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News of the Week.

[from the daily times.]

Some excitement was manifested in town yesterday by a report that four men had applied for and been granted a prospecting claim in a gully within eight miles of Dunedin. On inquiry we found this to be true. A man named Lee, and three mates having struck a patch of 'payable 'gold on a small stream running into the Silver Stream, immediately above the crossing of the West Taieri road ford. They appear to have been working on a small flat' for the Jast four months, and to have scarcely made wages, but on Thursday, at a depth of about eight teet they came upon a narrow lead which yielded 3£ ounces in about 2\ days. It is not anticipated that there is auriferous ground .sufficient in area to support a large population.

On Sunday last a hive of bees belonging 'to Mr Andrew Hogg, of Craigielea, Wakari, threw off a swarm. The same hive swarmed five times last season. "We notice that Mr Saunders, who represented the Waimea (Nelson) district in' the House of Representatives; has resigned his seat in the Assembly. The Calcutta Sweep on the Ascot Vale Stakes was drawn on Tuesday at the Empire Hotel, and was readily filled. Only the favorites Maidstone and Druid fetched high rates.

The bank clerk, Murdoch, in Nelson, charged with misappropriation of £3700, the property of the Bank of New Zealand, appears to have been in receipt of the munificent salary of £75 per annum !

At the Police Court on Tuesday, John G Skinner, late in charge of the Dunstan Branch of the Bank of jNew Zealand, was committed to take his trial »t the next Criminal Ses-. sions, on the charges of forgery and embezzlement.

The Chief Postmaster has furnished us with the monthly return for October of the number and amount of money orders issued and paid. There have been 528 issued, representing £2282 9s 6d ; and 230 paid, amounting to £1183 17s sd. These, added to the numbers previously issued and paid, make a total since the commencement of the system, of 11,631 issued, for £58,729 83 7d ; and 3337 paid, to the amount of £16,554 16s lOd.

At the Police Court, Queenstown, on the Ist instant, Lawrence Sullivan was committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions for assaulting Constable Daly with an axe, and inflicting upon him serious injury. The assault arose out of a disturbance at'a at Nokomai, to which the accused was a party, and the constable had been called in to sup. press. He was admitted to bail in £400Two persons named Boucher and Keally, who were of the same party, were fined £10 each.

The Southland Times is strongly averse to the re-election of Dr Menzies to the Superintendency of Southland. It says : — "Shonld the electors consider that Dr Menzies is a fit and proper person to represent them in the Council, there still remains the question of the Superintendence, and on that point there'is an unmistakeable feeling that he shonld not sgain be caHed to the office. There we are quite sure that the majority are agreed, and the only thing to decide on is his successor. This must be determined at once. Since' Mr Holmes will not accept the Superintendency, we must, perforce, look elsewhere, and we have not far to look. Circumstances have occurred since Mr Heale left the Province which render it probable that he would be willing to respond $0 & general call from the people. . Let this call be made without delay. It will be a lasting disgrace to the Province if Dr. Menzies is allowed to be Superintendent again on any grounds whatever, but especially on the' ground that no one else eau be found to take jris place. Absurdity can go no iurther,"

Gold is reported to have been discovered ib the northern territory of Australia. Active steps are being taken to promote colonisation in that country, and numbers of persons have left Adelaide for the new colony,

The Southland " Daily News" states that intelligence of a very favorable character has again reached town, from the Nokomai. We are informed that upwards of 700 persons are working on the grounds, and that most are doing very well. Accessions are also being daily made to the number of diggers. We understand that the parties, as yet, have not got down on the lower part of the creek — we mean the cart at the junction with the Mataura. On the Nevis, some parties are endeavouring to take up the lead which was so successfully-followed last year, by three or four parties.

New buildings for commercial purposes are constantly being erected in Dunedin. Some of them are intended to meet the requirements of new branches of trade ; while others are necessitated because of the extended operations of those concerned, or because brick erections are not only 'safer, but in many respects cause a saving of money, as compared with those of wood, whteh were of necessity put up during the early days of Otago's rapid development under the stimulus of the Gold Fields. Of the former class, may now be mentioned the wool store of Messrs Driver, Maclean and Co. in High street. Auction sales of wool in the colonies have become an institution in Victoria and elsewhere ; and their advantages to sheep farmers are admitted to be many and great. In j Dunedin, the system was commenced last season, and as it has already established itself in the favor of nearly all interested in the sale of wool, its permanence and extension may safely be predicted. Messrs. Driver, Maclean and Co. have warehouse room for over 2000 bales ; and already, as we have before announced, thf first lot of the season has been received, and is lying in their main building. The warehouse is of brick and stone, and is very substantially-finished. It has been found that with wooi, as with most other things, there is a peculiar light in •which its qualities can be best and most easily ascertained ; and this light, as tested in Melbourne by Messrs Goldsbrough and Co., seems to be that which results from colouring the interior of the place in which it is being shown, a rather faint misty blue. ' This has already been done in the store in High street, and it will be completed as soon as possible. A sale of wool is annonnced ior an early date by Messrs Driver, Maclean, and Co, and also by Messrs M'l/mdress, Hepburn and Co, of Manse street. At present, part of the floor of the store of the first-named firm is occupied by a couple of pens, in which are the Negretti and Rambouillet rams recently brought from Melbourne by the Gothenburg, and which are to be sold by auction on Monday next. The wool of these rams is surprisingly thick and long ; and as the pedigreea are unquestionable, sharp competition may be expected. — On the reclaimed land, two large buildings of brick and stone are being erected. One of them is a bonded store, &c, for Messrs Cleve and Lazarus. It will cover an area 135 feet 6 inches by 81 feet, and will be 35 feet high, from the floor of the basement to the top of the cornice. This . stora will have the great advantage of being wholly bounded by streets, namely Crawford 'street, Water" street, Bond street and Liverpool street. It will be of three storeys. The basement will be of bluestone, oa a concrete foundation, the upper storeys being of brick." The Jour fronts of the building will be treated architecturally, and will embrace a series of semicircular archesi and rusticated piers, on the latter being a rusticated ordonnance, to carry the cornice, &c, in imitation of Vignola's block entablature. The building has been designed, and "its erection ia under the superintendence of Mr P. Keir, architect, who was a member of the firm whose design for the Parliament House in Melbourne was carried out, and who personally superintended the work. The contractor is Mr George Connor, and the building is being proceeded with rapidly. It will be a most substantial ■erection, and is excellently situated for a bond. Nearer to Rattray street than this store, the new warehouse of Messrs Dalgety, Rattray, and Co. has already been carried ■considerably above the height of the first storey. It is being constructed of brick, whh Oamaru ■tone dressings ; and it will be Blft. long, ■48ft. broad, and. 30ft. high ; there being no partially sunk storey, as in the case of the bond. This building will also stand detached, by a riglit-of-way on each side and a street at each. end. The architect is Mr D. Ross ; the contractors, Messrs Anderson and Lambeth ; and the sub-contractor, Mr R. Craw«haw. Private letters from Havelock do not give Tery encouraging accounts of the mining prospects in Marlborough. By permission we are enabled to give the substance of one under date Octob r 26th. The writer says, " The diggings do not look very encouraging as nQthing is to be done but to take up some q£ the old river and tur.n or flume it. The new rushes which occurred previously to my landing turned out nothing. Thomas Lynch and I have been digging since our arrival, vre can do nothing, as it has rained every day we have been here; I should feel some encouragement to atop if other parties were getting gold, but they are all waiting for the river going down. This country is harder to travel in than Otago. Provisions are very dear, and it takes a lot of money to keep a man when he is doing . nothing ; all speak well of tho river, if dry weather set in, and say plenty of gold would then be got, but I believe it is worked already mit was very shallow. Still one does not know what may turn up here."

We learn from the Marlborough papers that a clerk named Murdoch, late in the employment of the Bank of New Zealand at Picton. and recently in charge of the Bank agency at Deep Creek, has been arrested at Nelson, charged with embezzlement. His defalcations are said to amount to £3000. He was brought before the bench at Nelson, and remanded to a future day.

The " Southland Times" says that a rumor has obtained currency; during the past day or two that an offer has been made to the Government by a gentleman who, for a bonus of £8000, agrees to advance the sum of £GO,OOO, to be expended in the completion of the lines of railway from the Bluff to Win ton — said sum of .£60,000 to bear interest at the rate of ten per cent.

The "Cornwall (Tasmanian) Chronicle" speaks in very hopeful terms of the auriferous prospects of that colony. It says: — " The grold exhibited by the manageraof the Bank of Van Diemen's Land, at the Hobart Town meeting on Thursday — some 500oz from Fingal—speaks volumes for the auriferous richness of that locality. The indications of science and the experimental operations of practical diggers assure us of the existence of the precious metal in many other parts of the colony besides Fingal. Mr Hargravt-s will visit these spots, examine them with a practical eye, trace the indications to their source, and, is we hope, so report our gold prospects as to bring amongst us some thousands of those hardy men who have acquired such a stock of practical gold mining experience in Victoria, and who made the fortunes of Southland and Victoria."

The following particulars of the Canterbury West Coast diggings, are from the leremakau correspondent of the " Lyttelton Time-":— "Nothing of any importance having taken place on the Creek at the date of the last steamer's departure, I deferred writing until this mail. The weather appears to have broken up, and since the date of my last letter we have had two heavy freshes ; but, fortunately, no accident has happened, save the capsizing of a couple of canoes, and the loss of the provisions which were being carried in them up the Teremakau. A considerable number of persons are still coming to this reported gold field, both by the Nelson steamer and by the overland road from Canterbury. It has long been known that gold existed in the Kapatea Creek,' running into the sea three miles south of the Teremakau ; ami it being now prospected «nd fbund to contain a little gold, some 50 or 60 people have taken up ground, and commenced to put their chums in working order. The ground is, however poor ; the best of it paying at present only about £5 a week per man. The ground most easily worked is only some four miles from the sea shore, and is of that fossiliferous clay slate extending: from the Grey and further, north to the Hokitika southward, running parallel to the beach at a distance of ten or twelve miles inland. This bed of clay slate is covered with a heavy body of drift, in some places sixty feet in depth, containing a little gold, and is intersected by several rivers and many creeks. The water having cut a channel through the clay, and the drift and gravel being carried to sea, a little payable gold is occasionally found in those watercourses, as the Greenstone Creek first proved and the Kapatea has now confirmed. As it is quite possible that interested or ignorant parties may give an exaggerated or false statement of this new rush, I have thought it better to state the plain truth about its goldbearing capability, so that no person may be induced by the hue and cry of " New Rush," to rush heedlessly away from remunerative employment. 200 people may, perhaps, make wages on the Kapatea ; but certainly not more, unless the higher part of the creek, which has not yet been ex> plored.may prove auriferous. I purpose, as soon as I can find an opportunity, to run the 'stream to its head and find out whether it runs to the main range between the head of the Wainihinihi and the Arahura, or springs from the foot of the Te Hewera ' range; or whether, as it appears to me most probable from the color of the water, it comes from some unknown and unnamed lake. Other parties are now prospecting the Arahura and the Hokitiki, so it is quite probable that some discoveries of importance may speedily take place. The population on the Greenstone s the Kapatea, and other places, including storekeepers, shantie keepers, packers and others, may be estimated roughly at 500. Of this number, I should judge only 200 or 250 men are getting payable gold. The Maori population is considerably increased by all the Haories having left the Buller and taken up their quarters here. They have exercised a very bad influence on the natives of this coast ; and earning plenty of money by taking provisions np the rivers in their canoes, they spend*all they earn in spirituous liquors, with which they are liberally supplied, and men and women are often seen so drunk as to be hardly held responsible for their actions. It is a great misfortune that old Taramihi is dead, as he was the only man on the coast calculated to enforce obedience and order among the natives here. The Hopeakoa is almost deserted, and from the nature of the river and the wet weather now setting in, no chance of its being well tested will occur until after Christmas. lam thankful to say that peace and order prevail here, and miners having any disputes are in the habit of settling them by appointing referees, instead of going to fisty cuffs, as in other places has too often been the case."

A proclamation is published in this week's " Gazette " authorising the importation of cattle, provided they are free from disease, into the Port of Otago from Southland, and also authorising the driving of cattle from Southland into the District of Otago declared to be infected.

The Calcutta Sweep on the "Melbourne Cup" was drawn on Saturday evening, at the Empire Hotel. Most of the subscribers were persons who, from their former connection with Victoria, feel considerable interest in the race. The auction sale of the various horses was very spirited, the favorites, Musidora and Roebuck, fetching very long prices. Falcon, Bunker, and Rose of Denmark also found purchasers. This evening there will be a Cilcutta Sweep on the "Ascot Vale Stakes," at the same place, and under the same management.

The holiday was celebrated at Port Chalmers by the shipping firing royal salutes and showing all their colors ; by those on shore possessing flaEStaffs and guns doing the same ; and by the Naval Brigade marching out, firing salutes, and performing loyal tunes on the brass instruments which they have recently acquired. The Pork was also enlivened by the arrival of excursion parties from town per steamer, and the departure of sundry pic-nic parties to choice spots in the neighborhood. The appearance of the Naval Brigade was most creditable. They marched \re\l ; they did their saluting and file-firing well ; and considering that the band Ims only had a fortnight's practice, they played remarkably well. All die evolutions of the corp?, and their handling of arms indicated close attention to drill, and their loyalty they expressed by firing a feu de joie both at the Recreation Ground and Mr Taylor's paddock, and by vociferous cheers during the firing of salutes from that gentleman's battery.

Another melancholy story of children lost in the bush is furnished by tha Ballarat Star. It is as follows :: — vt At about nine o'clock on the morning of the 3rd October, Mary, aged five years, and Henry, aged three years, the eldest children of Mrs Anne Morden, of Mount Doran, left the hut after breakfast, and with the sons (aged four and three years) of Mrs Way, a sister of Mrs Morden, went up the track' leading by the front of the dwellings. What direction they took is unknown, but it was supposed that they had not gone far, and were playing about the huts. Two hours having elapsed, Mrs Morden thought the children were stopping too long, and went in search of them. She found her child Mary and Mrs Way's children about a mile from tho place whence they had strayed. The boy Henry Morden was nowhere to be seen, and his mother fruitlessly called him by name in every direction. The other children could only inform her that they had left him sitting under a log with a bunch of flowers in his hands. Mrs Morden thereupon took the three children home, and gave the alarm to the neighbours. They all went out, and searched for miles round," but could not find any trace of the boy. Search I was kept up daily that week, and on Sunday, 9th instant, there were fully a hundred people tin pursuit, but without success. It was uot until Saturday afternoon that any tidings were heard of the lost one, and then a butcher named Michael Fallan came and . told Mrs Morden that he had that day found the remains of a child in the bush. This man, who resided about half way between Mount Doran and the Moorabool run, had been out looking for a bullock that had strayed away on the previous Monday, and found it in a gully near the Moorabool rim. On returning home with the bullock, in company with Richard Groves, he found a child's skull, quite .perfect, and then made search for the body, which they found about twenty yards further up the gully, lying back uppermost. The clothing was partly on the hody, and partly torn off and lying near it. Tho place whore the body ; was found was about three and a half miles from Mrs Morden 's residence. At the inquest held on Sunday, Mrs Way identified the child by the clothing found near and upon the body, as all the flesh being off the head and faco, that means of identification was lost. The jury returned the following ver> diet .- — ' His death took place about the 4th inst. in the Moorabool Ranges, near the Lai Lai Waterfall, and was caused, as we believe, by exhaustion, from want of food and expoaure to cold and rain."

A correspondent writes from Waipori : — " Mining affairs look very healthy at Waipori. Large areas are being taken up, and ere long a large number of hired men will be employed. The miners are also gathering in large numbers in the Lamrnerlaw Range's, and. along the various sources of the Deep Stream, all the way across from Waipori to the Serpentine."

It will sbe within the recollection of our readers that the progress of the fire in George street, which occurred some few weeks ago, was arrested by pulling down a small store by the Fire Brigade. At the time, ' the promptitude and decision of Lieutenant Robinson, who that night had command o the Brigade, was highly commended, as had he hesitated, not only would the store in question have been inevitably destroyed, but, in all probability, the fire would have extended its ravages to much of the contiguous property. The store belonged to Mr Hildreth, who has instituted proceedings against Mr Robinson for the recovery of £500, its alledgcd value. Whatever the legal aspect of the claim, it seems to fall with peculiar hardship on the members of the Brigade, that not only should they endure loss of time, and fatigue, and encounter risk of accident to life and limb— voluntarily, for the welfare of their fellow townsmen, but be subjected to legal annoyances for taking the only step possible, to prevent the spread of a destructive fire. Such a proceeding if persisted in, must tend to paralyze their efforts on all future occasions, even if it does not induce them to withdraw from a service beset by so many physical dangers, and legal difficulties. It is devoutly to be hoped that no such result will follow.

It is surprising to see What an amount o ~ j morbid sentiment exists in, Australia. We notice that the horse of Gardiner, the highwayman, was sold by auction, at Sydney, for £125, and was afterwards shipped to Mel-* bourne, where it fetched the sum of £172!

At the Picton Resratta, held .on the lsfc instant, a melancholy accident occurred, which is thus described by the Marlborough Tress :— " A sailing-boat— the Greenwich— with four men, was seen steering for the jetty with sails all set, the little craft careening over to its- gunwale's, edge under the strength of the breeze. Onward it came at a fast pace, rising buoyantly upon the crests of the waves, when suddenly a cry of horrdr-wasc raised by the bvstanrters looking on the' water from the left side of the jetty which thrilled through every nerve of those" who heard it. Shrieks from women followed, and man instant every eye was turned in the direction pointed out. Tha boat hnd .suddenly capsized, as suddenly sunk, and four *sonls,were seen struggling in the water for life. *To the boats, to the bbatsf ■ were the words from a hundred voices. ' A guinea for the first boat; to the spot,' ciied a man rushing down to the steps, and in a few seconds 3 or 4 boats, manned by strong and able rowers, were pulling in the direction of the catastrophe. Four men were still above the wwaterr r struggling desperately for life. But soon . there was a second shout of horror. One head had disappeared below the surface, and was never seen torise again. Three men now were to be saved. At this time full a dozen boats were palling with more than racing speed towards the spot, and all became a confused sight from the wharf. The heart of every spectator palpitated with excitement, so deeply anxious were all to ascertain who had been saved or who lost. Presently several boats were seen pulling in the direction of the shore, when 1 the fate of those in the capsized boat was speedily ascertained. Three had beett saved, and one had gone to his long accouat, a watery grave closing so suddenly and so cruelly over his earthly career. Every effort; was made to recover the^lost body without avail. A pamphlet has been published by a resident in Otaao, who describes himself a practical sheepbreeder, with the, view of drawing attention to the advantages of fostering a breed of sheep suitable to the climate and capabilities of the Province. The Information is given in the form of a table, giving a series of calculations based upon known results. The writer haa arrived at the conclusion, after a variefcv of experiments, that New Zealand is remarkably adapted, by soil and climate, for the " production of all the best European . grasses." and states thst his experience, confirmed by the late Mr Rich, convinced him that a breed of- valnable long-woolled sheep would thrive well, both on the seaboard and in the interior of the country. The number of ewes taken as the basis of the calculations is 2000, which he estimates, at 71bs of wool per fleece, would give a clip amounting to 13,3001bs the first year. There are coinmns .estimating the proceeds df sheep sold, valued at 30s each ; of wool, at Is 3d per lb ; annual proximate expenses and net annual returns' over a period of 25 years. It must be evident that the annual increase in the number of sheep and the quantity of wool and mutton for sale during that period, can be arrived at with a greater degree of certainty than the amount which could be realised. 1 Without aspiring to the character of a prophet, for s instance, it may fairly be inferred that unless the population of New Zealand multiplies with unwonted rapidity, sheep not continue for many years to realise 30s each, and therefore, in view of the many changes that must inevitably take place in their market value, it may not have, been wise to give an estimate of what that may be 25 years hence. Quite sufficient .inducement is offered by the probable numerical increase in the flocks, for capitalists to turn their attention to sheep feeding. For ' instance, cornmeneinff with the standard number of 2000, at the end of the first five years it is estimated that the flock would number 12,263; at the end of ten years. 28,045 ; in fifteen years, 65,693 ; in twenty years, 146,763 ; and ia twenty-five year 3 322,352.- In reference to these calculations, the writer says they f tend to shew the' road- most of the colonial millionaires have travelled in the attainment of their wealth, several of whom, originally in no better circumstances than many humble colonists among us, have princely names, equal to most, and superior to many members ot the English aristocracy." Ho expresses an opinion that the figures will " stagger many readers, the sceptical will doubt their accuracy, whilst some British farmers who have always worked within prescribed limits would scarcely believe the flgnres if calculated by themselves. They have, however, already passed the ordeal of -examination by a,fe*F acute practical men, and it would be well if experienced men at homo who find difficulty in securing farms; and possess means to work with, will give their attention to , the facilities for extension and that certain increase of capital alluded to." The expense' of this little work bears no proportion whatever to the labour bestowed on its compilation. It is to be bought for one shilling, and ! whether to the capitalist undecided how profitably to invest his money, or to the theorist anxious to form an estimate of the pastoral capabilities ot the colony, it contains information highly snggestive. i

The Built/ Southern Cross, of the 27th. October, says :— " A fact that came to' our knowledge yesterday throws a light upon theproclamation which serves to interpret it pretty accurately. The Governor has despatched the chiof Te Wheoro up the Waikato, to the rebels still in arms, whom he is to visit, with the message whether it is to be peace or war, and giving them to the 10th December }*< decide."

On Friday, the 4th instant, two dejputations from the Chamber of ComJmerce had interviews with His Honor, the Superintendent. Both were introduced by Mr. R. B Martin, president of the Chamber. The first deputation bunded 10 his Honor the resolutions adopted «t the meeting on the ;jrd

inst, refpc-ctiiif; tlif opening of the poets for the impoi tafion of cattle. The resi lutions vere briefly enforced by niembfis of the d'j-

putation ; it being remaiked that niuay observations were not necessary, because of the ■decisions announced by His Honor to the deputations that had waited npon him with the publicly signed petition and the petition on behalf of the meeting held in the Princess ! Theatre. His Honor said he was glad the -Chamber had taken up the subject ; for he thought it was a most legitimate one for an ■expression of the opinion of tho Chamber, and that it had been most properly dealt with at the meeting. Mr Martin said it was very satisfactory to the deputation to hear this, seeing that one gentleman of influence, •who spoke at the metting, had expressed a contrary opinion, adding that the representations of the Chamber would not be attended to. His Honor recapitulated what he had promised the previous deputations he would do. _ Already, the proclamation with respect to importation from Southland had been issued ; and he had also appointed a Commission to inquire into the subject generally. The deputation might lie assured that the ■whole question would continue to receive his earnest attention.— -The second deputation, with reference to the extension, of the jurisdiction of the Resident Magistrate's Court, presented to His Honor the following memorial : — " His Honor John Hyde Harris, Esq. . Sn ierintendent of the Province of Otai;o. "The Memorial of the Dune'Hn Chamber of Commerce. i "E'specttully Sheweth— That the mercantile and general public of the Province of * v tngo are suffering gr»at loss aad inconvenienca from the ■want of a tributai at which claims ov^r L2(J am fee promptly heai d and decided en, without having recourse to the Court. "It is within the knowledge of your memorialists that numbers of claims are constantly brought before t!>e R-sitlent Ma;»i<trafc<>, in which the amounts are reduced often o1o 1 e-half to briDfr them witiiin the jurisdiction of that Court, and the losses thereby incurred amount annually to a Tery !an;e sura. Tho claimants are driven to adopt tbi* course rather tban incur the delay and expen c (often double the amount of the dpht) entailing by waiting for the following sittings of the Supreme Court, or the risk that iv the meantime the debtors may realise their properties and leave the'piace. The present unsatisfactory state of the insolvent Jaw-, aff ,nh no practical remedy to the creditor- in suc!i cx«es, which have been very frequent during the pa^t year in Dunedin. j "The amount of busine-s brought before tbe j Besident Magistrate in Dunedin i° alrevty more ! than one otticia! can properly overtake, and your I memorialists do not consider thfit extending the jurisdiction of that Court, -without, the appointment of another migutrate, would meet the casa They, therefore, hetr respectfully that you will j tirge upon the Government the propriety of introducing nn Act at the coming Sessjoa of the General As-emb'y. to enable it to establish, without delay, Courts similar to thos^ which formerJj existed in New Zetland, ami were known as the District Courts ; giving ti.e Judges (wfto ought to be competent Jawypr^ jurhdictina up toLIOO, and making the sutin»s fortnightly, or monthly, as necessary. *' Suoli a tribunal established in this T\ty, where cases between L2O and LIOO conUl be promptly and inexpensively declJerl, would be of incalculable benefit to the public ; and your memorialists, therefore, earnestly press the matter on yonr attention. **Btened on behalf of the members of the Chamber of Commerc, at Dunedia, ths 3-d day of November, 18G4. " R. B. Maetin, Chairman."

His Honor said he felt that the subject was one of importance. He would at once for- , ward the memorial to the General Government ; and ha would do what he could to promote the object of the Chamber.

An adjourned sitting of the Supreme Court waaheld on Tuesday, under the Debtors and Creditors Act. The case of Henry Hill, contractor, was called on. Mr Hill .appeared in person. Mr Barton appeared on behalf of the trusteeSi and said this matter had been settled along with all the actions dependent upon it. He waa now willing to consent to Mr Hill's release. A deed of conveyance in "this estate -had been executed by the Registrar, in obedience to an order of Court. The order of Court now was, that upon Mr Hill .entering a confirmation of the conveyance of his estate and effects to the trustees appointed by the Court, he be discharged from custody, but •with the consent of the trustees. The reserved' case of William Waterman Dunbat was called on, and the insolvent appeared . After a short examination by the Judge, the facts elicited in which were reported at a previous sittin"of the Court, the Judge said the conduct of the petitioner as a mercantile man was reprehensible, and he would mark the seDse of the Court by suspending the certificate fora short time. Mr Ward said the petitioner had already been in prison for five months. The Judge said the order of the Court would bo that the insolvent was not entitled to relief under the Act, until the expiration of six months from the date of his first imprisonment. The Court adjourned sine die. i

A meeting of the Directors of the Caledonian Society of Otago was held on We3s nesday, at M'Cubbin's Hotel, Mr A. G. Allan m the chair. The minutes of the pretious meeting having been read and conSrmed, a letter from hie Honor the Superintendent vas read granting the use ot ths North Unnedin Cricket Ground for the forthcoming games. The honorary secretary was instructed to acknowledge the receipt of the letter, thanking the Executive for the liberal manner in which the Society's application had »een received.

The North Dunedin Rifle Corps, according to advertisement, held a meeting at their drill shed on Monday evening, when Adjutant Graham vWtPd them for the purpose of swearing thwn in. A'l/nit; ">0 members were present, ;ii:fl we uii'ltTsiunt th-H the contingent to_Nu. 1 Company in North East Valley intend joining them.

Mr Warden S"inp«o^, "mini:; from Mount Buixer, aiuW date '2inh OroVr, says : 'This week I re<;r j t tn Jn/.,- to report a rather disastrous .icoi<!»sn, which occurred to the large race out ot tho Tuviot stream, by reason of which no fewer than seven parties of sluicers have been suspended from work This race was very ingeniously carriei through a large fissure in the rock, at a height of some sixty feet, and which fissure was about 120 feet in depth, and about 50 in length. For some time back the owners of the race have observed that the outer side of the fissure, or that next the stream, has been moving, from some cause or other, and on Thursday last it showed such visible symptoms of falling altogether, that, seeing no possibility of doing anything to avert such a catastrophe, they turned all the water in the race on it, with the view of assisting the mountain, as it appeared, in its downward career, and in a short time it was seen to move out gradually, and then fall in mass, almost damming up the Teviot, and crushing and tearing everything around it, including about 150 feet in length of the flumin;>. It is impossible to say the thousands of tons of rock which were, hurled to the ground in mass. But unfortunately this is not the only accident to tins race" this week. On Friday and Saturday it blew a gale, such as seldom' we experience, and about 100 feet in leu gth of the fluraing of the race was torn from its fastenings, and actually carried up the hill for about 200 yards. When such was the case, it is not to be surprised at that many of the frail buildings in the township were laid low. The owners of the race, nothing daunted, however, by these disasters, have vigorously set to work to repair the damage" caused, which will not only be a work of difficulty, but also of some danger, so satisfied are they with the investment. In other parts of the district, I am glad to report that lately an improvement is observable in mining matters. This week Ihcie was a sort of rush to the bank of the river, near the Dumbarton Rnck, and a number of claims have been taken up. A party of sluicers who had set in there during the last fortnight, have had excellent prospects for that sort of work, and that has attracted attention. The scarcity of water is a drawback, as the stripping is heavy, but a large .party lias been formed to bring in several heads from a creek a little distance off. On the Pomahaka the population is increasing still, and works of soino magnitude are being commenced. Thi3 week I have been applied to for jjennission to bring up a large tail race to a piece of ground lying be tween rhe Upper and Middle Junction, by a party who have also made application for an acre of ground there. The demand for water to sluice with on the banks still keeps up, and it is only to be regretted that there are not many more available creeks. The miners are tired of knocking about, and prefer steady work, though less remunerative. Estimated population : miners, 500 ; others, 200."

Mr E. 11. Carew, officer in charge at Nevis, Nokomai, writing thence on the 29th ult. remarks :— " Two small rushes have occurred* during the week. The first, on Monday, occasioned by ' Wall and party (5) having in fire days obtained twenty-one ounces of coarse go^d at the lower end of an old gully workings, opening into an extensive flat, about nine miles above this camp. No other claims have yet struck gold there, and before the ground can be fairly tried a long tail race will be requisite. If a lead can be traced into the flat (as expected) the rush will assume considerable importance. The second rush (on Thursday) was on the flat adjoining 'the Nil Desperandum claim. From the only paddock bottomed a prospect of two pennyweights to a dish was washed, and several small nuggets picked from the washdirt. The weather ha-s been warm, the river is consequently high."

The following is extracted from the Southern Cross of the itfth October :— " We understand that the tenor of the dispatches received by the Governor by the last mail is that the war is to be carried on vigorously to the complete subjugation of the rebels, and that on this condition the troops will not be withdrawn until that desirable object is achieved. Not having the confidence of his Excellency, we are of course not prepared to speak with any precision on the subject ; but we believe that what we have stated will be found to be correct. Fight and subdue the rebels, or accept the alternative of agreeing to the withdrawal of the troops, are the terms said to be offered ; and we think the colonists' representatives will not, if his Excellency the Governor has, have any difficulty in deciding as to the course that should be adopted. That the effect of the dispatches received by his Excellency is such is conlirmed by the fact which we now state for the first time, that six hundred of the military were, when the mail left London, under orders to join their respective regiments in New Zealand. These drafts are probably now on their way to this colony, in addition to the detachments of engineers and sappers and miners, whose projected departure has been already notified ; and coupled with the no less important fact, that no instructions whatever have been received recalling the troops, it is proof positive, we should think, not only that they are not to be withdrawn until their mission has been worked out, but that it is the desire of the Imperial Government that the war shall be carried to a satisfactory conclusion—the establishment of a permanent peace."

We are greatly pleased to learn that there is something more than a rrohability of the principal streets being rpcilnrlv watered during the summer. We have often urged that the injury done by dust to t!u> stocks of shopkeepers aivl me:cliairs must in one day very far exeeml thu c >st of watering the streets for a week, to say nothing of th^ inconvenience or even suffering of' those who are compelled to expose themselves to the dense clouds of dast, which u-e know nov? to be the almost invariable attendants of a really hot day. But the Town Board has been unable to gee that it was its duty to incur the expense of providing water-carts, horses, and men; and nothing has been done by the public for their own comfort, apparently for the reason that no one would undertake the trouble ot canvassing for the small subscriptions necessary, or would run the risk of doing the work without having some such guarantee. The intensely dusty days last week have, however, caused a movement. Mr Henry Wilson, contractor, stated to Some friends that he was willing to do the work, without being very exigent on the matter of profit. A subscription list was accordingly started, ami was handed about privately; n. canvasser has since been .employed ; and the list is now in such a state that, by the end of the week Mr Wilson hopes to have some carts at work. There is no stated sum asked from any one, and surely there is no keepsr of any business premises in the centre of the city who cannot give something, and be sure of more than moneys worth in return. If each will give something, we doubt not ttat an efficient water-service will be secured ; for Mr Wilson understands what should be done, he having been, for three years, one of the extractors under the Melbourne corporation, ere the happy days of Van-Yean supply had arrived. Putting aside the question of damage to goods from dust, which is certain and great, it will be worth a shilling or two a week to those who ara not shopkeepers or marchants, ts be able to move about in the glorious sunshine without being at once half stifled and blinded. Mr Wilson proposes to water Princes street from the Octagon to the Imperial Hotol ; Rattray street to the junction with Maclaggan street, iincl at least as far up the latter as the Club House ; High street to the Cutting ; Manse street ; Stafford street to Hope street and Walker street, from the same point downwards.

The funeral of the late Mr James Burns, who was a member of the Volunteer Fire Brigade, took place on Sunday afternoon. The procession was a long and striking one. Abont 50 members of the Brigade were present, some preceding and others following the hearse ; there were numerous private friends or relatives of the deceased ; and the procession wag closed by 30 members of the Police Force, in command of Inspector Morton. The police attended voluntarily, from a desire to show respect for the deceased, and also with a view to testify the cordial goodwill* with which' the two bodies have always acted together when on duty at fires,

Messrs M'Landress, Hepburn and Co., A. G. Fisher and Co., Win. Barnett and Co., E. Do Carle and Co., and Alex, dimming and Co., Auctioneers, have entered into an arrangement to close their places of business every Saturday at one o'clock, in order if possible that their employes may be at liberty to leave at that hour, or certainly not later than three o'clock.

The committee appointed by the Christchurch City Council some time ago to enquire into the desirability of placing a number of swans on the Avon, in order to destroy the pest of the river, watercress, have given in the following report .—Gentlemen—The committee appointed by you to obtain information with a view of ascertaining whether tlie use of swans on the river Avon would pre vent the spread of watoi cress in that river, have So report that the result of their enquiries is decidedly favourable to the use of swans for the purpose. The fact is very clearly proved on the Riccarton estate, where large patches of watercresses have been entirely cleared 'away by two swans only. Ihese swans are not fed ; they are always ou the water, and feed upon watercresses only, which appear to agree remarkably well with them, for they seem to keep in first class condition. Black swans can be obtained from Sydney, and landed in Canterbury, at a cost of about £3 a pair. Your committee would strongly recommend the City Council to import twelve pairs as an experiment ; the risk would not be a Yeiy heavy one, and it would be the means of practically testing the point.

Mr Warden Beetham, writing from Wakatipu under date 29th October, states r— " I have nothing new to mining operations to report this week, beyond a heavy fresh in the river, which has interfered with work for a few days. Business in the Resident Magistrate's Court is decidedly on the increase. An inquest has been held on the body of John Welsh, a miner, who appears to have been' accidentally drowned While climbing a track on the banks of the Shotover. His body was not discovered until gome, weeks after the accident occurred. Population, 1100 miners, and 1000 otherwise engaged."

Mr Warden Hardcastle, writing from the Hogburn, ou the 29th October, observes — " The weather during the week has been fine and the water supply continues unabated' although from the large increase of population it i 3 hardly equal to the demand upon it. Two applications have been made by large parties for three-acre claimß in the bed of the Hogburn gully, below the township of Mount Ida, to work which they propose to construct a tail-race of three miles in length. The township qf Hill's Creek still increases, and is now a large and apparently flourishing place. Dunatan Creek progresses satisfactorily? 1

We understand that on Saturday last, the necessary formal documents from Major Carpi!, in connection with the formation of the proposed cavalry corps of volunteers, were submitrpd to hisll-mnr the Superintendent by th'i Adjutant. Hi* Honor approved of them, and will foe ward them to his -Excellency for ! hi-? sanction. The necessary authority for : r,i>e constitution of the corps may be expected I m about three week*.

In the Insolvency Court, on Monday, duringthe hearing of the petition of Alexander Mackenzie, Hie insolvent explained that he had received ono sum of £20, which he intended to apply to pay his lawyer's expenses for taking him through the Court. His Honor the Jud<, r e expressed surprise that it should take such a large sum to pay the expenses of conducting a case through the Court. Mr Macgregor said the expenses of the Court alone amounted to £5 9s for each petition. Mr Barton complained that the Gazette charges for advertising were something enormous. His Honor said that, although the expenses of the Court were L5 1 9s, and the advertising charges heavy, it ought not to.cost £20 to go through the Court. He did not object to a lawyer getting paid for head-work, but irf the slovenly way in which insolvency business was conducted here under the present Act. there was literally no head work required, especially here where the rule of the schedule was nil, and ha expressed an opinion that the charge was too high.

The " Lyttelton Times " of Saturday, sth November, gives the following account of " an accident which 'occurred on Thursday afternoon about three o'clock in Lyttelton harbor, to a boat belonging to the barque May Queen; she >was in charge of Mr Ray the second officer, and two young men belonging to the crew of the vessel. At the time of the accident, the boat was returning from the ship to the shore with a parcel for the captain • it was blowing strong from the N.W., and about this time, when the boat wa.9 abreast of the Countess of Seafield, the wind was frequently changing to 3N.N.W., ; the, boat was observed from the poop of the Countess of Seafield to go over, which was caused by a strong 'puff filling the sheet at the time they were attempting to go about, and unfortunately when the boat had no way on her, and therefore the rudder was useless. The three persons in charge of the boat got on the.- keel but Mr Ray, finding the boat was sinking' and being a good swimmer, let go his hold to enable the two boys to keep afloat. The carpenter and two others from the 1 Countess of i Seafield immediately put off in one oi their boats to render assistance. Ou Hearing the boys they called out i( Save Mr Bay first we are all right ;" but they were taken into' the boat, and showed how far true their statement was by assisting at the oars to pick' up the second, officer. Not more than four or five minutes elapsed before they reached the body ; it was found with the face downwards, and on being taken into the boat showed no signs of life, although those in the boat tried every means in their power to restore animation. Owing to the strong wind blowing, it took half an hour to bring the body on shore In the first instance they pulled alongside the May Queen, and informed those on board of what had happened, and then started for the shore. The body wa3 taken to the Mitre Hotel, and the doctor of the Blue Jacket was in attendance at once and applied the usual means to restore life Dr Douald came in a short time and assisted Dr Macdonald, but after persevering for half an hour they pronounced the case hopeless. An inquest was held on the body yesterday at the Mitre Hotel, before Wm. Donald Esq coroner for the district ; Mr W. Cummins was chosen foreman of the jury. After hearing the evidence of two or three witnesses the jury returned a verdict of accidentally drowned. Mr Ray was a rising, young man in his profession, and was greatly respected by the captain, officers and crew of the ship."

A meeting of the North Dunedin Crickefc Uub was held on Tuesday at the Albion Hotel. There was a very good attendanceot the old members ; and from the interest manifested, the Club bids fair to become strong and numerous.

The Mowing courageous act by the cook of the Jumna, which recently arrived at Auckland, from London, is reported in the Southern Cross :— On Monday, 3rd October, in 49de<r south latitude, 112deg. 35min. east longitude the ship was sailing at about 3£ knots »er hour, and some of the' passengers, upon hearing a splash is the water, looked over the side of the ship, when they observed a boy floatine astern with his face turned upwards The word was quickly passed through the 'ship, '•A man overboard," and the cook, a native of Boston, named William Maryborough instantly sprang from the ship's side into the water, and in a few moments the drownine lad was seen in the hand? of his deliverer The vessel was immediately brought up to the wind, and the two stern life buoys were cut away, one of which Maryborough succeeded in reaching. The lad, Binden, was then held upon it until assistance, came. The lifeboat from the starboard side was lowered, in charge of the chief officer, and {he man and boy were both picked up at least one and a-half miles- astern of the ship. When brought on board they were much exhausted, and presented almost a deathlike appearance; but the prompt and skilful measures taken by Dr. Snape soon revived them. The boy then stated that" he fell from the fore-yard, and that his fall was cheeked by the lower studding-sail y

Bush ranging still flourishes in New South Wales. The other day, the notorious high" waymen Ben Hall and Gilbert robbedthe Yaw mail, and "fjtuck up" a person near Uoulbourn. Pour persona in the coach were robbed, and the mail bags were rifled?

For some time a singular advertisement has appeared in the Southland papers from a person who lays claim to the whole of the Middle Island, but more especially to those portions of it known as the Wairau Valley and Wairau Plains. The following is from a correspondent of the Marlborough Press :—: — It chanced that a few evenings back, whilst reading the Marlborough Press, my eye caught the heading of a paragraph, entitled, " Alienation of the Middle Island," and thinking that cay friend, under whose red pine my legs were then resting, might enlighten me on the matter, I asked him if his memory could serve him as to a transaction in land that took place about thirty years ago, between a Captain Blinkinsop and the natives. After taking a few puffs of his pipe, and diminishing the quantity of mixed Hollands in his glass, he replied in the affirmative. I was allattentkm, and, with the preliminary clearing of a cobweb, he related to me the following :—: — " In or about the year 1837, Captain BUnkinsop [not Blenkinsop, as I see it spelt in the paper] anchored his vessel in Port Underwood, to try hi 3 luck with the rest amongst tjhe whales, which were then more plentiful on the coast than they are now. Well* all that time we had the native chiefs Rangiata, Raraupura, and Kaikora living here, and a whole host of Maoris who we c the slaves of these chiefs. If I remember clearly, there was some"" fighting going on and Captain Blinkinsop happening to have a 12-pounder carronade on board, Kangiata asked him what he would take for it. A deal was made in dvi form — the chief taking the gun, in exchange for which he transferred to Blinkinsop all the land as far as he could see, comprising the district from Cloudy Bay to what is now called the Top House. After the whaling season was over Blinkinsop cleared out, and we heard nothing more of the affair until the barque Hope landed here, in 1840, four men with their wives and families, having with them bullocks, ploughs' and other necessaries to settle on the land. It appears that after B inkinsop died, his wite trans ferredw hatever right and title she had to the Wairau Valley to aMr Unwin, a lawyer in Sydney, and it was by him the Hope was sent to Cloudy Bay. Some time after Blinkinsop's departure, Rangiata, considering that he had done a foolish thing in giving up the land for a gun he could not make use of, repudiated the transaction, and carried the gun to Gard's Bay, where it lies to this day. The men sent over by Unwin had built themselves whares, and liftd Bet to work clearing tne land ; however, they were iv continual dread of the natives, who disputed their right to possession. Well, j one day the four men were missing.and the natives gave it out that they were drowned by the upsetting of their boat ; but the settlers in Port Underwood had evidence that they were murdered, and .more than one is now living, descended from these very men, who can tell the same tale. This is all I know about it -, but if I may hazard an opinion as to j the chances the man has who is advertising for his property in the Now Zealand papers, of getting it out of the hands { who now hold the runs and farms on the J Wairau, they ate as good as those I have of being made the Emperor of Rooshia." — Press, 19th October. . j

The Canterbury " Press," alluding to the Congregational Chapul lately erected at Christchurch, says i — " This building, which ■was designed by Messrs Farr and Cuff, and is situated at the corner of Manchester and .Worcester streets, is expected to be completed in •abouMen days time. Its construction has been rapidly carried on, the work having only been in the hands of the contractors, Messrs. Hemingway and Co, for about fifteen weeks The dimensions of the structure are as fol lows : Length inside, 60 feet ; breadth, 30 feet ; height to the eaves, 15 feet. The walls are built of 18-inch rubble, from the Halswell quarry. The two pilasters at the front, to gether with the cornices over the gables at the front and back, are ornamented with the white tufa stone from Governor's Bay, the caps to the side buttresses, and the ornamental work of both porches being of the same stone. The gables and side buttresses arc pointed with white putty. The roof is supported by iron girders, the heads and shoes being of cast, and the bars wrought iron, and is slated. The inside of the roof is boarded with American pine, the rafters being of New Zealand wood— totara and black pine. The flooring is also laid down with tongued and grooved American pine boards. A lean-to vestry has also been ouilt of rubble ornamented with tufa stone. The net contract price is, ■we hear, only Ll 150."

A special meeting of the Town Board was held on Monday afternoon at four o'clock, for the purpose of making arrangements for the Board to attend the funeral of the late Mr ] John M'Giashan, Mr M'Leod was in the chair, and introduced the business by stating that it was desirable the Town Board, as a public body, should attend the funeral. The lately arrived members of the Board were not aware ot the disinterested services which had been rendered to the Province at large by Mr M'Glashan. No public man had contributed more than he to the prosperity of Otago, and to the development of its resources, and all these services had been given in a most straightforward and disinterested manner. He therefore thought it would be a grateful tribute to his memory if the Board were, in their public capacity, to follow his remains to their last restingplace. MrM'Guiremoved,and Mr Grey seconded, a resolution to the effect — " That the Town Board attend the funeral of the late Mr John M'Glashan on Tuesday aad for that purpose that they meet at the oifices in Princes street, not later than a quarter to three o'clock in the afternoon." The resolution was carried, and the details of the necessary arrangements occupied the remaining time of the meeting.

We clip the following from the Southern Cross i — " Amongst the articles prepared for exhibition at the New Zealand Industrial Exhibition is it bookcase to be contributed by Mr Edward King. We have since had an opportunity of seeing the piece of furniture, which may properly be described as a library bookcase and cheffonier, and it is certainly one of the most beautiful pieces of cabinetwork we have seen made in New Zealand. Mr John Mason, ornamental cabinetmaker, is the manufacturer, and those who have seen the inlaid table made by him which was sent home to the London Exhibition will be fully aware of his ability in this respect. The face of the chefftnier is beautifully inlaid, and panelled with very many different kinds of wood, compiising kauri, totara, rimu, mottled kauri, and root of kauri, which latter takes a beautiful polish. The value of the work is about £70, and and it will be one of the best, if not the best piece of cabinet-work forwarded to the Exhibition from Auckland."

The " Southern Cross " of the 24th ult., says :—": — " We are glad to announce that the Crown agents have sold one million of the three million loan, at a price equivalent to a six per cent loan at par. The disastrous news of the Gate* pah repulse, coupled with the high price of money in the English market, rendered it necessary to negotiate one million of the unguaranteed portion at a sacrifice ; but all things considered, there is not so much reason to complain. The enemies of the colony, who were so loud in their notes of triumph that the loan was a failure, must now lower their key a little. They may perceive that there will not be the financial embarrassments which they predicted, for not only is the Government in a position to meet all its liabilities, but it will have a balance of about £400,000 to the credit of the colony besides. The Ministry will be able to meet the Assembly in a good financial position, to the chagrin of the '" croakers," who must feel very much disappointed. When the Assembly meets, and the Governor has been forced to give effect to the confiscation policy, as sanctioned by the Imperial authorities, or to resign, the colony will bo in a flourishing condition. The waste lands of the rebels must be used to defray the cost of the war, whatever the pro-Maori party; with the Governor at its head, may say to the contrary ; and the fund, which will be available from this source, added to the moiety ef the loan already realised, will be ample to give effect to the policy sanctioned by the Assembly, and inaugurated by Sir George Grey. We look to the Assembly to be firm on this point. The Governor has endeavored to trample upon the Constitution, ha 9 even sought to ruin the Colony, that he might stand well with Exeter Hall, but whatever view the Legislature may take of Ministers, conduct, one thing is certain, the Governor will not find the General Assembly of New Zealand willing tools in his hands, or instruments of their own degredation."

The Timam Herald reports a case of suicide at Waimate, of which the following are the particulars :— Sinca writing the above, Waimate has been the scene of a very melancholy event. A poor c-ld mm, named Drake, who has lived here for the last twelve months, earning a livelihood by doing light work in the bush, committed suicide on Monday last by cutting his throat. The deceased was one who had evidently seen better days, and was of a very quiet anri reserved disposition. Some two or three months since, his mind became affected, and his behavior so strange that it was deemed necessary to send him to Tnnaru. he could not rest there, and as it was supposed he had become sane, he was allowed to return . Last week his manner was observed to be altered, and his mind evidently again unsettled. He complained of being haunted by devils, who were continually telling him that he should not enter the Kingdom of Heaven. The poor fellow was living in a hut alone on the edge of the bush ; on Monday morning, instead of going to the bush as was his custom, he remained indoors, and was seen and was spoken to by several persons who passed by — by none of whom was anything particular in his manner observed. One neighbor spoke to him but ten minutes before the alarm was raised, about half-past nine, by a man who saw him standing in a large pool of blood at his door, with his throat cut in a mest frightful manner.

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Bibliographic details

News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 676, 12 November 1864

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News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 676, 12 November 1864

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