upon the minds of their pupils the principles of piety, justice, and a sacred regard for truth."

A lad named Herbert Michell wa3 very severely injared while on the new jetty between twelve and on© o'clock on Thursday. Amongst the vessels lying there, is the Lloyd's Herald, 6ome of whose crew were engaged in sending down her topmast. It is said that they neglected to put on a stop, and so were gui'ty of very unseamanhke neglect; but the result of what they did was that as soon as the topmast was clear of the cap, it turned over, darted down, and struck Michell, who was passing, in company with his brother. The lad was picked up senseless and bleeding, and while a surgeon was being looked for, there were plenty of willing assistants in the work of bathing his head. Dr Cunie and Messrs Reimerand Crawford soon arrived, and they agreed that the lad should be at once conveyed to the Hospital. There, it was found that the right arm was badly fractured between the shoulder and the elbow, and that there were two depressions of the skull, his condition being a very dangerous one. From inquiries made at the Hospital at a late hour last evening, however, we learn that the condition of the lad had slightly improved, and thit some hope of his recovery was entertained.

A return is appended to the report of the Secretary of the Gold Fields, of the Gold Fields population, and their various pursuits, on the 30th September, 1865. The total population of the Otago Gold Fields was 10,845, of whom 1053 were women and children. The number engaged in business pursuits was 2,879; of these 872 were storekeepers, 505 hotellceepers, 61 were engaged in packing, 317 were employed in cultivating the ground, and 1124 in other employments. The return gives the number of persons actually engaged in mining as 6913 ; but the Secretary considers the estimate too hi«h, and sets the number down at 6000. Taking the first number as the basis, there were 651 engaged in cradling, 3874 in sluicing, 1566 in ground sluicing, 224 usin? hydraulic hose, 112 engaged in puddling, 54 in dredging, 217 in tunnelling, 92 in quartz mining, and 123 in other descriptions of mining. The rate of wages varied, according to the nature of the employment, from L 3 to L 6 per week.

The " Waikouaiti Herald" publisher a letter received by Mr J. Vogel, M.P.C., from Mr G. Elliot Elliot, secretary to the PostOffice Department. Writing on the 24th ult Mr Elliot says , " I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 18th November last, forwar 'ing a petition from inhabitants of the township of Hawksbury and surrounding district, praying that a daily, instead of a tri- weekly, mail service be estiblished between Waikouaiti and Dunedin, and to inform you that it was intended that a' daily service should be established to Oamaru (which has double the amount of correspondence of that to Waikouaiti) and which would embrace Waikouaiti. Tenders for such a service were accordingly called for, and the lowest received amounted to L 2200 per annum, but which was declined on account of its being considered too expensive. The Postmaster-General regrets that he is thus unable to comply with the prayer of the petitioners. 1 have to apologise that through inadvertence your letter has remained so long unanswered." The "Herald" says, "It will be observed that by our being associated with the requirements of Oamaru, we lose what would have been most beneficial -to us at trifling co9t, because no extra service would really be required in our case, we having coaches running daily from Dunedin. We would suggest that Messrs Hoyt and Co. submit a tender to the Postmaster-General for the conveyance of the extra three mails, and have no doubt that when the moderate figure at which these can bo carried ia noticed, our prayer will speedily be granted."

Messrs H. J. Miller, W. H. Reynolds, and 3L; B. Martin have been- appointed by the Superintendent a Commission to enquire into the position 61 the property invested under the old Otego scheme for Eeligious and Educational purposes. Mr H. J. Miller is the Chairman

Mr John Bathgate retires from his candidature for Port Chalmers, the electors of •which, it will be remembered, had assured him of his unopposed return. Mr Batbgate, in his address at the public meeting, explicitly stated that his candidature depended on the decision of the Directors of the Bank of Otago ; and his retirement is the consequence of ' information by the last mail, that the Court of Directors, after maturely considering the question of bis entering the Assembly, had come to the conclusion that it was not advisable he should do so. Mr Bathgate fully explains his position in an address published in another column.- No doubt the electors of Port Chalmers ' will be much disappointed. The electors of the Taieri district are to meet on Wednesday eveniug, " to consider what steps are necessary to have the district properly represented." Mr A. J. Burn*, who, ■with MrMacandrew, sat last session for the Bruce district, is the only one yet named as a tjandidate. — For tl\e Manuherikia district, our Dunstan correspondent informs us that Captain Baldwin, is being brought forward, as 'well as Mr J. B, Bradshaw. We understand that endeavors are being made to avoid a contest for the representation of the Waikouaiti district, mainly with a view to ensure that both Mr Dick and Mr V.'gel shall have seats in the new Assembly. We believe that Mr Dick would have gladly stood for the Caversham district, and would have been certain of election, had he not consented to be brought forward for Waikonaiti. In consequence' of this, some of the most *ctive politicians in Caversham district liave suggested that the two bodies of xequisitionißts at Waikouaiti should enendeavor to come to an agreement as to which candidate really has the less chance of election ; and *hat, if that can be done, the gentleman indicated would be at once invited to stand for Caversham. At present, a reply from Waikouaiti ia being waited for.

A sale of racing stock took place on Saturday, at Christchurch, of which Mr G. D. liockhart gives the following report in the *' Lyttelton Times," of the 22nd inst. :— " I had a large attendance at Edds's Repository, in Hereford street, where I offered W. "H. Harris, Esq.'s racing stud, and C. S. Saxton, Esq.'s young thoroughbreds, principally got by Golden Grape. Golden Grape was imported from England by W. Robinson, Esq., of the Cheviot Hills Station. I offered upwards of 60 horses, the first on my list being Stormbird, the winner of the Christchurch Plate and the Queen's Plare, and second horse for the Canterbury Cup ; he was sold to Michael Studholme,Esq ,forL7oo. This torse I honestly consider worth 1000 guineas ; lie looked in splendid condition, and, after his performances during the race week, he may be considered the best horse in New Zealand. Belle of the Isle — most appropriately named — the winner of the Canterbury Cup, ■worth about LISOO, w.is bought in by direc tion of the owner at LSOO. Idle Boy I was offered L 95 for, which was refused. Zig zag found no put chaser. It is a matter of congratulation to Canterbury that neither of these valuable horses are leaving the province. Mr Saxton's young thorough-hred stock were much adromd, and looked after, but coulJ not be quitted at the pricrs ofFeied. The unbroken draught colts changed hands from L3O to L4O per bead; and a lew of Dr Earle's draught colts changed hands at about L 35 JFor good hacks there appeared little demand, and only one or two were sold. There appeared to be a scarcity of money for investment."

In noticing the death of the Rev. Dr. Lillie, the " Canterbury Press " says : — ''Before settling in Canterbury, Dr Lillie had been for upwards of twenty years minister of the Presbyterian Church, in Hobart Town ; and ■was, during that period, the most influential representative of the Church of Scotland in the Southern Colonies. He took an espt cial interest in the subject of education, and was, in conjunction with Archdeacon Davies, and a leading Ecclesiastic of the Church of Pome, the author of the educational scheme which "was established by the Government of Tasmania. He was large-minded and tolerant ia his views of what was required by the peculiarities, ot Colonial society — and while a xnost conscientious and staunch adherent of the Church of Scotland, and of the Presbyterian form of government, he was both liberal and conciliatory in his intercourse with anembt- 1-8 of other churches, and in his respect lor their opinions. As a member ot the Board of Education in this Province, he did much to promote those temperate and un.seerarian views which are now adopted by all our political parties. In early life, his learning and suavity of disposition and manner, recommended him to the post of tutor of the present Duke of Argyle, then Marquis of Lorn; and to the last, he watched with interest the political and literary career of his distinguished pupil. Amid all the engagements of an active and anxious professional career, lie continued to keep up his acquaintance with the ancient classics, and with the scientific and ecclesiastical discussions of the day. He died at the comparatively early age of 59 years."

We extract the following from Mr Warden Hobinson's report from Dunstan, of January 27th:— "The rivers are now subsiding a little, and in some places work is resumed, l>ut a considerable interruption oi mining operations, must be expected for a week or two yet. The escort this week showed a decided improvement upon the last, and it is to "be hoped that it will continue to increase."

On the 6th instast Mr -Warden Wdod reported from Nokomai:—-" Very little uoing this week in mining, aB the Christmas Holidays were kept up till the middle of tjhe week many of the water laces getting dry. Prices of lnbor, &c. : Creek workings, 80s to 90s ; other mining, 60s to 80s ; laborers, 40s to 603 per week. P. ovisions, &c. : Bread, 41b loaf, 2s ; meat, 8d to lOd ; sugar, 8d ; tea, 3s ; flour, 8d ; candles, 2s ; tobacco, 8a ; potatoes, ljd per lb ; milk. Is per quart; butter (fresh), 3s 6d per lb ; eggs, 4s per dozen."

The Wellington " Advertiser " records an extraordinary fatal accident, which occurred at Karori, to a boy of the name of John Henry Baker, nine years old. While wheeling a barrow about he got two turns of a rope, which was attached to the handles, round his neck, and in running along the barrow in some manner got overturned, bringing him down with it. The extra turn at once tightened the cord round his. neck, and when found immediately afterwards by a man of the name of Carter, he was quite dead, having been strangled by the rope.

In a notice of the Bisnopric of Otago, the "Lytielton Times" sayss — "The arrange^ ments for the formation of this episcopate, which is to include the provinces of Otago and Southland, are being proceeded with. The Bishop, the Rev. Lasiielles Jenner, D.D.j will, we believe, be consecrated at the same time as the new Bishop of Nelson, the Rev. A B. Suter, D.D., by the Primate of England. A grant of LIOOO towards the endowment ot the Bee, has, we understand, been made by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, and the Primate of New Zealand is endeavoring to supplement the amount to LSOOO, by means of contributions to be raised in England. Hitherto the affairs of the Church of England in these p ovincea have been managed by a Rural Deanery Board, under the supervision of the Bishop of Christchurch, who, by the new . arrangement, will be relieved of this portion of his episcopal charge."

The overcrowded and filthy condition of the gaol at Hokitika has been frequently noticed by the local press, and was last week made the subject of severe remark by Judge Gresson, in his charge to the Grand Jury. From a report submitted to his Honor by Dr Bernat, it appears that the gaol consists of six cells, two of which are 12 by 10 feet, and four, 10 by 8 feet. They contained in all fitty-nine prisoners, there being as many as thirteen prisoners in each of the large cells. The only ventilation was by keeping the doors of the cells ajar, being fastened by a chain and padlock outside, thereby producing draft, and affording opportunity for strangers to hold communication with the prisoners. There was no ventilation (properly so called), and their construction was of such a character as to render them totally unfit to be inhabited by more than one-half of the present number of their inmates. No separateaccommodation was provided for debtors, who were therefore compelled to associate, not only with prisoners awaiting their trials, but even with those convicted. Through the want of a secure yard or enclosed space for exercise, and from the scarcity of warders, many of the prisoners were debarred from takiDg more than half an hou 's exercise per day. There was no messroom, and all the prisoners were obliged to take their meals in their cells. The prisoners have suffered greatly from diseases caused by the above evils, and it has been a matter of impossibility for the constables, with every exertion, to prevent the cells from being infested with vermin. Dr Bernat concludes by saying: — "I must express my firm conviction that unless steps are at once" taken, to give effect to anj r suggestions, not only will the prisoners be attacked with malignant fever, but that there is almost a certainty that the infection will be spread over the whole community."

We extract the following from Mr Warden Stratford's report from Upper Manuheiikia, under date January 6th :—": — " The diggings immediately in the vicinity of Thomsons are at.racting considerable attention just now. At St. Bathans the returns at washing up remain steadily the same. The population at German Hill slightly on the increase, owing to fresh supplies of water. At Blacks, No. 1 and 2 claims are weekly increasing in value. This district throughout is very auriferous, but the universal complaint is want of capital to bring in water to the ground, and want of fall for tailings."

The Pamara correspondent of the " Waikouaiti Herald" says: — "We have lately been experiencing some very fine weather. Nothing of any moment has transpired for some time past here. The Waitaki has been exceedingly high ; at one place, by Messrs Julius's station, it is swollen to such an extent ihat a piece of flat country, known as the " Barren Flat," is rendered impassable. A few days ago an accident occurred which might have ended seriously. Messrs R. Julius and Munro attempted to cross iv a buggy one of the creeks, but the current was so strong that the vehicle was upset; Mr Munro swam to the opposite bank and pulled himself out by some flax, so saving his life: Mr Julius kept hold of the reins and was drawn out by the horses. The fore part of the buggy only was brought to shore."

Mr Warden Stratford, in his report of the 20th Januaiy, from Upper Manuherika, says : — " Mining intelligence the same as last week. The various sluicing companies are steadily at work. No new ground opened, There have been a few new arrivals at St Bathans from other districts, but no. exodus. We have had very severe weather; and on Wednesday, the ground in the vicinity of Dunstan Creek was covered with chow. The rivers and creeks remain very high, and in consequence traffic is almost entirely stopped, as the best fords are almost impassable."

• The " Dunstan Times," in an article complaining ef the waut of gooii roads from Dunedin to and through the Gold Fields districts, says: — " Could timber be procured at even reasonable ratesj many quartz reefs would haye been long since opened, and other works undertaken that would have astonished the world. In the Mount Ida Valley, there is a well- defined deep lead of gold traced for nearly two miles in length, which, were it in Victoria, wonld support a population of at least 3000 people, but here it does not afford a living for as many hundreds, only for the reason that material is so costly that unless each claim is a "jeweller's shop" its owners cannot earnjsalt. Props at 81 per font, and caps and slabs in proportion, is an effectual bar to any mining progress. No one will speculate unless the venture is almost a dead certainty. Now, if the, Government really do desire to promote the development of the gold fields, theymustgiveusgoodmacadamised or other passable roads throughout the various mining centres, as also branch roads to the several sources of timber supply, for without that indispensable commodity ia more readily obtainable we cannot hope for progress. Duarnesa of material, ia the real cause of the present unsatisfactory state of mining affairs, and which are languishing in consequence. Labor is dear, not because of its scarcity, but that most employments are of so desultory a nature that a man is better off working on hi 3 own account iot half wages than by hiring himself to another,' '

We understand that Mr James Brownhill, ■who has for over two years past been Manager of the Branch Batk of Otago at Port Chalmers, has' resigned, and that Mr Ernest Littlejohn is appointed his successor in office. Mr Brownhill proceeds shortly to a similar appointment in Australia.

Mr Warden Robingon, •writing from Cromwell on the 27th January, remarks :—": — " The dullness in mining matters throughout the Dunstan district ia perhaps more severely fait in this portion than in any other. At Quartz Reef Point work is almost at a standstill. Nothing can be dene to the dams of the Nil Desperandutn Company until the river subsides below its present level."

At the Mayor's Court, on Wednesday, John O'Ntill, charged wth obscene and insulting language, in Jetty street, was fined 5s and costs. Eliza Wood, charged ■with a similar offence, was fined 403 and costs. It may ba necessary to repeat that his "Worship now hoMs his Court at the new Corporation Offices in Maclaggan street, and the Court is opened daily at 10 a.m.

The letter fiom our Dunstan correspondent, published on Monday, alluded to the necessity of repairing the shelter sheds on the ranges in the neighborhood of Campbell's Gully ; the following extract from the " Dunstm Times" is confirmatory of that account:—" A gentleman, recently returned from a visit to Campbell's diggings, supplies us with the following information.- — The lower shelter shed needs repairs to the extent of about LlO to make it serviceable. The upper shed, which is at the summit cf the hill, is very much dilapidated, s'nd will require an outlay of some LSO to render it available as a place of refuge. Our informant recommends that a small shed be placed at the head of the Pomahaka, which would afford shelter to travellers from the direction of the Teviot. The wires which were suspended from the snow poles are broken and Iving on the ground; and he is of opinion that if these, together with the unused coils, were collected and sold, the proceeds would go far towards the expense of repairing the sheds. At Potter's Gully there were several parties at work, with good succes-'. At the upper end of Campbell's Gully there are four parties at work, each party consisting of from six to eight; men. They are at present engaged in the work of cutting tailracrs. At Adel-ude Point, Warranty's, Robinson's, and M'Lachlan's parties were doing first rate. These parties are old residents at the place, and possess valuable claims. The number of the population i 3 about one hundred. There. are two stores and one restaurant. Tha district has lately been visited by Bevere storms of suow and rain, occasioning heavy floods. With settled weather, our informant is satisfied the yield of gold will be very large."

At the Magistrate's Coart, Port Clnlmers, on Wednesday, evidence was taken in a case occurring under the Registration Act, in reference to which the Magistrate (T. A Mansford, Esq ) reserved his decision until Wednesday next. The charge was one brought against Alexander Murison, sexton at Port Chalmers, and was to the effect that he had buried the remains of a child named Catherine Matilda Farrell, without receiving the necesfary certificate of death, contrary to the statute. The evidence taken was that of William Farrell, who proved the burial of the child without registration, and of John Joyce, tha Registrar, who produced the register ot deaths, and who proved that no register of the death, or certificate of the same, had been made or issued by him. The child, it appears, had died very suddenly in August last. Dr. O'Donoghue, one of the local medical practitioners, who was called shortly after the death, declined to give a certificate as to its cause. No inquest or post mortem examination was held, and the child was'buried without the necessary certificate ; but under a warrant issuel by the Coroner. According to the Registration Act, sucli certificate must be obtained by thd person officiating at the burial, and, unless an inquest has been held upon the body, no Coroner or Justice of, the Peace has the power, in the absence of such certificate, to order burial. The sexton, as the person officiating, was accordingly charged as the person responsible for the breach of the Act. The Magistrate, as ,we have stated, has reserved his decision of the case until Wednesday next.

We extracr the following from the "Oamaru Times "of Thursday week :—": — " Another extensive land- slip occurred at the works on the Jetty Road, on Tuesday afternoon, which very narrowly missed being attended by the most serious results. The slip occurred about five o'clock, when the workmen were about to cease working for the day, and there wera tea or twelve men near the spot where the land gave way. As some slight indication was given of the dislorlgment of the immense mass, they had sufficient time to get out of immediate danger, but in their hot hasta several rushed over the f ice of the precipitous embankment facing the sea, and right id s line with the earth's route, had it descended co far. As the earth was soft, luckily the men were enabled to stop short in their headlong course, else several would undoubtedly have received some serious injuries had they failed on to the beach. It is estimated that about three thousand tons of earth slipped away on this occasion, and the cause, as formerly,' wa* undoubtedly the giving way of the bed of fin«" sand which lies between the rock and theearth above. The contractor anticipates ft succession of these slips, as evidently nothing can be done to retain the sand in its position till the cutting is sufficiently sloped for. that purpose. We understand he has at this part removed about four times the quantity of earth required by the specifications."

Referring to the coming races the " Oamara Times" cays: — "Persons interested in *b* Oatnaru races will observe an alteration in tha programme, as published in last week's issue, to the extent that the value of the Qamarn Cup has been raised from 30 to 100 sovereigns. We may state that the . Committee have recently purchased a magnificent racing cup, weighing considerably upwards of on« hundred ounces, and which we believe is tn« best and most handsome cup ever offered in the Province. The entrance to- thef Cup race has accordingly been altered from L 3 to L 5. We anticipate a large fiald of good horses to contend for this prize."

From Hamilton, Taieri, under data 13th January, Mr Warden Charles Broad reports: — '' The past week has been distinguished by the most extraordinary variation of climate, commencing the first taree day? with the most intense summer heat, and terminating with a fall of snow from six inches to a foot in depth. The Rise and Shine Company at Hamilton are again washing up, and have already over 100 ounces. The heavy rain ot Friday has again supplied the various fields throughout the district with water, and the heavy fall of snow of Saturday is now rapidly disappearing. From Macrae's Flat to the Taieri River at Dr Buchanan's station, there id now a continuous chain of workings, embracing a length of 40 miles. Upon the opposite side of the Maniototo Plain, from the Kyeburn past Mount Ida towards Eden Creek, we have a length of about 20 miles. Detached parties are working along the Rough RLige to the head of the Serpentine, a distance of some 35 or 40 miles. A few parties are still working at the Deep Stream, junction of the Sutton with the Taieri, at the Shag River and Silver Screim, while at Hindon we have one quartz reef in full operation, and others about to be worked. The population engaged in mining pursuits in this large area numbers at prebent about ISOO, but it cannot be doubted that there is plenty of auriferous ground yet untouched, and that thero is plenty of room for m.my more miner. lam glad to observe at Mount Ida and Micraes many old fices who have returned from Hokitika to the fields they had left." The same gentleman, on the 20th instant, wrote :—": — " The population is gradually increasing. The new rush at Macrae's Fiat is turning out very well, and already SOlll3 stoivs are erecting. Sis men are working at Shag Rher, on the beach near the Carriers' Arms, and. have been doing- very well — they arc working on private property. The United Company at Hamilton is now formed into a Joint Stock Company, and came into the market under most f<ivorab'e circumstances, having the first water light, their race already formed, and good ground."

ThecotTPspontlentof fche"Lyttelton Times" says: — " With regard to the case of wilful murder, the inquiry was resumed by the, Coroner on the 10th inst., and evidence of a very important chwacter brought forward. A witness named Catherine Jones deposed to having seen deceased walking a'ong the beach on the morning of the 2nd January. She appeared to be crying very much, and after a while sat down on a log close to the edge of the water. Witness then saw the husband of deceased follow her: saw him pick up a stick about a yard long,' and as thick as a man's arm; and finally saw him strike his wife a left-handed blow with the stick, which knocked her off the log towards the sea. The husband jumped over the log, and witness saw no more of them. The body of deceased was found the same day rather further to the north, apparently washed up by the waves. The prisoner, when brought to the police station, denied having been on the beach at any time during the day; but this was clearly shown to be false by the testimony of several persons. There is a strong feeling amongst the inhabitants against the prisoner."

Mr J. I. Anderson, officer in charge at the Nevis, writing thence on the 20th inst. reports : " I am glad to be able to report that the dam upon the Nevis Flat, which was recently destroyed, is now again re-built;, , The damage caused to the claims by the, late flood is now found not to be quite so serious as it was at first feared, and it is expected that the majority of the claims will again be in working order by the end of next week. In consequence ot the late floodj mining operations have been much impeded in this neighborhood ; and there is, therefore, little at present lo report connected with the various claims around."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18660203.2.27

Bibliographic details

News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 740, 3 February 1866

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6,179

News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 740, 3 February 1866

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