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LONDON.

(PROM THE DAILY TIMES CORRESPONDENT.)

May 26th, 1804.

The German Powers evidently joined the Conference with a predetermination to elude »U terms and conditions ; every obstacle was thrown in the way of peaceful measures ; and their decided refusal to diMJuss au armistice brought ua to a dead lock at the departure of last mail. Fredericia was to be the scene of the next tragedy, and Copenhagen was agitated by the doubtful policy of the Government. Conference, however, wa9 resumed on the 4th inst., when Germany, more buuiptuous than ever, offered most degrading terms; but Denma-k scorned an armistice on Prussia's humiliating conditions, which were that the Anstro- Prussian troops should occupy the conquered territory, whilst Denmark was to retire from Alseu, raise the blockade of German ports, restore the captured ships with indemnity to their owners, and pay all expenses of the war — meantime, daughter and s; oliation continued till the Danes seeing the hopelessness of contending singlehanded against such fearful odJs, and being deserted by Europe, retired from Fredeiicia, and the impoverished province of Jutland was overrun by military locusts. On the 9th inst., Conference wiet again, when a suspension of arms was agreed on for one month, commencing the 12th inst., both parties to retain their positions. Denmark to raise tbe blockade, and not another gun to be fired till further notice. It i 3 not wise to expect too much from this cessation of hostilities, for Danish obstinacy and German rapacity are difSonlt things to deal wi'h. Conference has uince met but without effecting .■ anything: farther, and it now stands adjourne'l till the 28th inst.. we are at all events relieved from the perils of the hour ; European coufia(if io mu4 occur) is postponed ; and thirty-one days may work some radical change ii continental Cabinets. Prussia may deem it prudent to think less of her shabby glory at Duppel, and give thoughts to that universal opprobrium eht baa acquired by her barbarous policy of the last three months. Austria may reflect on her false position in participating in this great wrong in order to rival Prussia in Fatherland, and both 1 Powers may find time to study the important question, what will be their own fate in the hour [ of cUnger, with "no friend or brother nigh"— I whilst Denmark will look at her helpless posi- j I tion, make the best of a bad bargain, reform her I institutions, do justice to all classes of her subI jeds-, and by avoiding any cause of aggression I from such dangerous customers justly lay claim Ito protection. At Copenhagen a strong feeling I prevails for continuing the war, whilst the King I and his Ministers, at the risk of their popularity I caa only Buggest (in the absence of foreign aid) I three alternatives, viz., annexation to Sweden, a I Russian protectorate, or uuion with the German I Confederation — that they biturly complain of I English desertion is only natural, for they had B etery reason to expect good help from us. ■ The King of Prussia is literally Irewildered by ■ his great success, five men to one; he dubs himself ■a mighty conqueror, struts about preceded by j ■ dancing flower girls, andindulgesinallsortsofvain ■boasting and torn-foolery, quite blind to the i-ievi-■tableconsequencfsof a persistence in his marauding ■propensities ; whilst Bismarck joyfuLy seconds his ■master, hoping to divert the nation's thoughts ■from domestic grievances and his own disgrace ; ■but, apart from thi«, the whole conduct of King Hwilli»m and his minister throughout the busi■ness has been infamous, and it is no secret that ■annexation of the Duchies to Prussia was their ■object; they declare that the treaties cf 1852 are Restroyed by the events of the war, and they ar* ■even now propo-ing a canal to connect the North' ■Sea with tbe Baltic : whilst tbe thievish exploits Bpf their bold F. M. Yon Wrangel, and his inHraman treatment of the poor Jutlanders has beaa Hrewarde.l at Berlin by high promotion in the Beerage; he is certainly old enough to know betUtr, and yet descends to tbe worst excesses of war, Hbr although a suspension of arms is agreed on, Hhe destruction of Danish works is continued by Hhe Prussians, forced labor is exacted from 2000 Hf the peasantry, heavy war contributions are under threats oi sack and pillage, fib ops an<i Bfenrehou»eß are ransacked, towns and villages waste, and Danish citizens imprisoned for BBon-paymeot of that which is beyond their power Hi fact, all sense of chivalry has departed, and ■Be live to see European warfare a mere brigan ■ftge on the most extensive scale ; the extinction ■f Denmark being apparently decreed under the ■Billing tfinnipionsbip of Prussia. |H^Phe question of peace or war is a difficult one, ■lad the prospect no way bright—the Danes get a ot hostilities, which is a purely negaBBve concession, and commits them to nothing. |Brns?ia, without the slightest legal footing in ■Henmark. actually occupies ihe mainland, and ■HKms prepared for selfish purposes to blot the ■Btte kingdom from the map without further ■Burning. Germany divided against itself is full ■JH Jealousy, fear, aggress-ion, and auarchy — ■■nope looks on, tenders advices, and expects jHfclytobe asked foi active interference. Italy Hnd other volranic regions show smouldering ■Bhes likely to blaze forth at any hoar, whilst tfoi ■jßjincipalitieß are crowded with combustibles in ■He shape of 60,"0O Russians ab the Danube's BBmth, and 30,000 Auatrians on the Servian fron■nf, together with 150,003 Turkish soldiers formJHrthe army of Rouiuelia; the fortresses on the HKck Sea and Dardanelles being at the same He most carefully attended to. Surely all this ■■gloomy enough, and nothing but a peaceful HHfmination to the Conference can reassure us ■ ■S yet what <?an we expect when next it m«-ets ? ■Jp rnmoured that Prussia will insist on tearing HB Duchies from Denmark and endeavor to Hjßropriate them -that the Diet is determined ■■ having them in the Bund, and will oppose ■wssian interference -that Austria, wibh scarcely HHoice in i he matter, will agree to nothing til) ■Bean join the strongest party—that France will HJlplay the waiting game, and whilst ail are at HJBkerheaiig, propose a plebiscite, because univerHBHuffrage being the Tuilleries motto the people ■Hschleswig-Holstein mu«t be allowed to choose HHJthemselves— that Russia will let them all do HJBhey like so long as her reversionary interests ■■Knot compromised— that Denmark will be ■■Eousto get cut of the scrape ou the beat terms ■■■inabie, and that England will try to save the ■■Ktry of our Alexandra from extinction. Now, HHRugh thia dense fog it is not easy to steer; ■■Ja recent cry from Copenhagen says, "DenHp Jot the Danes, aad the Danes for Den■Hk. They want what aever before existed,

and the absence of which lias led to the present war, ti'z, a line of demarcation separating tfie one nation from the other, and beyond which Germany shall not step —they are reported now to see the folly of craving after German territory or German subjects, for it ha 3 cost them dearly, and they wish no further truck with their treacherous neighbors ; but without this frontier line they can never be safe.

K. HI. is silent as the grave on the present momentous position of Europe, and yet one single word of bis would make Germany pause; how long he will remain passive is the question of the day ; what his secret thoughts and ultimate intentions are it would be useless tr> discuss— bold man as he is, he scarcely dare allow the annihilation of Denmark, but should he permit this, it may be only to inflict on Germany such a chastisement as the world may approve of, and at a time when no natiou will venture or feel inclined to say a word on behalf of the blood-stained Robbers of the Rhine. The French eagle watches the game closely, no doubt, and at the proper moment will swoop on the prey ; wje then unto Germany if King William's cheap glory, self-laudation, and imbecility, with Austrian connivance, induce a continuance of this needless and astgre^sive war beyond even English patience ; for the time must shortly come when France and Knglaud will stand befote tbe world fully excused for opposing force, and much as Denmark now suffers, she will be fearfully avenged. But there is plenty of room to hope for a peaceable solution ; Germany has acquired glory and renown, and has indulged in veneeance and spoliation enough, one would think, to satiny any stupid King , _ and bucaneering FieldMarshal; aad if the representative of the .Diet will join ue, as to the future of the Duchies all may be we'll. As yet England hesitates to strike, relying on remonstrance, ani joining France in demanding this delay of a month ; and should Prussia and Austria break up the Conference and renew hostilities, there is little doubt that France will likewise join us in denouncing such conduct as a crime, and au outrage on the general feeling of Europe. A. startling incident occurred in connection with this war. Austria beiug n-ttled at Pruesia monopolising all the glory on terra Jirma, resolve i to try luck on the ocean, and presently her equadron anchored in the Downs j our fleet was then t-ignalled, and soon got alongside, when, on beipg questioned, the Am rians said their only intention was to protect- commerce. Suddeuly they disappeared, and the Aurora being sent after them, was just in time to witness Gernunv's first fight at s^a. Off Heligoland two Dani3ti frigates and one corvette encountered two Austrian frkates and three gunboats. The fight lasted four hoars and victory declared for Denmark. This happened on the 9fcli inst., the very day that a suspension of arms was agreed to in Conference, and the electric wire soon broucht the news ; in the eveninjr it was alluded to in Parliament, and when Sir Geo. Grey aunounced that the Danish fleet had, against odds, beaten the Austrians in a fair stand-up fight, it was as if another shannon and Chesapeake had come off, there was 9uch shouting and cheering and clapping of hands as not only expressed the sentiments of the British House of Commons, but it Was echoed throughout (England, The Austrians are admitted, in their essay v. ith an embryo German navy, to have bandied their ships right gallantly; but although we give them fiis praise, and in their trouble allowed them the shelter of British waters, they bave not yet forgiven us our rejoicings at their defeat.

In Amerifa all is confusion worse confounded, Members brave the indignation of Congress by expressing entire dissent from continuance of the war, and by proposing Southern independence. Then a Bi'l is introduced for totil abolition of slavery. The people are threatened with i-nmediate taxation of 400 millions. Mr Chase has exhausted all his Greenback dodgery 50 per cent, ia taxed on all goods Imported The Empire State is involved to the extent of twothirds of all the propetty contained in it. Profuse and extra.vflg.mt expenditure prevails amongst all the prosperous classes of the New ngland States, and Broadway stnres in amazement at itself, and disregards the ruinous demand for gold. Hieh prices and low wages cause fearful destitution, and 15,000 artizaus are on strike in New York, asking very awkward questions. Gold oscillates between 70 and 80 per cent premium. Soldiers are worth their weight in the precious metal- blacks and whites bcin? paid alik.3. and rewarded wi'h confiscated rebel property. Corruption fl <urishes, whilst honest trade i 9 languishing - there is failure, and dishonesty in all the chief offices of War, Navy, Treasury, and State. Grant obtains "ninety days" for the capture of Richmond by a threefold attack, whilst warriors are so scarce that even L9O bounty can scarcely buy sufficient " food for powder" to satisfy the demand, and anj thing like a compulsory draft would cause re?olution ia N<»w York.

I j the field, the Federal lossps have lately been very great ; and they hare suffered Bevero reverses ia Tennessee, North Carolina, and Louisiana. No quarter seems to be the order of the day, fur on the capture of Fort Pillow by Confederate General Forrest, out of a garrison of 600 but few escaped with life ; prisoners were not wanted, the victims were shot in cold blood, hospitals burnt with their wounded, and several p'or creatures actually buried alive. But all attention is now riveted on Grant and ihe Potomac army, for truly there are difficulties of appalling magnitude surrounding Lincoln's administration ; there is failure in the field— panic on the Exchange— con fusion in the cabinet -ib is all breakdown and collapse. The Uuion seems fast falling to pieces and scarcely needs the shock of arms to break it, up. The last hopes of the North are on Grant and his troops ; nothing but deci.-ive victory can retard the hour of ruin. It almost appears as if both. North and South are about to try their last throw, for never was a campaign undertaken on more gigautic proportions. Tnat Grant is fall of energy, talent, bravery, and resolution, is generally admitted. He has unlimited and unfettered eoutrol of every movement connected with hi 9 all important and responsible commanil. He snys he will march to Richmond, and his friends believe him and trust in him. But there is another tale to be told the late villainous attempt of Kirkpatrick and Dahlgren on the doomed city cannot be forgotten. There ia a wholesome objection to the Washington programme of Back and pillage, and that inhuman carnival of, lust and crime which is to follow Northern succe.B; consequently we must expect that old Gen. Lee is well prepared for this invasion—indeed, it is reported that Richmond is unapproachable; that it is punrded by snch formidable lines as rival those of Torres Vedras ; and that the invading host will be so cut up long before reaching the fatal trap—that they will be

surrounded far away from reinforcement or succour of any kind ;* such are the different versions of North and South respecting this death struggle. Should the Confederates succeed, it will win their independence, for no future army of th« Potomac will ever be tolerated ; and should Ulysses Grant reach the coveted goal with anything like an effective army, he will achieve a miracle, and save his patrons from an ignominious fate. But that the fall of Richmond will end tbe war is by no means certain. The allied fleets of England, France and Italy are being strengthened ' to protect the Hey of Tunis and give security to foreiunew. We don't quite understand this ißsun-ection, for simultaneously with it we rend of the Province of Oran in French Algeria being in fl-unes and revolt, and 50,000 dusky sous of the Desert in this improved age are found in arms against their " civilizers ;" but large reinfot cements were dispatched, and as Pelissier is with them, a few more cave bon fires will probably suffice to smother the rebellion. Without better particulars it might be rash to call this a "revolt of Islam/ but ihe Tribes which have rKen iv Tunis and Algeria are of the same Desert-breed, and should this real.y be an Islamite movement, another great battle of races may yet be f>nght for the tenet 3of the prophet, and once more the Cross and the Crescent may have to contend for supremacy. Thiers and Berryer have again been giving the Kinperor a bit of their minds ; they reemmend peace as French salvation, and 250.000 men as tbe maximum standing army. Now as times go this is but a small force tor the i( Arbiter of Europe;" and as it is the pleasure of Mr Bonaparte to keep us in the dark respecting the mission of France according to Imperial notions, we can only truss that the saga-ious gentleman is alive to the danger of an expenditure growing year by year, deficit following deficit, a debt increasing at compound interest, and exDedieuts after expedients resorted to till nearly' all are exhausted— these are facts which may well make him pause in his present career and leid to wholesome refl actions.

Captain Speke, after encountering the "cold shoul.ler" at home, has taken to lecturing in France ; he has had more than one audience at the Tuileries, and is said to have so far captivated the Emperor and wife with glowing accounts of sunny travel and future prospects that Bonaparte declared his readiness to join with England in developing the resources of Equatorial Africa. Pio Nono still lingers, but wns strong enough on the 3rd instant to fulminate Papa 1 , wrath against Rus3iau birbarity in Catho'ic Poland : it may be that Mouravieft and De tterg are indifferent to hard words from the Vatican, howe-rer much the Czar should disapprove of being bullied. The Kingdom of Italy was at the same time excommunicated lor laying sacreligiom hands on one Cardinal Moricbini who put aside his holy guise and dabbled in treason at Turin ; bub the reverend gentleman ha* since been acquitted aad Italy is saved from perdition. His Holiness is also yet alive to the bo- lowing fashion, and another two million sterling is addei to the State dabt Peter's pence Is a fluctuating income yielding about £300,000 annually, and there are hundreds of origands to be maintained who cobt a heap of money ; on this infamy the outcry is louder than ever, and the question is what to do with them. While the ola Pope lives they are safe enough, but tluit seourity removed their fate is certain ; the idea \* to remove them from Italy at once, the difficulty is to find an asylum - failing all other schemes why not ship them off to America ?— au Italian brigade might be usefully employed, and if they fell gloriously on eiiher Bide the Potomac what loss would it be to society 1 But good old Pio is game to tbe backbone ; up to (he latest hour we shall hear his eloquent maledictions against heresy ; his saving benediction for erring humanity, and his earnest appeal to all good Catholics for the loan of a few million scudi at fair interest.

An intelligent traveller from Poland writes — "the overwhelming Eussian force tells fearfully ob the revolutionary bands ; the ' fur land of Poland ' 18 a desert, her people in exile, prison, or the grave : yet the flame flickers and fully ocoupkatwomrrcile's Russian commander?, who at length quarrel with each other on th* different mode 1 ' of torture and oppression— strong forces of well armed insurgents are still to the front, protected by hilla and forests, and the movement may be kept up for months— the unhappy Pules no longer expect, aid, and they preier to die in arms t>ie soldier's death to wasting away painfully in ohains; annihilation before submission." Such i* the melancholy statement of one who would only be too happy to draw a brighter picture ; the end of the iiismal tragedy is approaching, and Poland will soon be no more.

Cirenssia likewise falls at last into the hug of Petersburg; and after mauy yea-B of heroism 300 000 mountaineers are driven from their homes, and fly as one man from their hat e d oppressors to «eek refuge at the Ottotnai Porte. The sufferings attenaant on th's hurried exodus are described as something awful, reviring the notorious horrors of the Middle Passage ; and in their frenzied flight men, women, and children, aredyine: by thousands, but those who c urvive are most hospitably received by orders of the Sultan ; and thus, whilst Russia acquires a fine military position both for attack and defence, Turkey secures _a large increase of population, which by an infusion of new blood iray arrest her decline ; at all events her vast fertile plains have a chance ot cultivation, and her army will be recruited by those valiant mountain warriors who will play no mean part in the next attempts from Peters-bu<-g on the coveted " Sick man's" possessions. The Cape de Verde Islands are suffering fearfully from famine ; by hst accounts the Inland-, were reported to be destitute alike of provi-ions and money, and without some speedy relief it was feared two thirds of the inhabitants must perish.

India seem-! tolerably free from excitemen fc. The Persian Gulph telegraph has been completed. Some month* ago Mr Eden and three other gentlemen with 200 attendants started on an exploration from Calcutta across the wild Himalayan range to Buootan, a dependency of Thibet, with the view to discover a N.K. passage to China, although (a-3 in the case of the Polar Seas) a passage, if existing, would" be commerc ally useless ; but these are tasks which suit our adventurous spirits, and can always find a hero. Instead of perishing- in tbe snow, as the \»hole party expected, Mr E Jen actually readied his destination, but only to be insulted by the Chiefs, imprisoned, and compelled to sign a treaty ceding British Assam to Bhootan. Now, whatever be tho worth ot thia nefarious treaty, we shall never be foolhardy enough to march an army across that stupendous chain of desolation to cha9tue the presumptuous chieft&ins who dictated such insolent terms to a British Envoy ; and with the terrible fata of Sir John Franklin before us,

we must hear no more of such, madcap wanderings.

In Obina horrors Deign supreme; EuropeOßSfight as raercenaries oa either side, and participate, consequently, in revolting barbarism whicb> no argument on commercial policy can justify. The rebels receutly captured the steam boatFire Ply, <luring the night as she rode nt anchor in the harbor ; on board wsre four European oflieenrwho were overpowered, hound hand and foot, and actualiy burnt alive, Major Gordon (ma again taken service aud i-> slaughtering the Taeprogßmost handsomely ; he describes the destitution aHreally frightful in districts through which he passed^and states that dried human flesh wasbeing publicly offered for sale. Later acconnia say that Gordon has beeia seriously wounded, andthe Imperialists defeated. Lord Palinerston says,, it is the intention of Government to discourage for the future any interference in Chine-e affairs, . except where it is necessary for protecting the treaty ports. In Japan the position of Foreigners is still a serious question ; the system of personal rodestation appears to ue abandoned, but intimidation respecting commerce is openly practised, Colonel Neale U hard at work on this grievance, and an abatement is expected. At all events, our efforts at - regeneration are not entirely useless, for, although the Tycoon and nobles have removed from Teddo to a safe distance from foreign contact, we Jeans that when two Bri'ish s>hips were lately wrecked on the coast, their crews were kindly treated by the natives, which is a great improvement on.-, former transactions in similar cases, and of iteelf speaks volumes for humanity. We are embioiled in an unwholesome business on the Gold Coast ; the cruel Ashantees having some time since declared war against the friendlj tribes around our settlement, and we unfortunately interfered. For many months we fought ngainst the elimata only (for un Aahantee warrior has never yet been seen), and now fr*?sb troops are required ; but such sickening accounts ofdisease aud death have lately reached us from that pestilential region as to bang forth parliamentary inquiry. It now turna out fh.it ior 18months nave we been engaged in this horrid wax, , with the intention of storming the capital called Coomassie, 150 miles from Oape Coast Ca3tle ;„ and as yet have only got halfway, where we »re encamped in the Bush —a dismal swamp, which our officers only reach to die. But the tale is too - shocking to be toll, the expedition too deteataWe to be endured, and Mr Cardwell has wisely promised its discontinuanae.

We likewise hear from the same quarter, tbst - his sav.itre M>jesty of Dahomey has ju«t been playing at soldiers ; at the head of 10,000 troopshe valiantly lea the way to the gates of tieenemy. But the Hgbas gave him such a warm . reception as induced the royal reaolve "to live, aad fight another day," in preference to the glory ■ of beiug there and then in the battle alain ; and even as he was the first to march so was he the first to "turn and flee," content that two otrthree thousand of his devote 1 Amazons should t spill their plebeian blood in the noble bat -sauteffort to uphold Dahomian supremacy. A black bishopric has been created— Samuel ■ Crowther vie Affjai, Bishop of the Niger, was - formerly a slave and native of Dahomey. After many vicissitudes, he was lucky enough to be • captured by a British man-of-war, and landed at . dierra Leone iv 1*22. There he fell in love, andstudied theo.ogy, married a native, and made himself famous. He .completed his classics in England, was ordained by th« Bishop of London* introduced to fhe Qieen, and is now a maD of lawn and learning. Surely, this is a step in tberight direction ; and the benevolent missionarysociety will thus receive vast heb in their praiseworthy exertion* to promot-i Christianity. It is cheering in this sea-girt Me to know that . we have a Cnannel fleet which still rivets theattention, and commands the decent repeci of " all nations. Our "olil Salts" will no longer • shake their venerable nobs, nor tuin their disconsolate quids on ths supposed decline of OM England on the ocean ; for, whilst they remember - how Nelson, with his wooden walls at Trafalgar,,, saved the c -untry from fierce Boney's promised visitation, they will have seen lately how the eyes . of Europe were fixed on the slightest movement of Admiral Dacres, when "all in the Downsthe fleet lay moored." Even as the "SancyArethußa" fliunted the Union Jack in the face of every foe, so did our more terrible new fangledfr iron giants ride at anchor, held like sea-hounds-in the leasb, a warning to Germany and othez - bier hullles that there ia a limit to the proverbial patience of gentle John Bull, and more than one rod in pi-'kie for evil doers.

The voice of England being so loudly proclaimed in favor of litile Denmark, without; • material aid being afforded, has placed the Ministry in a very luzjrdous position. 'he Tories were ready to storm the Treasury bpnch and fight the (ierraans, and had not a suspension ©£- hostilities been procured, the Opposition would ha^-e availed themaplvfs of public indignation ; - the reassembling of Conference is therefore looked forward to most anxiously. Poor little Johnny • haa had to beir the brunt of the people's wrath,.. although it might be easily se-n that he and Pbna are anxious to stop Teutonia's m>id career, ami* would long ago have clone so had they been permitted. The Continental gentlemen believe that" whilst the Queen can prevent it we shall not rosert to arms, but they may yet presume too far ;• and should the tlireateningclouds which now horar ■ o'er devoted Europe culminate in a storm, England will be found r<«ady and able to take her own part, s without much doubt. as to the result. But how " it inuy be with our distant friends and relations ■ is a very grave question, that is our vulnerablepoint and the only cause we have to fear ; &r were we at war with any gr. at powpr, it would be utterly impossible io protect the Colonies from' the serious dauger of hostile cruisers ; and unless -< shore batte-ies are ready to guard Colonial ports and harbors, the worst that could happeu is to beapprehen'.'eJ.

Oti the 2nd iust. the Bank of England raked' the rate of discount from 7to 8 per cent. On. •. the sth it was 9 per cent, and consols dropped to90 ; and although this led to no alteration in the' '•ate of interest on deposits with Joint Stocfc: bank*, it looked very much like war Mid caused no slight alarm, ilut it may have the effect of checking the present wild r"ge for speculationat home, and iadace pugnacious Continentals to pause ; and as nearly all nations are on the 1 borrowing tack, a seasonable hint from Threadneedle street may not perhaps be entirely thrown » away.

The Mersey steam rams will soon engage tbea'tention of the Court of Kxchequer: "Th* Queen against Laird and Others" is fixed for~ June 7, to allow time for the reputed Frern&. contractor to appear, and also for the return to a. Commission which has been Bent to JRgvpi; *©„ examine the Viceroy touching a bond fide pn«>~

cErsse for his Highness ; and we shall soon know more as lo the respectability , the ownership, and destination of thos<? very troublesome ladiea, " El Toussin," and » El Modou." The Garibaldi fever at length ha* paved away; msA perhaps, after all, it was kind of Bjnaparte and our Ministers to put a stopper on it, for Sftazzini and Co. were buzzing about the hero, looked awkward ; but then it. W.ik done so abruptly— we were so suddenly cheeked m the midst our sport, that the ppople "didn't seem to like it," so we spluttered out our gram■Wingr. had a round or two with the police, bullied • the Government and Louis Na; oleon, and then Tewmed our neglected Shakrpeare. The General-, last few hours on British soil were passed with Ilk old frimd Colonel Peard. bitter known as "Garibaldi's Fjog)i-bms.n,'' ;u Cornwall; but in reaching that asylum, another series of e r thusi•sstic greeting was in store, and tbrtuurhout the West of England ail did homage to our departing gaest. The dreadful shaking of hands was revived in full force ; and had it not been one of a thousand, that "good light arm must have been wrecchpd from the socket. Rtentuallv, however, he was simgly berthed in Sutherland's yncht, and on the 9th instant, safely arrived at iris island home. Subscriptions were coming in apace 1 and* had he been *o minded, the poor Italian would have become an Enelish millionaire; but be "would Done of it"— He positively declined to accept any money gifts, so the funds are returned to the donors, and some other means will be adopted to bestow on him a substantial proof of our esteem. The ovation lie received here was heyond all prec dent, and the perturbation of despotism was extreme ; to judge from the foreitrn press, a sensation of relief was experienced on hearin* that the General had left us. Suspicion then followed thes earner, and cruizera were on the watch, for it wai booked as a certainty that Garibaldi, the Duke of Sutherland, and .Karl Sefton, were to land in Naples with all the appliances of revolution, and Italy was again to be in flames. JVodou'it Napoleon ba« donp wonders for that land, and may do more yet if the Italians will but wait a little longer; for, in his generous moments, the Bmperor pro-fjo-es to give some Danubian nlchiug; to Austria In exchange for Venetia ; also to reWse the Pope from temporal cares, and thus mnke Eoiue the capital Anyway, Garibaldi goes hack to his farm and hi* goats a mu<*h greater man than he ever wis before; and, if the " party of action" will refrain awhile from urging the bright patriot into iil-timed adventure?, the hour will surely come when the pood red shirt shall be Italy's guide to freedom and greatness. Alarming disturbances are reported at Edinburgh, in connection w'tb. what i* termed " Mi sister's money." The people objact to pay the ' tax, seizures are made, and rioters assemble by • thousands. Hitherto, the police and military bave prevented anyti.ing serious but there i« sufficient danger in such asn>m Wages to c.»!l for a speedy and satisfactory adjustment of tbe obnoxious impost The 73rd Anniverssrv of the Royal Literary ■Fund wo* held at t*t. James's Hall on the 18th inst,, the Prince of Wales presiding:, and, as this washi^ first appearance iv the character of cliairoraau. much interest was r xcite.l. It was a perfect success : he gave forth toast?, and responded to others ; ho drank everybody's health, wid did sliort speeches m such a bu ines* like manner as must make him famous in that line, and piocure hi 3 Royal Highness more eiiEnsremcnb than may be quite ngreeab'e with his other public duties. ' The fair Alexandra has had to do the Qufen's duty at St. James's— poo- thing ! Diplomacy •■wras there in strong force, and we dare not nsk what may have been the Princess's feelings when the representatives of cruel Germany were presented to kiss hands—the Prioce of Wales -was by her side, and a<? a Field Marslnl of Eng- • land, mu«t have had his thoughts on the outraged country of his bride, and the perpetrators of tho^e outnures— truly tbe cares of pomp and state are no joke under such trying circumstances. Her 1 Majesty sufficiently recovered from her severe attack of neuralgia to hold a Royal Court at Buckingham Palace, on the 10th inst., and then retired to Balmoral. Prince Alfred, while on his -travels called to ?ee his sister at Berlin, and was decorated with the ''rder of the Click Eagle, and our press don't approve of this ; it is considered a very questionable honor jiut now; aud old . Punch saya that if it were cot for offending Koyal Mamma, the sailor Prince would have been justified in reciprocating with the order of the Black jeye—Bnyhow this visit was ill judged, and taken in conjunction with the exclusive reception «f the German Plenipotentiaries at Osborne and Windsor, calls forth observations in the papers on tue_ Queen's decided sympathy with Germany against Denmark, as opposed fcj the general feeling of the English nation. Her Majesty's 46th 'birth day was celebrated on tbe 24th inst. The royal family are all well; the young Prince Albert Victor of Wales being reported firat- - class.

Shakespeare's festival is ended, and everybody ;iagladofit; from the beginning it was badly managed, and showed no redeeming feature throughout its continuance; at Stratford, in spite of the blare of peany trumpets and the blaze at frzzinz fireworks, the committesmen barely - Cleared expenses ; and the profession have themselves alone to thank for such a deplorable failure— but time works wonder?-, and some hun- - dred yearn hence history may tell the sad tale of 1864, and show how easily success might have been nchieved. One good thing, however, is f.lifeely to result, and that is the Dramatic College : it is to be named after the Bard, and if patronised - as we expect, it will afford superior education at a reasonable figure for the children of actors and ■ tradesmen.

Giacomo Meyerbeer died on the 2nd instant, at Paris, aged 70, and leaves behind him a name - oecond to none on the iyric stage. One of a numerous family celebrated in literature, science, and art, Giacomo's public career has been 1 lengthy •at 7 years old a public pianist ; at ten an author; afterwards a fellow pupil with Weber under the Abbe Vogler. Although so aged the composer's powers showed no symptoms of decay, for be had just competed his last -ODera, "L' African*," the performance of which poly awaitfd the arrival of a fitting soprano. It is remarkable that previous to his death Meyereeer slast visitor was the veteran Hossini: also, -that ; the departed genius died worth half a million sterling. _ Frank Smedley, the author, died on the Ist instant, aged 50. Hercules Hobinson, a middy in the Euryalus, « T , r 2 fal K ar » died a British Admiral, ag^d 75, on ttiel&th instant, a prime specimen of an Old « T as braye ' he woa all hearts, and to.rasb.ed the enemy ; he couU spin a yarn too, and write a book— lew men die more regretted. Abraham Cann, of Devonshire, the champion

English wrestler, has just died at 70 Porty years ago he defeated Polkinghorn, the Gormshman, iv a match which excited national interest.

I had but time last mail to announce that the Two Thousand was won by Lord Glasgow's General Peel, an event which raised him to the premiership for the Derby. The Chester Cup came off 4th instant, when all the favourites were beaten, and th* prize was captured by Mr Hughes' Fla-b-in-the-Pan. a six year 01-i rank outsider, which astonished alike the owner the jockey.and the public, TheGrpat Northern Handicap at York was won by Mr Rich's East Lancashire, and the talent were again in the basket - 17 to 1 against the winner.

_We are now in the midat of that glorious carnivil the Ep^orn week. Conference suspends its sittings ; Parliament take* holiday ; crafty statesman can do their best and their wonst; i'ynasties may rise or fall ; the political state of nations and peoples is ; the Courts are closed, and anxious suitors must wait the run of horstflrsh ! all be-irJes is a<j nothing to us just now— the heart and sml of Cockney laud is in Epsom Ra-es ; and I have only room to say tbnt the great Derby was fought out yesterday, 'the 25th and was won by Mr PAnson's Blair Athol, General Peel was second, and Sroftish Chief third — time 2min. 44 sec. :— betting at starting 9 to 2 ngainst Scottish Chief and General Peel, 13 to 1 against Blair Athol. The weather wis jr'orious, and the multitude immense ; plethoric hampers and hu;e stone Sottles conveyed the inrli«pensahle creature comfotts The Prince of Wales was one of the earliest arrivals on the I'owns; and •something like 150.0C0 visitors at Rpsom ycsterdav will remember the Derby of 1864 as " Blair Af hoi's year." To-morrow is the Jaaies' day, and it is expected that Fill? <3 e I' Air will win the 0 .ks easily, the odds are only 3 to I against her. Sim won the French Oaks on Sunday, 15th insfc ; and on Sunday last the French Derby was won by Bois Hou-sd

The s il-Englund Eleven and the United Eleven commenced their annual match on WhifcMVmdav at Lord's Ground for the benefit of ths Cricketers' Fund ; it lasted three days, and was won 1)7 the United Eleven by two wickets -spore at finish. All- England, 384; the United, 387. Simultaneru-Oy with the above a cricket match was played in France between the Psris Club and our Nottingham men, when the gallant Frenchmen were signally uefeated in this novel passage of arms and letrs ; next year they propose coming to England and try a bout with our famous tu^sex batsmpn.

-'aving ihus inoculated our neichbors with a fever for field sports, we see the f oi3 de Boulogne prepared to rival our Surrey downs, the hmperor himself taking the lead in therace for supremacy: alieady may it be said "they manage things better iv France " N. 111., pre-eminfnt in met mattt-rs, has taught his people to show us how easy it is to lnve race 3 without ruffianism, crowds without mobs, and bookmakers who are to bp found after the race. Th" "arl fiusseU left Plymouth 23rd April, wirh 365 emigrants, for Brisbane. The "Wonato left the Mersey 6th inst, with 405, for Sydney. The Young Australia left Plymouth 14th iu&t, with 258, for Queensland. The Art fJnion left Plymouth IGfcb iost, with 326. for Adelnide. The Dover Castle, iroin Melbourne February 4, and the Duncan Dun bar, from Sydney F<brvmry 14, arrived the 4th inst. The Agincourt, from Melbourne 10th January, arrived on 10th inst. The Lincilnshire, 86 days from Melbourne, arrived 16th inst. The Star of Tasmania, from New Zealand February 8, arrived 7th iust, nil weli. She rounded Cape Horn March 4, and passed the equator April 6. The JVew Zealand mail tells U3. as we expected, of gallant deeds performed by Britain's sons ; and whilst we rrgret such valuable life lo<t without bringing the Maoris to book, it is melancholy fro reflect on the probable long continuance of hostilities, a war of races, of extermination , and as a natural consequence the retarding of progress and prosperity. If it is necessary for our troops to go into winter quarters, and if tulwar is to be resumed in the spring, of course General Cameron will provide himself with ample means for a short and decisive campaign ; but in the mean time the enemy, as it appears to us, will He subject to such fearful privations that common sense must convince him of the hopelessness of further contention ; and we sincerely trust good counsel will prevail. Your affiirs have be. j n subjected to public discussion and parliamentary debatss. New Zealand policy never has been, is not now, and perhaps never will be umiecst^od ia England ; and whiht our rulers are not unmindful of the pre vious " meddle and muddle" of the Home Government in the concerns of your colony, it ia in sisted thaf the war once over we must henceforth enjoy entire freedom from colonial complications ; it is objected that this rebellion should cost mother country a million sterling or more ; your Confiscation Acts likewise are rouehly handled. Mr Cardwell's m \iden speech as Colonial Secretary elicited applause from all pnrtiesj there ia to be a limit placed by the Horn« Government on the operation of those Confiscuion Acts, and your Governor be instructed accordingly ; the rebellion is to be suppressed at auy cost in men and mon«y ; and evtry reasonable inducement wiSI be offered the native race to live with us on friendly terms hereafter— but peace must be effeotually'secured arid future outbreaks rendered impossible or of easy repression ; for it is broadly and plainly stated at home that thenpxt Maori war shall not be fought with British troops, nor paid for out of British taxes.

, Thursday, 26 h May. Ihe American struggle has again commenced— after five days' real hard fighting and immense slaughter nothing decisive was obtained— the Southern loss is unknown but it was doubtless very great— the Northern army acknowledge to a loss of 40,050 men. Thia is really awful ; and we must go back to the days of Sorodina and Leipsie to realise such horrors. Grant was allowed to cross the Rapidan without opposition • and on the sth in«t. Le,e accepted battle at Chancellorsville and Wilderness ; it was resumed on the 6th, and Lee then retired a few miles nearer to Richmond. On the Bth Lee and Grant again ensued swords at Hpottsylvania Court Housp, and the battle raged throughout the day and again on the 9th and 10th with the greatest fury ; but neither sde gained much advantage, each retaining his position • and up to the last telegram (New York, 12th May) nothing further was known, exept that great as had been the carnage no other result was arrived at ; that neither Grant nor Lee had been defeated ; that the battle was to b; resumed on the 11th ; that prayers and thanksgiving were offered up to the Most High for this grea', victor]/ so far over the

rebels ; and that in another little week Grant and his victorious legions would be smoking pipes in Richmond— Lee and Jeff Davies nowhere. The dreaded Alabama is reported on the Californian coast and causing great excitement -the Federal merchantmen all going armed for resistance.

Fresh victories have been announced over the bhoks in San Domingo — but more recent accounts give such serious reverses to tbe Spanish arms as to cause the instant embarkatioq of reinforcements at Cadiz.

Dr Normandy has just died aged 54 ; he was an eminent an&lyticaHchemist, and was patentee of the invaluable apparatus for tbe distillation of aeraied fresh water from the ocean.

European atmospherics are again changing ; we have had one of the hottest Mays on record^ but now the almost suffoentina heat has va> ished' and we are suddenly thrust from the temperature of a July into that of -an October.

'he Pope is alternately telegraphed as better and worse ; but the last accounts which are said to come from the poor old gentleman's bed chamber speak very dolefully, stating also that his successor was beina: elected.

The Duke of Newcastle still continues dangerously ill; an occasional rally quickly followed by a relapse.

Lord Palmerston has partially recovered from his Ion? and obs'inate attack of gout, again attends to business, aud yesterday went to the Derby.

Fresh disturbances ore reported at Athens. French and English war ships contiuue in the neighborhood, and are landing forcis for the protection of life, and property. The last accounts from Algeria give fierce battliner, and sttte that the French General." have put a cordon of troons round the disaffected district 0 . France has suffered s-verely both in men and officers, whilst the los«es of the wild tribes are enormous. The death of Buo ''c Malakoffisalso announced— a fine fat little soldier and askiltnl commander, beyond doubt but merciless, cruel and bloodthi?sty. as any ga'lant Frenchman, who ever epaulets or the grand cross of the Legion of Honor. This warrior started in life as "but a simple plough boy," and died a Marcchal of France at the age of 70, "on the Held of his fame," but he ftll by no caitiff'B band ; he had been ill some time, and with gentle nursing in Paris, would probably have recovered— but even at three score and ten a French soldier knows his duty—" the trumpet sounds, 'thy soul's in arms and eager for ihe fray," these were Pelissier's sentiments ; and death on the battle fieW had more charm for him. than the downy couch of a sick spinster. France and the Emperor lo>e a good soldier in one who literally carried the proverbial "baton in his knap^a^k," although it. to k him 40 years to find it. All the foreign members of our Conference, German ns well as Dane, are in turn waiting on Bonaparte, previous to the next meeting in London; and there's every probtbility that Europe will know its iate on the 28th instant. Austria, Prussia, and the Diet appear determined on despoiling Denmark of the Duchies; but the determination oi England and France is not co clearly defined ; your readers will therefore have to wait another mail for the serious intelligence, whether it is to be peacfror war in the old world.

New York, 14th May. Teloeramg thus headed have just arrived :- Fighting was resumed on the 12th instant—continued furiously all day with awful destruction of life. In the night Lee retired across the river Po to oacupy, it was supposed, some stronger position on the North and South Anna rivers, and on the 13ih Grant was in pursuit. Gold, 72£ per cent premium. Poor Grant !it really looks as if you are following some vnll o' the wisp, and are being lured to perdition.

M. Dtt Cru'LLD-.—Mr Prank Auckland, writ ing to the Field, says :- 1 have just received a letter from thia intrepid traveller, which gives the welcome intelligence that up to this time all is well with him. Of course I shall keep a sharp look out for the cbimpaazses on their arrival— our relations, though, as has been remarked, our poor relations :— My dear Buckland,— L shall shall shortly send two live chimpanzees, a male and a femaie. The male is in a 6plendil state of health, and should not the vessel reach England in winter I should almost feel sure that be would v<ach Lomlon safely. The female is much younger, and I have had her only a few days. Master Thomas {ths name of thß male) is a most funcy fellow, and a great rogue. Ho is exceedingly fond of tea aud coffee, and lately has taken a great fancy to cheese ; but the worst of all, he will not eat cold food. Unlike the former one I had, and the description of « Jiieh f gave in my work, "Equatorial Africa," he cianot bear spirit?, or even the smell. I find him also Je3* intelligent. The first day the female came in he did not care for her in the least, but now he is very foni of her, and they are the greatest part of the day in each other's arm j and he is getting wicked, and haa bitten several people, but he is very tame with me Since my arrival here I have not hunted gorijlas, the fact is, that I have been too busy with other things to go shooting, but in a few days I will start for a country where a very large kind of ant-eater exists I have seen a scale and a claw. I should be very happy to kill one ; it would be a very great curiosity, I will try my best to kill one- I will not start for the interior before the end of May, and shoutd I hunt some animals unknown to us, I sliall apprise you of it. I only wish you were with me to enjoy the fun. Of course one must have good bealth in order to do something, and I hope' that Providence will gram me this great blessing. I shall be very happy to bear from you before ray departure for the interior. Try to write me a few lines by tbe mail to Fernando Fo, my letter to be forwarded to Gaboon.— P. B. By Chaillu. — Pcrnand Van River, Jan. 14.

Mi3cbobnatiow in New York.--" Manhattan " says— " liven women ot rank are married to negroes. A late case has come to light of a very wealthy and very beautiful woman, who resides and owns property iv Fifth Avenue, who is married to a negro, and he is as black a 8 a raveu. She was thrown out of her carriage some years ago ; he picked her up and rook her home. An attachment sprung up, and, having property in her own right, she married him. She had a right to do it. The mob last summer did not know where this interesting couple lived. At present such a couple aa J have described do not parade the streets, but, before the year is over,' it will be quite common. Lst the colored regiments behave gillantly, and come home heroes, and eight o r ten of our leading belles and htiresses will marry negroe", and it will become so common that it will cease to be talked about."

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18640730.2.24

Bibliographic details

LONDON., Otago Witness, Issue 661, 30 July 1864

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8,330

LONDON. Otago Witness, Issue 661, 30 July 1864

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