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THE SUPERINTENDENCY.

THE NOMINATION,

The nomination of candidates for the Superintendency of the Province, vacant by the resignation of Mr J. Hyde Harris, took place at noon on Saturday, at the ■usual place for such proceedings — Gaol street, at the back of the Supreme Court. "When the Returning Officer commenced the business, there were not 300 persons present ; but the number was subsequently increased to nearly 300. The proceedings were tame enough. There was not, except as regarded Mr Dick, the least anxiety ■shown to test the views of the candidates by means of questions — Mr Clapcott being to retire without a single query being addressed to him; and those to which Mr M'Glashan had to reply coming, as a matter of joke, from one or two persons close in front of the speaker, who alone indulged in election " chaff." Within the railings there was a tolerable muster of •the leading merchants and more active politicians of the city. Mr John Gillies, the Returning Officer, the writ and the advertisement giving notice oi the election, which he had caused to be inserted in the newspapers. He then 'called upon any elector who had a candidate to propose to step forward and do so. and he expressed a hope that all would receive a fair hearing. Mr J. 11. Barr said he had much pleasure in proposing Mr Thomas Dick, us a fit and proper person for the office of Superintendent : and he did so with much ■Confidence, because that gentleman had had a great amount of experience in the affairs of the Province. No other man ■knew so intimately all things connected with the past history and future prospects of the Province — (laughter) — as Mr Dick ; and be (Mr Ba, r r) had, therefore, great confidence in Mr Dick, and felt sure that the electors would show by their votes that they had confidence likewise.—(Applause.) All who knew Mr Dick were aware that he was a man of indefatigable industry. — ("Hi-ar, bear." — A Voice: He has belonged to every Government.) Mr Dick was an upright and honest mm ; and however much they might differ with him in his political opinions, and regret the mistakes which had been made in the past, yet he looked forward with confidence to the electors returning Mr Dick as Superintendent of Otago.— (Applausp.) Mr James Kilgour simply seconded the nomination.

Mr E. B. Caegill proposed Mr Henry Clapcott as a fit and proper person to hold tbe office of Superintendent of t^e Province.—(Cries of "Oh! Oh!"— A Voice: That's a man of powerful intellect, Mr { Cargill.) It was for the electors to form their own opinion on that matter, and he "had no doubt that they would do so impartially. — (Hear, hear.) Mr Clapcott would have an opportunity of explaining his views on the leading topics of the day, it was not for him (Mr Cargill) to say anything on that subject. But as to Mr Clapcott's character and aptitude for business, he had had an opportunity of demonstrating them during the comparatively short time in. which he had taken a part in public business here. Mr Clapcott did not rank among the veteran politicians of the Province — he was rather juvenile in those matters ; but, by his political actions, he had already won the respect and approval of a large number of the people of th : s Province. He begged, therefore, to propose Mr Clapcott ; aud he trusted that when Mr Clapcott came forward he would receive fair hearing and treatment at the hands of the electors. — (Hear, hear.) Mr T. M. WiLKiNsojr seconded the nomination.

Mr W. W. Wilson said he had come forward somewhat singularly to propose an " Old Identity" for the office of Superintendent. I (Hear, hear.) He did so because he believed that that " Old Identity" had no " Old Identity" principles about -him. It might seem somewhat singular that he, a "New Iniquity" should come for-

ward to propose Mr Edward M'Glashan, one of the oldest residents in the Province. (Hear, hear.) He did so, because he was satisfied that we wanted some new blood infused into the Province. — (Laughter. — A Voice : New blood ?) Well, perhaps he ■should have said " new ideas." — (Laughter.) Blr M'Glashan was one of the oldest residents here, and although it might be said that he had taken no prominent part in politics, yet he (Mr Wilson) did not think that those who had taken a part had done much good for the Province. (Hear, hear.) He was not going to bespatter the other ■candidates with mud ; but with respect to Mr Dick he would say, " the least said the soonest mended ;" and with regard to Mr Clapcott, he endorsed all that that gentleman's proposer and seconder had said.— (Laughter.) Mr M'Glashan, although an old resident, had more liberal ideas, and had progressed more with the requirements of the Province, than any other old resident he (Mr Wilson) had met with. It was because he believed in Mr M'Gla3han's liberal principles that he proposed him as a fit and proper person for

the office of Superintendent. He was sure that if they elected Mr M'Glashan they would always find him to be an advocate of progress and advancement, accessible at all times to redress grievances, and ever ready to iuitiate works fot the progress of the Province.— (A Voice: What was it Judge Richmond said about you lawyers ? — Laughter.) Mr Crate said he came forward as a Victorian to advocate an " Old Identity" as being well qualified to act as Superintendent of this Provinse. — (Laughter.) He seconded Mr M'Glashan 's nomination, and he felt sure that if they elected that gentleman they would fi n d that he understood the wants of the Province, and would always keep himself perfectly free and independent of any particular party or clique in the Provincial Council. (Applause.) The Returning Officer asked if there wa3 any other candidate to be proposed.

Mr J. G. S. Grast: Which electoral roll are 3'ou acting upon ?

The Returning Officer : The roll made up for the year ending 30th September, 1864. I may mention now, what I intended to have said before the close of the proceedings, that it is the roll which was made up last year wlvch comes into force at this election. The claims that have been given in this year will not appear on the roll until October next.

Mr Grant: Then I propose that this election be adjourned until the 4th of October. It is a disgrace to the Colony to disfranchise 5000 electors. — (Applause and hisses )

The Returning Officer : I beg to remind you of what you know very well, that we have no power here, and if there is anything wrong you must go to the Legislature to set it right. I hope the election will proceed.

Mr Grant : Yes, that is the letter of the law, sir, but it is not its spirit. If the old roll is to be acted on, it is a disfranchisement of 5000 men. I say that Mr Harris resigned for the purpose of disfranchising five thousand men. I call upon all risrht-minded citizens to retire with me, and to hare another election under the new roll. I leave the hustings in disgust. — (l 4( l 4 Hear, hear," laughter, and hisses, during which Mr Grant retired.)

No other candidate being proposed —

Mr Dick was received with applause. He said : I regret the necessity which occasions my coming before you to-day I regret that Mr Harris has considered it to be his duty — or has felt it right— to resign the office which he held ; becmse I have had the pleasure of working with him in the Government of the Province, and I have found that he was always desirous to advance the best interests of the Province, and that he threw his soul into the work he had undertaken. I regret, then, under these circumstances, that Mr Harris has left the post which I have ventured to ask you to give to me. I regret, further, that the efforts made to secure the services of Major Richardson, have failed. I believe that, Mr Haras having found it necessary to resign, we could not have fallen upon a better man, at present, to fill his place than Major Richar-dson. However, Major Richardson has found that it would not correspond with the duties in which he is at present engaged, that he shoull come forward as a candidate ; or he has some other reason which hs does not assign. Under these circumstances, you are thrown upon others for your choice, and I have ventured to offer myself as a candate for your suffrages. In my address to the electors, which I issued yesterday morning, I have ventured to appeal to my past services in the Province. Mr Wilson has told you that the less there is said about those services, the better. — (Hear, hear.) Very well, lam quite satisfied, if you think with Mr Wilson, that you should refuse me. But, in refusing me, whom do jou fall upon? I have not a word to say against the gentlemen who have been proposed along with me. Mr Clapcott has held the position of Provincial Treasurer, and you have been able to judge of his political abilities as shown in that position. Mr M'Glashan, as Mr Wilson has told j t ou, is a very Old Identity, and not what he calls, in opposi-

tion, a Ne^ Iniquity. lam not going to

say that the " Victorian element," which Mr Crate professes to represent, i 3 an " iniquity," although I would not say, if the members were all like Mr Crate — (a laugh) — that they were the best of men. — (Laughter.) I hope that Mr Crate is not

the best representative of the " Victorian element" you could have brought forward. — (A Voice : Oh ! no fear of that.) I am happy to think that they have been better represented on different occasions ; but I can judge by the position taken by Mr Crate, as to who is the writer of a letter published this morning, and signed " A Victorian," the writer of which talks about " Dick and Moss " in reference to the Land Regulations. I think Mr Crate must have wanted ua to recognise him as the writer of that letter — no doubt, it is most ably written, and will be of great value as a service to the Colony, i— (A Voice: Pat on your hat: you'll

catch cold.) I have been complimented to-day, in the newspapers, along with the other candidates. The Daily Times has favored us all with a very capital character. I have been bespattered by that paper so long, that I care very little about it. It has been the constant object of the Daily Times, ever since it was started, to give me the credit of everything bad that has been done by the Government. I scarcely think that that is fair ; hut I cannot help it. It has been the object of that paper to credit the Supeiinteudent with all the good deeds, and to debit Mr Thomas Dick with all the bad deeds. That is not a very fair mode of bookkeeping. I should have liked a little on the credit side as well as on the debit; but I have not got it, and I have had to be content with what I got. lam surprised that there is not another candidate here before you to-day. We required another — one who was quite of opinion that he was the right man for Otago. If he had been here, he would have been able to judge of the opinion of the electors on that matter. I mean, of course, Mr Julius Vogel. — (A lau^h.) However, he has not ventured to solicit your suffrages ; and notwithstanding the low opinion he has of us, who are candidates, as he is not a candidate, he has not the opportunity of judging of your opinion of him. Now as to the Superintendency. You are all aware that this office is hedged round by a great number of difficulties — perhaps I should not say difficulties, but — hindrances, which prevent the Superintendent from doing what he might consider best. No doubt, both Major Richardson and Mr Harris would have on many occasions done differently, i£they had not an Executive to co-operate with. They might have done better, or they might have done worse — at all events, they have not had the opportunity of carrying out their views, in cousequence of the action of the Executive ; and whoever may be the Superintendent in future, he must not be judged of by the action which is publicly known, because, in many cases, he has to yield to those governing with him. This is a salutary arrangement. It is, I believe, the only way in which we can carry out the Government of the Province ; and, therefore, I have nothing to say against it. Should I be elected to the office, you will at least understand that on many occasions, the acts of the Government are not a earning out of my individual opinions. Nevertheless, I hold that the post of Superintendent is one of high honor — one which is the highest in the Province, and which is worthy of being aspired to by any gentleman resident in the Province. I have, therefore, the honor to ask you to day, to give me your votes for that* high position. If you think me not worthy of it, you will not vote for me, and I will remain aa I am, content to promote the interests of the Province to the best of my ability, notwithstanding what Mr Wilson an(^ o tn er3 miy think of my past services. The ofrLe of Superintendent is a difficult one. On all occasions it is so ; but at present, it is a most difficult one. It is a difficult office when the Go vernment has money to spend ; because thon there is the task of judging how that money may ha judiciously spent. But that is much more ea3y than when there is no money to spend. — (Hear, hear.) When the Treasury chest is empty, we are at our wit's end to know how to get the money necessary for the monthly payment of the Government servants. That is a state of things of which Mr Clapcott no doubt knows something, from his experience as Treasurer. The want of money is a^ thing which the Government feels very deeply, with applications coining in right and left, that this road may be formed, or that public work carried out. The interests of the Province earnestly demand that those roads and works should be carried out, in order that traffic may be continued, pros- | perity be increased, and revenues be kept flowing into the Treasury : but without money such works cannot be attempted. That is wher= the shoe pinches; and we have had necessity for the deepest regret that such a state of things should have existed. But Ido not halieve that it is a permanent state of afliirs: I do not think the Province is so deeply sunk as it has again and again been represented to be : Ido not think it is so thoroughly ruined as it has been endeavoured to show to be the fact. Our gold fields are still really un worked — I believe they are iv their infancy. Daily, we have men laying out money on water-races, sluicing claims, and quartz reefa ; the industry of the country, as regards gold mining, may truly be said to be in its infancy. The wealth of the country ia but now beginning to flow towards that source of settlera.-nt and of revenue. I believe that in a few years, we shall seea very considerable amount invested in mining machinery of different kinds. There i 3, then, our land, which is now being broken up— very little has been done in that way as yet, compared with what i 3 beiag done and will be done. The agriculturists are now

waking to the fact that they have a home market, in which they can. sell produce, it they will grow it; and they are now breaking up their fields to do so, and thu3 to avoid the sending out of the country ol large sunn to pay for wheat, and barley, and oats. They are findinj; now, that there are consumers for them to supply; and that there is no reason why those consumers should send money away to enrich Adelaide, and Melbourne, and other places. I believe thoroughly that our agriculturists are now and only now, waking up fully to the necessity and advantage of laying down their broad acres with produce. Then, we have the pastoral interest, sending at present its quarter of a tnilUon worth of wool annually to England, and spending the money i;i this country,. E believe. It is not only the present produce of wool we have to consider; for I believe that before long such a change will be made that the pastoral lands wi 1 be carrying throe millions of sheep instead of a million; for when the runholdere have to pay a very considerable assessment for their runs, they will find it advisable to stock those runs sufficiently to enable them to pay that assessment, as well as to make it worth their while to continue to hold the lands which they are novr enjoying. I ou^ht, perhaps, to allude tothe Resolutions passed during the last sea» sion of the Council, in reference to the Land Question. I ■ know that there is a very considerable difference of opinion with regard to those Resolutions. I know that there is a feeling — in the agricultural districts, at least — that those Resolutions are too favorable to the pastoral interest. It may be so : we are not faultless in the matter. We are apt to judge wrongly ; and even Provincial Councils may be in error occasionally. It may be that the Provincial Council is in error on this matter; but I think that these who look at our Resolutions in the light I have mentioned, have scarcely given them due consideration. The Resolutions state distinctly that the Land Boird have it in their power to reduce the size of any run above 30,000 acres, to that extent, and to put the surplus into the market by public auction. This will give to any one who is so disposed, an opportunity of bidding for and obtaining a run, for there will be a number of them thus put into the market. The auction system being used, the fair market price will be obtained. But apart from auy runs which the G-overnment may offer, there are generally runs in the market. Within the last twelve or fifteen months,, there have been many so offered, and their market value, at auction, has thus been ascertained. Another diffijul'y raised in connection with the Resolutions, is the land tax. Ido not think that the tax has met with so much objection, as have the Resolutions with regard to runs ; but, still, a great number of persons hold that the tax should not exist. I supported that tax, and lam still of opinion that it should be maintained. We offer land at LI an acre, with a 2s tax, or at L 2 an acre, without the tax. Canterbury offers her Hnd at L 2 an acre, without tax; Southhnd doe 3 the same: and, therefore, we offer more liberal land laws than are offered by either of the adjoining Provinces. We offer to any person who wishes to cultivate it, land at Ll an acre, on condition that he shall pay 2s an acre tax until he has improved it to the extent of 40s an acre ; and I hold that any one who doe» not want land merely as a spjcu'ation, but to live by its cultivation, will be glad to buy on those termi. It is true that land is not selling just now — or that very little is» being sold; and that fact adds to the difficulties of the Government. I do not, however, attribute this to the existence of the tax. Of course, our not receiving money as land revenue is due to the tax, to some extent; for I know seve.ral persons who, but for the tax, would go in and purchase land now, intending bye and bye, perhaps, to cultivate it. But the land is an estate which the Government possesses. We cannot " eat our cake and have it ; " and if we are not now selling nur knd, we have it to sell hereafter. We had far better keep our land unsold now, and have it occupied bye and bye by those who will not only live upon it, but will pay the tax —who mean to be cultivators of the land a3 speedily as possible, and who will thus benefit the country as well as themselves by being producers — than sell it at once for the sake of getting a fewpounds into the Treasury, at the certain cost of having the land lying waste for many years to come. There is one other point to which I think I ought to allude ; and that is, the strong objection I have tothe rule of the General Government that we shall only get three-eighths of our Customs Revenue. It seem to me very hard that we should have so many expenses in connection with the General Government, and yet should only get three-eighths of the Customs. We have the Police and the Gold Fields departments to support : the more people we get into the Province the greater are the expenses of those departments ; and yet the General Government re^ns all, or a larger propor-

tion than we do, of the result in the shape of increased Customs Revenue. It seems to me that this is a most unfair thing; and I think it is a matter which should be constantly and strongly urged upon the Assembly, that the proportion of the Customs given to the Provinces is not fair or equitable, especi-illy in the case of so large a Province as this is. — (Hear, hear.) A circumstance which occurred recentty, in * connection vith the payment of witnesses, created a great deal of scandal. One of the Judges referred to it most censoriously — I do not say, unjustly — and he strongly blamed the Government concerning the fact which recently came to light, that the witnesses in a certain case had not been paid. The matter was taken up in Australia ; and our Government has been censured most severely, and blamed most harshly, because a witness who was brought over from Victoria, had .not been paid his fees and expenses. It it i neither right nor just that the Provincial Government of Otago should bear the blame of what belongs entirely to the General Government of the Colony ; and I want it to be fully known— and for the knowledge to reach to Victoria, it possible — that the expenses of witnesses are not paid by the Provincial Government but by the General Government. It is true that at one time the Province was called upon to pay those expenses; but as none of the fees of Court came into the bands of the Provincial Government, that payment was most justly resisted. It was said, " Give us the fees and the fines imposed as penalties and we will pay the "witnesses ; but if you receive all, you should also pay all." The General Government accepted the position ; and to them should be given the blame of any neglect with respect to witnesses, instead of throwing it upon the shoulders of poor Otago, which has enough otherwise to bear. I am sorry to have detaineJ you so long. I might, of course, say a good deal more; but I feel that it is not necessary on this occasion. I have simply now to promise you, that if I am elected to the high position for which I solicit your suffrages, I will do my utmost to foster all the interests of the Province, as I have hitherto done, without giving undue preference or prominence to one class above another. ''The grextest good to the greatest number," will be my motto, and I will always endeavor to carry it out. — (" Hear, hear," and applause.) The Returning Officer announced that -any questions could be put to the candidate. A good many that were put, came from those standing nearly in front of the candidate, and were asked, and answered in a low toue of voice. Mr Brnr> : Are you in favor of the Educational Tax ? j Mr Dick : If you mean the rate — Yes That is to say, when the people are prepared voluntarily to support edusation, I shall he very glad to see it done and the rate abandoned ; but I think it a thing of the most urgent necessity that the boys and girls of our community should be educated, and until a better way of getting them educated can be found and carried out, I shall support the present system. A Voice : What about retrenchment ? Mr Dick: We have retrenched, from the Superintendent downwards; and I am in favor of continued retrenchment, so as to make the current revenue meet the current expenditure. I think that all the proceeds from sales of land should be spent in the improvement of the country.

Would you be in favor of collecting the Education Rate with the Town Brnrd rate? — I think not. The Town Board have enough to do, without bothering with education.

Is it a fact, that it often costs more to collect the Education Rate than the amount to be collected ? — I am not aware that it is a fact. Are you in favor of the Port Chalmers Railway ? — E am in favor of its being made by a private company, the Government guaranteeing a certain amount on the cost of the work. Do you consider that the present mode of rating for the Education Tax is fair or unfair? — that only houses and other property should pay, altogether careless of a man's means ? — I do not see how we are to reach a man's pocket, otherwise than by means of his property. We cannot tell whether a man has LlO or LIOOO in his pocket : but we can tell what his property, which we see, ought to contribute towards

a rate. But do you consider the present mode of assessment to be fair ? — So far as I can see it, it is the fairest mode that cau be adopted. Mr G. Lloyd : I believe, Mr Dick, you are connected with the squatting interest ? Mr Dick : I am. Mr Lloyd : I feel that I should be inclined to support you ; but I want to know this— As the runs fall in, don't you consider that they, a3 public property, should be ?o treated that, when re-let, they should bring in the greatest amount to the Treasury -which it is possible to obtain, just the same as if you were letting your own private property ?

Mr Dick : Yes ; I. think that we should treat the tenants of the runs just as we would treat them if they were tenants of our private property. Mr Lloyd : Then how can you explain the position which you took as a member of the Government, in supporting the proposal, that the present holders — who have had the advantage for 14 years, at a nominal rent only— should, when the leases fall in, have the right to continue to hold up to 30,000 acres, only the excess above that quantity being put up to auction ?

Mr Dick : How do you account for having supported that ?

Mr Lloyi> : I beg to say that I did not support it — I was highly disgusted at it.

Mr Dick : I thought that iv consideration of the late Government having supported it, you supported it also. I considered that if the present holders were prepared to continue tenants, at the additional rent which theGovernmeat were prepared to impose, they should at least have a chance for renewal of their leases, for once, or for twice, I believe it is. If I had a good tenant in the occupation of a property of my own, and I had resolved to raise the rent, I should say to him, " If you will pay me the higher rent, I ana prepared to continue you as my tenaut." But we do not do that with the runholders ; we considerably cut down the size of the runs before we give the present holders the option. Mr Lloyd : Would you take any steps to try to prevent the last Land Resolutions becoming law? Mr Dick : If I were elected, and there were numerously-signed petitions sent in, asking the Assembly to defer action until the matter had been most fully considered, I should be very glad to forward such petitions to the General Government, and 1 would not oppose their being fully considered.

A Voice : What is your opinion about tolls and toll-gates? — Well, the roads must be kept up. I think if we knocked the tolls on the head, those who ride or drive about would be the first to cry out to have them put on ag-ain. I am not prepared to do away with the tolls. Are you in favor of the sale of agricultural lands on the gold fields? — Yes; under certain necessary restrictions.

Mr Ciapcott was called upon to speak, fie said — It will be for a very short time that I shall_ endeavor to detain you. Before entering upon the subject of my political opinions, allow me to endorse the expression of regret uttered by Mr Dick, that our late Superintendent has thought it more consistent with his public, or with his private, duty to resign the office that he has held — I believe so well, that it will cause very great difficulty to his successor, be he who he may, to win as good an opinion of the general public— (A Voice: He-ah! he-ah !— Loud laughter.) Judging from the faces I see before me, I may be pardoned if I speak a very few ivords touching myself, in order to give some explanation why I am here to-day. F, for the last twelve years, have seen the progress of this place from a very insignificant one to what it is at the present moment. I have watched its rise from a very small hamlet, to its present dimension?. I have seen, also, the country opened up : I have seen many political changes ; and as I rejoice to be able to look forward to continuing inthis country, I hope to see further improvements take place. It will perhaps be well, if you will allow me at once to state what I consider the duties of the Chief Executive Officer of this Province to be. Those duties Ido not consider to be creative. The Superintendent initiates nothing : he is simply the head of the Government, to see carried into effect, with as little delay as possible, the measures laid before him by the Government, who are elected by the people. In other words, the duty of the Superintendent is, to carry out, without delay, the wishes of the people. — (A Voice : But with his own judgment.) Should the Superintendent have any peculiar ideas touching any matter which may be brought "before him, he must at once decide whether he will yield his point iv deference to his Executive, or whether he shall say, " Gentlemen, I cannot agree with you. I will resign my post and become again a private individual, and, as such, I shall be entitled to batde for what I consider to he right." In this Province, there are, as you well know, various interests which should not be conflicting, if the prosperity of the place is to be considered. We have the gold fields interest, we have the agricultural interest, and we have the mercantile interest— all separate, non-conflicting, but tending to WDrk harmoniously together for the public good. I take it that the gold fields interest requires due attention — due fostering ; and I should be glad to see some better tenure given to the miner, so that he might have a lease for some time of the ground which he occupies, which lease by some simple, if possible, legal process, should be easily transferable. I would hold out some hope to the miners of a lengthened tenure of ground, so that they might not only be able but be glad to

bring their wives and families here, and take part in the real settlement of the Province. The pastoral interest must not be overlooked. There are in this Province thousands of acres which, for years to come, will not be fit for anything but pasture. Wool is now a most important item of our exports ; and lam quite sure that, to promote other interests, it will not be necessary to interfere with the pastoral interest. But perhaps one of the most important of our interests is that which I am to mention now. It is an interest which will last for all time. I speak, of course, of the agricul - tural interest. I hope that the progress which has already been made iv respect to it, is but a promise of what we may anticipate. But few of those to whom lam now speaking have seen this Province without a single field of grain growing in it : but from the Taieri to the Mataura, not a single grain of corn was growing when I came here. Things are changed, I am glad to say; but every encouragement and inducement must be given to the agriculturists, to produce what the land is really capable of producing, and that, I believe, is everything which we can require. We have some of best wheatgrowing, oat-growing, barley- growing, and hop- growing land in this Province. Those who have never travelled far beyond Dunedin, know very little of the climate of Otago. Up in the country, during the last summer, I saw done what I did not believe could be done here : I saw wheat being cut in the field, and being threshed without being stacked. To enable that to be done, I think you will admit there must be fine wheat- growing country in Otago. I am better acquainted with the Molyneux than with any other district ; and there, I believe, hops can be grown as good as those grown in Kent. Why should not hop-growing be encouraged, as well as the growing of barley; and then let us brew our own beer from our own produce, and have our own distilleries, too. — (Hear, hear.) It has been brought to your notice to-day, by a letter published in the newspaper — which I confess I only glanced at cursorily — that we expend annually a tremendous sum for spirits. All that money goes out of the place; and I think that the sooner this evil can be counteracted the better. I am most certainly in favor of doing away with any impediment which may now exist with respect to the distillation of spirits in the Province. But to encourage all those interests of which I have spoken, there is only one way which we can depend upon with certainty. Let us open up communication through the country— let us, by all means, devote the first money we can spare to the making of railways — let us bring the remote districts practically near to a sea-port ; and then we shall soon see the whole of the available land producing corn or other u-eful things. But the time has not yet arrived when we can afford to go into a speculation with railways. It would not be wise to encumber the revenue with another loan ; but as soon as our revenue is sufficient to pay the interest of a new loan, then, by all means, let us raise that loan and commence our railways. — (Hear, hear) We have enough to do, however, for some little time, to overtake ourselves — to get the reins into our hands, and to live within our means. The present Government are following out this course. I trust that their endeavors will be crowned with success, and the sooner the work is achieved, the better; for from the day when the first sod of the first railway in Otago is turned, may be dated the real prosperity of every interest in the Prbvince. There are some other points on which, as I am partially unknown to many of you, you may wish to know my opinions. And first, touching the Land Laws. I think that the great cuise of this Province has been, the everlasting tinkering — if I may be allowed the word — which the Land Laws have received. Every session, almost, there has been some alteration — I cannot say improvement ; and nobody knows how long the law is going to remain as it may be at the present moment. It is always being altered according to the whims of the lawmakers for the time being ; and the sooner this plan of dealing with the matter is altered, the better. I, for myself, hope that I shall yet see the whole country thrown open for free selection, at such a price as to render it possible for any person desiring to buy land to get it, without the encumbrance of a tax— that he may select, pay his money, get his Crown Grant, and have done with the matter. With regard to the Education Tax, I am aware that the Education Ordinance is one of the most unpopular Ordinances in existence ; lam aware that the collection of the tax is attended with very great unpleasantness, very great difficulty, and, what is worse, very great cost — that it actually does not pay, in some di-tricts, to collect the tax at all. I know that altered the Ordinance must be. But, at present, we have two evils before us— paying the tax, or taking the chance of the rising generation growing up in ignorance. — (Mr Wilson : Well, let them grow up so.) Anybody will know what such a thing will end in — it must result in crime being increased, as

one const quent evil. I hope the day will come, and shortly, when it will not^bnly be possible for every child in the Province to be educated, but when it will be possible,, also, to devise some less objectionable mode of educating them, thtn that which depends upon a tax. I would now revert again, briefly to the duties of the Superintendent. Provided the Superintendent performs his duties honestly — being no* party-man, and seeking to promote no particular interest — I think the community cannot be very much endangered by any act of his. Up to within a few months, there were some powers delegated by the Governor to the Supermtendent, which powers it was alleged the Superintendent could exercise without the consent or advice of his Executive, he merely being answerable to the Governor for his acts. But a question arose not very long ago, . whether this was the right reading of the law or not ; and the result has been a communication from the Governor, stating that the powers which the Superintendent holds through delegation are to be exercised in exactly the same manner as every other power he holds— namely, with the advice and consent of his Executive. Then, the matter resolves itself intothis: — Without the advice and consent of the Executive, the Superintendent can do no legal act : the Executive are members chosen from the body of representatives : the representatives are chosen by the people. The act of the Superintendent, then, to be legal, must bethe act of the people. Should Ibe sufficiently fortunate to merit your support at the forthcoming election, I trust that what I have stated to-day will be acted upon by myself— that by no temptation may I be led to exercise any power contrary to the wishes of the people, asbrought before me by the Government of the day.

The Returning Officer asked whether any person desired to put a question to Mr Clapcott.

AYoice: Oh! no; he's pretty well explained himself. — Another Voice : He's better than "Richard," ever samuch. — (Laughter.)

Mr M'Glashan, on coming forward, was received with applause. He said — It is certainly a long time since I made a public appearance upon any stage; and now, particularly when I see so large an audience around me, I feel a sensational symptom that makes me fear I shall not be able to state my views with sufficient clearness or distinctness. At the same time, be assured that I shall try my best. It is said by a wise man, " Let your words be few and well chosen." I intend to follow that advice, as far as possible. I do not purpose to make to you a long speech, all wind or gas ; but I shall go at once to thedifferent points to which I wish to allude. lam sure that every gentleman here will take it for granted that I shall be quite willing to enter into a conversation with him on any political or public matter ; and that if I do so, I shall be ready to state my views fully and plainly. The first matter that I consider requires to be looked intoby the Government is retrenchment of the public expenditure : I mean that it must be further attended to, because I admit that retrenchment has been to some extent carried out. ISTo doubt, retrenchment must be effected wisely; for a dueefficiency must be maintained in the different Government departments, otherwise the whole affair will go to wreck. I would endeavor to promote immigration to> the utmost extent of my power. There should be a permanent stream of immigration into the Province. Our agricultural lands, and our auriferous areas, contain untold sources of wealth. The one and the other are ready to the hand of man ; and all that is wanted to make those sources of wealth of great \a ] ue to the country, is labor. I decidedly object to the Education Ordinance. I believe that the expenses connected with the assesors and collectors nearly swallow upthe whole of the amount of the rate. If it is necessary that a system of Government education should be maintained in the Province, I should say that it should be maintained out of the general revenueThere is another important point connected with this education question. If you go into the Land Office, you see a number of maps scattered about, with " Educational Reserves " marked on them. I should like to know what those reserves are for, and whether the Government are making any money out of them at the present time.. I believe that one-thirtieth of the land is devoted as such educational reserves. I would have another course followed. I would have one-thirtieth of the money received for land sold, taken and at once invested, to form a fund for educational purposes. I think that, at present, if the Government were wise, they might very advantageously invest suah money in debentures; those debentures do not aeem to go off very fast in the London market, though what is the cause of that, it, is not easy to say. With regard to the Land Question. I am, like Mr Clapcott,. an advocate of free selection. I do not see why the land should be tied up as>

it has been ; nor do I see why there should be Buch continunl tinkering with the Regulations as we have hitherto had, and which has driven many a one from the country. The Council last session passed a number of Resolutions on the subject; and these, no doubt, will become law, substantially, in the next sitting of the General Assembly. I can only hope that our representatives will consider the whole matter very carefully, and will give us Regulations that are liberal in themselves, and likely to prove stable. As to public works, I am of opinion that the labor of the prisoners should be made as effectual as possible in carrying out important and much-needed works. I would have the prisoners employed in constructing wharfs and jetties at Port Chalmers and Oamaru, and at other places where they are necessary. The work which the Government have been carrying on here, in levelling Bell Hill, may be a very important one, but I cannot see it to be so.

A Voice': And you'd encourage immigration, while you wre keeping the prisoners on the pubic works ? Mr M'Gi.ashaii : Yes, I would. The Voice: Ve-ry good, Sir. — (Laughter.)

Mr M'Giashas : The Government, with which I btlieve Mr Dick was connected at the time, endeavoured to divert public attention from this mode of reclaiming land, in favor of that of building sea walls and taking mud out of the harbor to back up w'th. They sent to England for a costly steam dredge, but they have never used ir, although by using it they would have deepened the harbor and made land for sale at the same time. But the best of men may err ; and I am sure that I give to Mr Dick credit for the best desires and intentions to promote the interests of the Province. The gentleman who proposed me told you that the less said about Mr Dick, the better. I don't agree with that, altogether. I think that Mr Dick, probably, under all the circumstances, is the best man for the place we are now aspiring to. He has had much experience, and that ought to go a long way. He has had much experience in Provincial matters, from his youth upwards, I might almost say.— (A Voice: Why don't you vote for him, then ?) I can assure you, if I was not a candidate, I would give my vote for Mr Dick. I promised not to detain you long, gentlemen; and although there are many other subjects which I might speak about — and especially the claims of the mining interest — I will keep my precise. If I should, through your confidence in me, be chosen for the very important office I now seek, I shall be prepared to discharge its duties to the very best of my ability. I know that the office is surrounded with great difficulties : and had I acted upon my first thought, I should not have been here before you I now ; for I had determined not to come forward as a candidate, and I only consented to stand, in consequence of the urgent solicitations of my friends. I now leave myself in the hands of the electors, trusting that I shall receive their suffrages at the forthcoming election. A Voice : Sir, are you connected with I Dunedin Punch?

Mr M'Glashan : 3STo ; lam not. TheVoics: Oh! I thought you were, and they'd stnt you here to make us laugh —you're so funny.— (Laughter.) Another Voice : What do you mean to do with your immigrants when you've got them here ?

Mr M'Glashan : Employ them, if we can, on public works.

The Voice: And if you can't, what then? You'll send them back again, I suppose.

Mr M'Glasha-n : If I believed there was no need for immigrants here, I should he the very last man to induce them to come here. I believe that ultimately there will be a large number of men emp^yed on the gold fields ; and I understand that at present very good wages are being paid — L 4orL 5 a week, I believe.

A Voice : Ah ! you never had your blanket at your back, up there, old boy. — (Laughter.) In reply to another question, Mr M'Glashan said — I certainly should like to see distillation carried out in the Province; and I dont see why we should pay so much for beer.-— (A Voice : That's a great objection, certainly. — Laughter.) The Returning Officer called for a show of hands for each candidate ; and he announced the numbers to be— For Dick, 110; Clapcott, 10; M'Glashan, 150 (about). The announcement was received with applause. The Returning Officer: According to the show of bands, Mr M'Glashan is the elected person. Mr Dick demanded a poll. The Retorning Officer said that the poll would take place on Friday, the 4th of August. In Dunedin, there would be two polling places— one the Court House, and the other the North Dunedin School. It would save a great deal of trouble, if it was perfectly understood , that only those whose names were on the roll made up last September -would have the right to

vote. The result of the poll would be declared (if possible) on Friday, the 11th August, at noon, at the Court House.

" Three cheers for M'Glashan." were called for and given.

Mr M'Ge.aßhait: I beg to thank you very sincerely for the kindness manifested to me, by the show of hands to-day. Now that I have come into the contest, I am rather ambitious to be placed at the head of the poll ; and I hope that you will do your Lest to place me there. Should Ibe so fortunate as to be so placed, you may depend that I shall do my best to. look after the interests of this very large and important Province. I beg to propose a vote of thanks to Mr Gillies, for his conduct as Returning Officer. The motion was agreed to ; and this terminated the proceedings.

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Bibliographic details

THE SUPERINTENDENCY., Otago Witness, Issue 712, 21 July 1865

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8,293

THE SUPERINTENDENCY. Otago Witness, Issue 712, 21 July 1865

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