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DUNSTAN.

(SROM THB DAILY TIMES CORRESPONDENT.) Dunstan, 29th January. The sale of improved town allotments on Thursday last was a great success, ev^ry one purchased their several holdings. The price was seven shillings and sixpence jut foot for the frontage to the Btreet, and two shillings and six- 1 pence extra for corners, being at the rate of about one hundred pounds per acre. Everybody app°are 1 satisfied with the manner the Orowu Lands Commissioner conducted the sale, and the dispensing with an auction by letting each occupier take possession was a great saving of public, time, where, had each sepa'ate lot been submitted to the hammer, the sale instead of occupying one day would have taken throe, besides the advantage of the present system was that one man had an equal chance with the other. The owner of the canvas erection retained his humble property, which otherwise would have been bought over his head by some more opalent and speculative neighbor. The amount of cash received for land (each purchase being paid in full), was nearly thirteen hundred pounds.

That people have confidence in tb.B progressive future of the Dunstan there can be no mistake. The result of the land sale is a sufficient proof of that, Bnd little doubt is entertained that the words made use of by his Honor at the dinner on Monday last, will be fully verified when he says, " I have no doubt about the future of the Dunstan. through it must pass all the traffic to the Lakes, and probably the West Coast, and although in its iuameliate viciuity there may not be a numerous minine population, it will always be the great centre of traffic and commerce in this Province." But we may go much farther than his Honor, who of course has not had time to examine with a careful eye the resources of this district, of which it may ba said they are as yet undeveloped. Beyond a little scratching in the river's babk there has been no great amount of work done here yet, and a large area of ground remains unprotected, leaving alone what gold has been obtained in the ranges, thß banks of the rivers, and the fine flits and terraces contain inexhanata ble mine 3ef wealth. Only on Wednesday last four lncky miners from the Kawarau left by coach on their return to bonnie Scotland, having made during the last six months nearly three thousand poand3 a man, and then did sot thoroughly exhaust their claim. The system of tunnelling and hydraulic mining ia as yet ia Us

infancy, what has been done is a mere bagatelle of that which is to be, our amount of nuriferous drift containing so much gold as will always remuneiste the sluicer and the worker on an extended and scientific scale, is unlimitable. Although some hundreds have left us for Hamiltcn's and other rushe< down country, it has ramie no difference with our gi eat raining companies, who nr? curving on as briskly ns ever, the oniy disadvantage th*y labor und'T has been the dif ficulty in obtaining labor. Our gold escorts ha<.e sustained but slight diminution, which is a con vincing prrof that our perminunt somces of wealth may sifely be relied on, and that the fl ating nominal portion of the population, who spend all their time in 'hifting fromrus-h to rush ontribute but a small share to the general wealth.

Our agricultural capabilities are as yet scarcely tried, beyond a few small gardens, which.have produced amazingly ; nothing on a scale commensurate with farniing on an extensive plan has been attempted. This, of course, is owing to no suburban or agricultural sections being as yet in t.e market ; but when once the land is bought for agricultural purp ses, aid our splendid alluvi il flats are dotted over with the cheerful homes and smiling enclosures of the husbandman, wd we produce that which we at present send out of the Province for a stability and steadiness of trade will be secured to the Dunstan, such as it has never yet enjoyed. With respect to our agricultural and horticultural capabilities, I may ?ay that they are very great. The climate is the finest and warmest in this Province, and the sea-ons are at least two months earlier than about Dunedin, and we could successfully compete, when once the roads are reasonably pood, in the production of numerous fruits and cereals, which are at present imported from Victoria and Tasmania. That even should it be that our auriferous resources should get exhausted, which s not probable for many years to come, the construction of a good line of «nd or a railway, as projected by the Govern nent, will always be remunerative. The necessary goods for the supply of the wants of the inhabitants, together with the marketable produce of the district- itself must alv/ays secure a larsre amount of traffic ; and now that our Progress Committee liave secured for the town so many of the advantages which th?y have so persistently advocated, instead of " lying on their oars" they should turn their attention to the wants of the country, and advocite the cause of the land and the people being settled upon it, and secure that for the Dunstnn which mainly mu-t give it that stability aud permanence we all to much desire.

Returning again to the Township and its -pros pects, now that the land is sold and everybody is his own freeholder, and whose main object will now be the improvement of his property, a great change will shortly be made in rhe outward appearance of the numerous buildings contained therein. The canvas will give way to iron, and that in its turn to wood and stona, and perhaps brick, but the latter must nlways be a scarce article from the almost total absence of ctoy and wood, two very necessary ingredients in the making of bricks. But of stone, we have sufficient to build a city of any dimensions whatever ; an • as His Honor evidently foreseeing the future importance of the town of Clyde, and fully anticipating the pleasure of granting it a Town Board, or perhaps a municipality, we must do our bet that we may help ourselves by putting ou~ shoulder to tbe wheel, and using evi-ry effort we possess in developing the resources of the district, thereby realising his H onor's prophecy that**' The Dunstan would become the great centre ofcoinmerne and traffic in this Province."

The annual meeting of subscribers and contributors to the Dunstan Hospital was held at the Union Hotel on Wednesday last, and the new commit'ee of management, consisting of the following gentlemen, were elected : Messrs II W. Robinson, President; Staite, Secretary; White, Treasurer ; Fitch, Jacobs, Morie, Home, G. Harper, Miller, Ryan, Ferand. Gundley, Hun c, A. Jack, Dawning, members of committee.

Drs Moriee and Shaw were elected Honorary Surgeons, and Mr P. Harold and Thos. Munro, auditors. The meeting was a vary lona: one and rather incline.l to be stormy, but the particulars woul 1 not be interesting to the general reader. The present committee are eentlemen well known and respected on the Dunstan, and who on all occasions of public trust have acquitted themselves honorably.

Before startms to the Lakes on Tueslay Last, his Honor the Superintendent forwarded written replies to the difl'jrent addresses presented to him during his visit.

To that of the Progress Committee his Honor says : —

Ist. The construction of a bridge across the Kawarau is determined on by the Government, and will be proceeded with when the Chief fioari Engineer has satisfied himself upon the most available Bite for its erection.

2nd. A bridge across the Molyneux in connection with the great trunk road from Dunediu to the Lakes will also be made, but the Govern ment must be guided by the opinions of competent engineers. 3rd. steps will be taken to ascertain the probable cost of a dray road to the Nevis, and its construction proceeded with ehould the Government be in a position to undertake the work.

4tb. The Government consider it no longer necessary or advisable to subsidise prospecting parties, except under special circumstances, being of opinion that private enterprise is productive of better results than the efforts of the Government in a similar direction. But should there, however, be found to exist such circumstances of speciality in any one particular case as would justify the Government in treating it a 9 an exceptional one, it shall receive full and fair consideration.

sfch. The establishment of a Supreme Court, and local management necessary for its constant working, are properly matters for the General Government to provide for ; but as soon as I am informed of the appointment of a juogo for the mining districts, the Provincial Government will make such arrangements that the new judge Bhall exercise his functions immediately.

6ch. With respect to the communication from the occupiers of block 25, arrangements will be made to accommodate public necessity to p.ivate interests, by disturbing the latter "as little as possible. But as the town of Clyde is to become th«! main thoroughfare for' traffic between Dunedin and the Lakes, it will be far better that a few buildings constructed for temporary purposes, and of fragile material* be sacrificed, than that a permanent and irrevocable injury be dove, not only to the township but the whole country also.

7th. That the appointment of a J ditional Justices of the Peace will be made as soon aa t c requirements of the case he ascertained, Bth. With the erection of a pound, it is not the^ intention of the Government to proceed until its necessity he more apparent. "**~Z With rf red to the petition from the inhabitants of the Nevis, his Honor replies -that nearly the whole of the requests of the meinorialiaU hive been anticipated by the Government, and that at all times the Government are anxious to mitiaate any ev\h the settlers in the outlying districts may be laboring under. Also, that any future representations of the warts of the neopla cf the Nevis will meet with that consideration they are fairly entitled to.

A first rate rush has taken place at CnmpfceH'3 Gully, near the Junction of Potters No. 2. At this point the gully is very wide, the sinking is about 25 feet in depth with very little water. •Vs much as 125 ounces of gold was taken oft rhe bottom of a paddock last week, also, tw» others obtained nearly the same amounts, becides a large number fire getting payable gold. The weather in this district is very favorable for working, most of the snow having: disappeared beneath the warm sunny sky. All the severri heads of the Wiakia are turning out vf ry well ; the mountain torrents have considerably abated, and in many cases dried up altogether, and nttime could be more favorable for mining operationsHhan the present. A skeleton was found on Thursday last near the track leading from Timber Gully to the Teviot. It is supposed to be that of some unfortunate who perished about the time of the great storm.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

DUNSTAN., Otago Witness, Issue 636, 6 February 1864

Word Count
1,859

DUNSTAN. Otago Witness, Issue 636, 6 February 1864

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