Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

News of the Week.

(prom the dailf. times.)

There is a probability that the Northern Island may yet rejoice in the possession of alluvial gold fields. We remember that after MiHartley's return from hi 3 visit to Coromandel he expressly privately a very strong opinion that the Thames would prove auriferous, and it would appear that the Government have for some time been in possession of information on this point. In the House the other day, Mr Vogel aßked for the production of any papers or information in possession of the Governmeni-, relating to the finding, or probability of finding gold at the Waikato. He said, since he had given notice of this motion, he believed that some important information had reached the Government with respect to thefindiug of gold in the tributaries of the Thames, and he, therefore, begged to add the words "and the Thames." He had frequently heard of reports coming down, of gold having been found in the tributaries of the Waikato and the Thames. And he had been told that when Mr Mantell was in office, application had been made to have the country in the neighborhood of the Thames examined, it being reported at the time, that nuggets of an ounce in weight had been discoyered there. The Government refused to have this examination made, on the grounds, he believed, that it might cause a disturbance with the natives. The Government promised to afford such information as it possessed. The Southern Cross, on this subject, says :—": — " The question raised in the House of Representatives yesterday by Mr Vogel, member for Dunedin North, regarding the reported existence of gold deposits in the Waikato and Thames Districts, is of great importance to this community. We agree with that gentleman, that the discovery of alluvial diggings in the disturbed districts would go far towards solving the native question, and more especially so now that the authorities have resolved to treat the Maories in all respects as British subjects. The difficulties that stood in the way of prospecting native lands alone prevented the development of the gold field, which old residents and traders are persuaded, from actual observation, exists in the valley of the Thames. Sufficient is known by the authorities, however, to justify us in saying that the existence of the precious metal in the alluvial deposits of the Thames valley is beyond a shadow of doubt; and we recollect a leading chief remaining in Auckland for several days, to conter with the Governor on the'suhject/.at the time his Excellency ■was away on his memorable visit to the Upper Waikatos. The Thames natives then feared that the Europeans would succeed in demonstrating to the world the existence of extensive gold deposits in their country, and they desired to make an arrangement by which they were to have the exclusive right to dig on unalieniated land, with the additional privilege of trying their luck on any land over which the native title had been extinguished. Of course, this modest request could not be complied with, and the native outbreak following so .soon alter, rendered prospecting in the Thames valley out of the question. In fact, the Thames valley never has been prospected ; but now that a large force is being despatched to occupy the land there, which has been forfeited by repeated acts of rebellion and bloodshed, we think it would be highly desirable if .an effort were made to prospect the district. If gold be discovered in the Thames district in paying quantities, no doubt enough men will be attracted thither to hold it against the natives, and thus liberate a very considerable force for service elsewhese. Anyhow, it is worth trying. With regard to the Waikato, our information is less precise. We believe gold will also be found in the Waikato, but whether in paying quantities is another matter. We agree with Mr Turton that the Settlement Act should exempt all auriferous land. This is an important matter, and we trust it will not be allowed to drop." We copy the following from the Riverton correspondence of the " Inveicargill Times'' of the 4th inst :— "The rumors which have probably reached Invercargill as to discovery of gold in the vicinity of Riverton, turn out to be not altogether without foundation. A well-known road contractor has been in town to-day, and showed me some specimens of the gold, that at three feet sinking presented themselves, seven miles from Riverton. The samples produced (an oz in weight), were adherent to small .lumps of quartz ; and of a quality that promised the the vicinity of payable reefs. Some of the sceptical talked of drift from far away El Doradoes, but I think they are wrong. This town has been for a week past in a state of ferment about this supposed adjacent gold-field. Various prospecting parties have been fitted out and despatched to the spot ; and the whole of the inhabitants are prepared, at the first reliable intelligence, to abandon humdrum occupation and take to cradle and pick. In the meantime I would suggest to the sanguine unemployed that the Vestiges of Creation, that is to say, gold creation, < though manifest, are not yet so frequent as to warrant a rush; but I think that I am not an over optimist in hinting that there is a good time coming. Expectation is on tiptoe in regard to the next intelligence from Gummy's Bush." The " Southland News" of the following day says:-?-" As some interest has been displayed by a number of miners with reference to the discovery of gold at Riverton, as reported in yesterday's " Invercargill Times," we beg to state that no confirmatory news has reached us, up to the time of our going to press. It may be well, therefore, to avoid undue precipitancy in 'rushing' the gold field at Gummy's Bush." The following is a translation of the account of the action at Rangiriri, printed in the Native language by the authority of the Government for circulation amongst the Maoris ; — "This is the intelligence from Waikato, which arrived on the evening of Saturday, the 21st instant. On the morning of the 20th November, the forces of the General proceeded to Rangariri to attack ifc. Of these forces five hundred went by steamer, and seven hundred by land. The steamers continued their course till Rangariri was left behind. Then the soldiers were lauded. The soldiers had not yet commenced firing. But the big guns were at work. When the soldiers had landed, the General ordered them to storm the earthworks. Waikato continued firing : but what mattered this to soldiers ! Forward they went — right up to the muzzles of the guns. They stormed the earthworks and the enemy retreated, forsaking their redoubt and leaving their dead and wounded in the hands of the soldiers. The fugitives betook themselves to the swamps towards the Waikarp Lake. Then they swam for it and fled. It is said that Matutaera himself was among these fugitives. While one division of the forces was thus engaged, another division was led against the Pa. The first line of earthworks was stormed and taken. The soldiers then converted this into £ redoubt for themselves. The Maoris retreated to their 4bg position — the pa itself. In their pa the WailaHb manifested great bravery. The earthworksvrere on a large scale. Tho trenches were nine feet wide at the top, and the walls were twenty feet high. This was apa indeed ! It was stormed onee — and a second time — and a third time— but without success. The General saw that he was only wasting his own men, and he ordered the great guns to fire. During the night the forces surrounded the pa, and left no retreat for the remnant. On the morning of Saturday, a white flag was seen hoisted in the pa, and the firing at pnee ceased. The survivors surrendered themselves. One hundred and eighty-three thus came into the hands of the General. The aristocracy of Waikato are among them. The Prisoners will be brought to Auckland and placed on board a war-ship, now in the harbour, till the pleasure of the Governor respecting them be known. The number of Maoris killed is not yet ascertained. But they were very many, and all the bodies were left behind. A search is now being made for them in the scrub, in the swamps, and under; water. Those who witnessed all this stay, there were two hundred killed, but this is not yet certain. On the Pakeha side, thirty-five were Killed, including two officers, and ninety were "wounded. Most of these fell when they were storming the earthworks. (Signed) W. Fox, Na Te Pokiha. Auckland, the 23rd November. 1863." ' It will be interesting to many to read the figures which show the number and amount of money orders issued and paid in Dunedin during the month of November. Since the money order office was opened here 5368 orders have been issued, 587 of which passed dm'iag the last inontb. The total number of orders representthe sum of L 27.743 2s, that for November being L 3162 4s 6d. Agaiust this 1223 orders have been paid, the aggregate value of which is L 6218 3s, the month of November showing 147 orders, *niountingtoL7H 13g8d. j

At the ProvineialHotel on Monday evening (Cap. Rees in the chair) the members of the Fire Brigade held their annual meeting, the advertised business of which was the election of officers for the ensuing year. The minutes having heen read and confirmed, the receipt of a donation of L 5 from Mr Haddock was ordered to be entered in the minutes, no other means of acknowledgment remaining, as the donor has recently left Dunedin. A claim of Mr Ilalliday for 15s for extra drinks to members of the brigade at the late fire in St. Andrews street was disallowed, as the liquor had been supplied without presentation of the refreshment ticket negotiable on such occasions. Captain Rees then proceeded to the main business, and in a short address referred to his appointment 15 months ago to his present office ; to the difficulties which beset and hampered the institution in its infancy ; and to the present sound footing upon which the Dunedin Volunteer Fire Brigade now rested ; its claims for public support, as a well organised institution being universally acknowledged by the inhabitants. During the term of his captaincy the unanimous support of the members of this highly useful public body had been extended to him in his efforts, both in and out of doors, and he expressed a hope that the same unanimity of feeling which had characterised their actions hitherto, would be continued whether in deliberation at meetings, or in action at fires. The Captain then retired from the chair which was taken by Lieutenant Hobbs, to conduct the election of the first officer by ballot. Two members were nominated for the post of Captain— Messrs C. Rees and J. W. Robinson, and the ballot being taken, 19 votes were recorded for Captain Rees, 11 for Foreman Robinson, The present Captain was, declared, therefore, to be re-elected. For this as for the several subaltern officers a number of candidates were proposed who declined the honor, and the Secretary, Mr Schrader having intimated his desire to resign in consequence of his intended removal from Dunedin, Mr R. Edwards was elected in his stead. The other appointments — those of Lieutenant, Treasurer, Foreman ot the Hook and Lidder and of the Hose Companies — were reconferred upon the officers whose previous services in their respective capacities seemed to have given general satisfaction to the members of the Brigade. A Brisbane telegram reports :— " The captain and crew of the American whaler Hope have arrived here in boats. The ship was wrecked on Brampton shoal on the 17th of October. They report the loss of the Sporting Lass on the same shoal. The crew left in company, but parted on Thursday last. Supposed to have gone towards Sydney." We are in receipt of later telegraphic news from Adelaide contained in the Melbourne papers brought by the Star. "We extract the more important items :— " There has been a severe thunderstorm. It is reported that a man has been killed by lightning. A trooper has been despatched for inquiry. Thompson, who wa3 apprehended at Sandridge for embezzlement, has been brought before the Magistrates, and remanded until Friday. A new small bore rifle club has been started, under the title of the City Rifle Club, limited to twenty-one members. Go vernment is preparing a pamphlet on the northern territory for trransmission to England by the out-going mail. It contains information to guide intending purchasers. There will be no expedition for the north till the end of March. Twenty thousand bushels wheat of the new crop, for delivery in January, were sold at 4s and 4s Id. Samuel Good, Mayor of Adelaide, is unopposed. The flower show was largely attended, and was a good exhibition. Parr's fourth wool sale— Fleece, Is 2d to Is 3d : greasy, Bdto9£d." ' By the Star, from Melbourne, we have the following later items of news by telegraph, from Sydney :— « In the Assembly, Mr Martin stated that the Ministry do not intend introducing any business but the Estimates during the present session. Mr Morris gave notice that he would bring the Riverine petition before the House, with a view to redress of grievances. The steamer Alexandra, from Melbourne to Auckland, has put in for coals. Western escort, G627 ounces. A telegram received states that Judge Callaghan's life is despaired of. Heavy thunderstorm last night throughout the colony. The lightning entered the telegraph-office at Yass, and stunned the operator. In the Assembly, notice is given to move for a pension to Mrs Cnisholm. The Scab Bill,, has passed the Assembly. Government do not intend making any permanent provision for the Mint during the present session . Mr Packer, musical composer, has been committed for trial for bigamy. At the opening of the wool sales at the Exchange, the biddings were spirited, and a slight advance was obtained. Tallow higher. Mr Dean offered a quantity of Mauritius sugars ; about 100 tons were sold at a slight advance on late rates ; the balance was withdrawn for higher rates. The Bank of New South Wales suspect the recent forgery to be a conspiracy, and offer LSOO reward for the conviction cf the persons concerned. Arrived : Susannah Booth, from Ofcago. The schooner Herculean entering Newcastle Harbor this morning, with a heavy sea on drove on the rocks off Nobby's, and became a total wreck. Crew saved.'' Several horses are now located near Timaru for the ensuing races, and Mr Henry Knight has already three in training. Mr Samuels' mare Blink Bonny has been sold to Mr M'Kinlay for a large snm. She is to ran for the Maiden Plate, and is aid to have a very good chance of winning. The Southland people certainly deserve to find their much-wi&hed-for gold field. The "Southland News," of the sth instant, says :— "We are happy to find by the list published in this day's issue that the subsidy of LISOO to be raised by the inhabitants of Invercargill, as supplementary to the advertised Government reward of LIOOO for the discovery of a payable gold field in Southland, is more than covered by the guaranteed subscriptions, amounting to no less a sum than Llßl9. As will be seen, the subscribers form but a small section of our citizens. There can be now no longer any lingering doubt on the minds of energetic prospectors as to the bona fides of the reward offered ; and we are certain that many will be induced to follow the example of those enterprising parties who have already entered the lists in competition for the tempting little pile of L 2500, in addition to such further ' lob' as may accrue in the course of gold field discovery. It is so well known that gold exists in this province that reiteration is useless. Perseverance and a practical knowledge of mining, with a dash of what is known as luck, is all that is required to secure the born^s." The body of a man named John Thompson was picked up early on Sunday morning near the new Jetty] The deceased was formerly mate of the brig Yarra, He was seen in town at half-past nine o'clock on Saturday evening, and his watch was found to be stopped at half-past ten. The body lies at the Cafe do Paris, Jetty street, awaiting the inquest, which will, no doubt, be held to-day. Mr Justice Gresson has endorsed the opinion expressed by his Honor Mr Justice Richmond, as to the impossibility of carrying out any efficient system of prison discipline under the existing prison arrangements in this colony. In his charge to the Grand Jury, at Christchurch, the o'her day, he said—-" It was idle to think of a complete system of prison discipline in the present state of our gaols," The " Argns," of 27th November, says :— " The mail steamship Madras sailed yesterday for Galle punctually at the usual hour. She has a very valuable cargo on board. The gold shipped at Melbourne exceeds L 400.000 sterling ia value, and with that placed on board at Sydney, makes the value of the bullion she carries considerably over half a million." Several nuggets were on view in a GoM Broker's window, in Princes street (Mr B. Marks'), on Saturday last. ' The largest of them weighs twelve ounces, the remainder ranging from . about hali' an ounce to three ounces. They aie ' of good color, and free from quartz or other admixture. They were said to have been found at the rush between Waitihuna and Waipori, reported in our columns a few days back. The nuggets were sold by two men, and were included in lots of 1 9 oz and 34 oz. The large one was included in the fo/iner quantity, in which there was not \ dwt bf find gold. This nugget is a beautiful "specimen,"* and is slightly oxydised on one side. It was yesterday submitted to the members of the Executive, by Mr Vincent Pykc, the Gold Fields Secretary. We hear that the New Zealand Banking Corporation have purchased the premises of Messrs Smith and Marshall, in Manse-street, and that the Corporation intend to commence banking business as soon as the necessary alterations are effected, > •' .

The election of members of the Town Board to fill the vacancies caused by the retirement, according to rotation, of one member for taoli of the four Wards, took place on Monday. Very little interest was excited, even in Bell Ward, where there were five candidates. In High Ward, Mr. J. H. Jenkinson, the retiring member, was re-elected without opposition, 13 votes having been recorded for him when the poll was closed at eleven o'clock ; and in Leith Ward, there was a similar result in the case of Mr. Thomas Kedmayne, who received 35 votes before the poll was declared to be closed. The polling-place was at the Town Board Office, for the former Ward, and at Messrs. Watson and Kerr's store, Great Kingstreet, for tho latter. In Bell Ward, Mr. D. Milne, the late member, was again brought forward, but was unsuccessful, Mr. James Black being returned. At the close of the poll, at four o'clock, the numbers were — James Black, 5C ; David Miller, 46 ; David Milne, 27 ; C. T, Ick, 19 ;D. 11, Miller, 4. In Lath Ward, Mr. J. S. Webb, the retiring member, did not again present himself, and Mr. James Lowe was chosen ; the numbers at four o'clock being— James Lowe, 18 ; S. Sims, 13. Mr. James Keenan icttied at halfpast eleven o'clock, at which time four votes for him had been recorded. The polling-booth for Bell Ward was at the Odd Fellows' Hall, and that for South Ward at the Imperial Hotel. Mr S. Jones left Dunedin for Lyttelton last Tuesday, having received intelligence that his personal presence was required to compMe the necessary nrrangements for the proposed visit to Christchurch, of the All England Eleven ; and on Sunday morning he landed again at Port Chalmers, having, we understand, satisfactorily settled everything in this hurried trip. Mr Jones informs us that he was received in a liberal spirit by the Match Committee, and that despite the present time being ill adapted for raising the promised pecuniary subsidy, owing to the principal settlers being occupied with their sheep - shearing, the subscrption list was being handsomely filled up. Within a very i few hours of his arrival all essential docu- j ments and contracts were " signed and sealed," and the terms agreed upon afforded mutual content. Having learned that the 16th instant is a great holiday at Canterbury, being the anniversary of Separation, and that the first cricket match of the season was fixed to be played on that date, Mr Jones offered to have the ground selected for the All-England game completely fenced in by that time, as ivell as a major part of the stand erected, and the work was actually commenced the next day. The paled-iu area is to be 600 yards in circumference, and the stand 220 feet long by 28 feet deep. The Christchurch Club Pavilion is also to he embellished for the use of the elite, and spacious refreshment marquees will be fitted up, on the grand occasion of the contest with the Antipodean Champions of cricket. Mr Jones saya that considerable excitement exists in reference to the ' coming event,' and that already the Canterbury players are practising hard tor the Interprovincial Match at Dunedin, which is to try their local strength against the picked eleven of Otago, and be the | opening scene of the ball' in New Zealand. It is to be hoped that our own men will take warning from this, and not leave a stone unturned to save the laurels of this province. Constant handling of bat and ball, vigorous exertion in active fielding, and utter abandonment of petty jealousies, are the requisites essential to secure the much coveted success. > The " Lyttelton Times" says :— A new Provincial Executive has been formed ; but we are yet in the dark—so far as any official information goes— as to the reasons for the late crisis. It must be assumed that the gentlemen now taking office are satisfied as to the substantial merits of the case. We confess that we aye not, and that quite enough has become public on sufficiently good authority to justify our demand for publicity and an appeal to the public in the shape of a dissolution. The following advice respecting crossing dangerous rivcw maybe useful :— "The safe mode of swimming rivers on horseback should be held in remembrance by every one. Take off heavy boots a»cl heavy coat, and strap them to your saddle, take your feet out of the stirrup-;, throw the reins on the horse's neck, and by no means check him. If danger is apprehended, slip off the saddle and hold firmly by the tail of the horse, who will ninety-nine times out of a hundred carry you safely to terra firma. When a horse is checked whilst swimming, his hind legs go under his fore, and he falls backwards, which usually terminates fatally to the rider and to the horse also." The great] pension question in Melbourne is passing into a new phase. The Supreme Court is being moved to action on behalf of the dispossessed placemen. We read that rules nisi were granted, on the applications of Mr R. D. Ireland and Mr C. G. Duffy, calling on the Colonial Treasurer to show cause why a mandamus should not issue, commanding him to do what is legally necessary to enable those gentlemen to enjoy their potitical pensions. The rules were to be argued some day this week. An inquest was held at twelve o'clock yesterday at the Cafe de Paris on the body of John Thompson, formerly mate of the schooner Yarra, whose bod v was found on Sunday morning close to the Old Jetty. The deceased was seen by some of his acquaintances on Saturday evening at halfpast nine o'clock, when he was perfectly sober. It is supposed that in stepping from the jetty to the Pioneer schooner, to which his boat was made fast, deceased missed his footing and fell into the water. The jury returned a verdict of " Found drowned. A committee meeting of the members of the Caledonian Society, took place at M'Cubbin's Hotel on Monday evening, when the programme for the forthcoming gathering was arranged, and prizes amounting to one hundred and sixty pounds for the several games were decided upon. The sports will be of various and attractive character, and judging by the enthusiasm displayed by the mcnibfers. there is every reason to believe that the Caledonian Society at its next grand gathering, will equal, if not excel, its national demonstration of last year. The New Zealander of the 24th November gives some late particulars in connection with the action at Rangiriri, by which it would appear the loss on the European side was much more severe than at first reported. It is stated that 37 were killed and 98 wounded, and that " several of the wounded are since dead, and but slight I hopes are entertained of the recovery of others." Of the enemy 80 bodies are said to have been found and 9p wounded, making, with the 180 prisoners, a total loss to the reheis of 350 men. Speaking of Mr Grace, a gentleman player -rpn<s of the All England party of cricketers now on board the Great Britain — the " Court Journal " s.ays : — ". Mr Qrace, the great amateur cricketer—perhaps the finest player in the world, including even professionals—is a temperance man, at least during cricketing times. Mr Grace then takes no stimulants, not even tea; and he smokes not at all." Mr John Dewo has notified big retirement from the representation of Tokomairiro, in consequence of his having been appointed to an office under the General Government. The hew Provincial Hotel at Port Chalmers, which is in many respects the finest building yet erected in the Port, was formally opened last week by the spirited proprietor, Mr Galbraith, inviting to a public entertainment alarge majority of the inhabitants. At this reunion, which was one of the most pleasant festive meetings which have yet taken place in Port Chalmers, a sumptuous supper was laid in the spacious diningroom of the house, and the billiard-room, since fitted up with the second prize Exhibition table, was converted into a ball room, where, under a canopy of colors and evergreens, the party kept up to the dance to an advanced hour. O,f course during the evening, all honor waa paid to the host in speeches and in toaat, for the enterprise he has shown in erecting both at the Junction and the Port, two of the best hotels in the Province. On dismissing the Jury from further attendance at the Supreme Court on Tuesday evening, the Foreman of the Jury asked Mr Justice Richmond if there wag any remuneration allowed to Jurors, His Honor said he was afraid not, but recommended them to apply at the Treasury. For his own part he certainly thought the poorer class of jurymen ought to be compensated for the loss they sustained in their attendance. That opinion was not coincided in by all his brother Judges, but Mr Justice Gresson fully concurred in his views on the subject. The West Taieri weekly escort arrived in town at a quarter to 4 on Tuesday afternoon, bringing d.own 868oz Bdwt gold. The roads are described as being in a worse condition t'ha,n they were a few weeks ago, whpn \t was supposed they could hardly be more disagreeable or dangerous, ;

The Criminal Sitting of the Supreme Comt closed on Tuesday evening at a fete hour. The jury not being discharged until a quarter past 1 2 o'clock, George Pickup, convicted on Monday ot larceny, was sentenced to nine months' imprisonment with hard labor. Thomas Frost and John James were convicted of horse stealing. The former was sentenced to two years' imprisonment, and | the latter, having been recommended to mercy by the Jury, to six .months' hard labor. On a second charge of horse stealing, Frost was pronounced not guilty. Mr C. R. Swyer, charged with forcible entry into the coal shed and platform of George Green, was pronounced not guilty, but deserving of censure on account of the course he had taken. His Honor adjourned the Court to Monday ne t at 11 o'clock. One of the men in a recently raised corps of militia volunteers has been forgetful of the due obligations of military service, and suffered accordingly. For " using improper language" to his sergeant, and aiterwards breaking his arrest he has been sentenced to 28 and 84 day's imprisonment, respectively. The Resident Magistrate at Port Chalmers now holds his Court iv the new Masonic Hall, a commodious building, situated near Mussel Bay, and immediately contiguous to George-street, I which is the principal thoroughfare. Though a I change for the better has thus been temporarily made, there is still urgent necessity for the erection of proper court buildings, the situation ot the hall not being the most convenient, especially at the present time, when the portion ot street leading thereto is fiequently impassable. Owing to the resignation of Mr Switzer, a vacancy has been occasioned in the Town Board, and the election of a member to fill it will take place on the 16th instant. During the argument of some great mining appeals in the Supreme Court of Victoria last week, counsel argued that on one view of the law a company might lose its shaft, and all the enormous capital laid out in forming it, by discovering the ivrong lead. Counsel on the "other side fired this pellet in answer :—: — Full many a shaft at random sent Finds lords the sinkers little meant ; And by decrees at random spoken, A paying company ia broken. We are given to understand that the new Judgeship for the Southland and Diggings District has been conferred on Mr Sewell, the Attorney General under the last Fox Ministry. The Argus of the 2nd inst. says : "At a meeting of the International and Intercolonial Cricket Committee, which was held at the Clarance Hotel yesterday afternoon, Mr S. Woolley in the chair, it was resolved that the first match to be played in the colony on the arrival of the English team should be twenty-two of Victoria against the All-England Eleven, and that it should take place on the Ist, 2nd, and 4th days of January, It was also agreed that, in the event of an eleven of the Albert Clab of Sydney I accepting a challenge, sent from the Melbourne Club, to play an eleven of the latter here, of which there is at present some prospect, they should be asked to play in a united twenty-two match against the Englishmen. The Auckland Races come off on the Ist and 2nd of January, 1864. On the first day, the races on the card will be a Maiden Plate of 100 soys, with sweepstakes of 10 soys added; the Ladies' Purse of —soys, welter weights ; a Royal Cavalry Volunteer Plate, for horses the property of members of the corps ; an Innkeeper's Plate, of— soys ; a Farmer's Plate, of — soys ; and a pony race. The second day opens with a Maiden Produce, of — soys, for horses bred in the colony ; then will follow the Jockey Club Plate, ol 200 soys, with a sweepstakes of 10 soys, and, for this race the following horses are entered ;— Mr Redwood's eh m Ladybird, Mr Redwood's eh c Regnum, Mr Morse's blk g Chrysalis, Mr Cameron's brg Volunteer, Mr Macfarlane's br g Koheroa, Mr Wild's br gGa rotter, Mr Wild ns br m Brunetta, Mr St. Hill's b m Siren, Capt Walrasiey's eh h Maori Chief, Mr Rogers's g g Sam Slick, Mr King's eh g Butterfly. The remaining races of the day are a Hurdle Race, a Military Plate, the Consolation Stakes, and a Forced Handicap. The entries are to be made on or before the 24th of December. The Secretary of the Education Board by advertisement in the " Gazette" of the 9th instant, asks for tenders for the erection of Schoolhouses for South Dunedin and Wakari respectively. Tenders are invited by the Secretary for Public Works, by advertisement in the "Provincial Gazette," 9th December, for 300 yards of road metal for the Road, Northern Trunk, Port Chalmers ; for the construction of a lock-up at West Taieri ; for 240 yards of metal for the Pine Hill road ; for 300 yards of metal for the portion of the Main North Trunk, between the 4th and 6th mile posts from Dunedin ; for the construction of about 2 miles and 60 chains of the Northern Trunk road through the Hawkesbury District ; for stone for about 4 miles of the Southern Trunk Road between the south branch of the Tokomairiro River and the crossing of Lovell's Creek : for the erection of a court-house at Port Chalmers ; and for the supply, delivery, erection, and maintenance of telegraph posts between Tokomairiro and the Wakatipu Lake. A meeting of the Otago General Road Board is appointed to be held at the Government oftices, Dunedin, on Friday week, the 18th instant, at noon, for the dispatch of business. John Ilavdy, Esq., M.P.C., George Hepburn, Esq., M.P.C., and George Duncan, Esq., M.P.C., are appointed under the Superintendent's warwant, Commissioners to inquire into and receive evidence upon the question of roads and their deviations throughout the Province of Otago. By advertisement in the " Provincial Gazette" of the 9th instant, tenders are invited by the Provincial Secretary for five tons of hay or chaff, 100 bushels of colonial oats, and 20 bushels of" bran, to be delivered at the Teviot Station ; and also separate tenders for the supply of Manuka firewood and coals during the year 1864 for the Government offices, Police offices, Gaol, Hospital, Lunatic Asylum, Immigrants' Barracks in Dunedin. The people of Nelson, true to their reputation for somnolency, appear to manifest the utmost indifference concerning their West Coast gold fields. Jn spite of urgent representations from, the miners of the necessity of proclaiming the Buller diggings a gold field, the Government took no steps in the matter, and, we now leavn from the "Nelson Examiner" that a meeting I called for the purpose of memorialising the GoJ vernment to proclaim the Buller district a gold field, " was so thinly attended that, after electing a Chairman, the meeting was adjourned for a week." The following land sales are advertised in the " Provincial Government Gazette" of Wednesday : I —"Township of Clyde, on the east bank of the i Clutha, Upper Dunstan Township, at the Camp, on the 11th January, at 11 o'clock, a.m.; township of Cromwell, at the junction of $he I^awarau and Clutha Rivers, at the Camp, on the 13th ■January, at 11 a.m. ; township of Frankton, at the junction of the Wakatipu Lake with the j Kawarau River, at the Camp, on Friday, the 15th January, at 1 1 a.m. ; township of Queenstown, on the north bank of the Wakatipu Lake, at the Camp, on Monday, the 18th January, at 1 1 a.m. ; ani township of Kingstown, at the south end of the Wakatipu Lake, on Thursday, the 21st Jannary, at 11 o'clock. j The annual meeting to consider the applications made for the granting and renewal of Auctioneers' Licenses, is appointed to be held in the Provincial Secretary's Office, Dunedin, on Monday, the 28th of this month, at two o'clock in the afternoon. ! We were shown the other day a very fine sample | ot gold, weighing about 20 os, purchased at the West Taieri by Mr Lyons. The parties who sold the gold would not disclose the locality where it was found. Some good finds are being mado in the hills about Blacksmith's Gully, to. which there was a rush a few days since. We notice that the schooner Pryde has been chartered by the Provincial Government to proceed to the Kaduku River, Martin's Bay, on the West Coast, and is to sail on the 14th inst. The Provincial Treasurer, by advertisement in the " Provincial Gazette," of the 9th instant, asks for tenders for the supply of rations and medical comforts for the Dunedin Hospital and Lunatic Asylum for, the year ending 30th Deoemher, 1864,. By announcement in the " Provincial Gazette," the Provincial Government offices in^Dunedin will not be opened on the Fast Day, Thursday ; next, the I7th inst,

At half-past four o'clock on Thursday afternoon the premises of Mr R. Little, wine and spirit merchant, in High-street, were discovered to be on fire. The storeman quickly gave the alarm, the fire bell rang, and Captain Rees and the fire b:igade, with their engine and implements, were on the spot in an incredible short space of time. Fortunately their services availed to prevent any serious damage. On examination of the ware" house the fire was found to be confined to the space between the ceiling and the flooring of an upper floor, and on account of being thus comparatively deprived of air it was restricted to the space between two joists; neither the flooring boards nor the ceiling being more than charred through. A minute or two more and the place would have been in a blaze. It was extinguished by a few buckets of water thrown upon it by hand after the floor had been cut into by the brigade. The ciuse of it is a mystery. On examination of the pluce a quantity of shavings were found, which appeared to have fallen in there when the building was erected ; and even on such an assnmpttion it is difficult to account foi their igniting in such a position. The city owes much to the Fire Brigade for their prompt and energetic action, for there is every probability, had there been the ! least delay, that an immense amount of property would have been sacrificed. We understand none of the members were absent. We have been informed that the premises were insured but that there was no insurance on the stock. Mr Warden Beethatn, writing from Waikatipu under date November 28th, says :—": — " I have received no further information respecting the reported discovery of new ground in the neighborhood of Moonlight. A few parties still continue quietly at work on the shores of the Lake, finding heavy gold as near as they can work to the water. The weather has been fino and hot during the week, and there appears every probability of the river continuing to fall ; parties turning the River Shotover are taking advantage of the fine weather, and works are progressing most favorably," The following paragraph from the "Taranaki Herald " relates to the Otago Volunteers, serving I at Taranaki: "It will be of the greatest interest to the Otago Volunteers to learn that Mr Thos. Jackson yesterday received a communication from the General Government to the effect that the Memorial (forwarded through Captain Atkinson) signed by all the Otago Volunteers to this place, praying that the land to which they will become entitled may be in their power to will to their wives and families, or other persons, has been granted to them. The amended clause is now, therefore, as follows :— "In case of the death of any settler before he shall become entitled to his Crown Grant, the land to which he is entitled will be granted to his wife or children, or to such other person as he shall by writing appoint, or it may be taken by the Government for the location of another settler under these conditions, or for any other purpose ; but the value thereof in such latter case will be determined by valuation, and the atnonnt paid by the Government to the settler's widow or children, or other person appointed as aforesaid." Mr Jackson, were are informed, has been very active in promoting the interests of the Volunteers since coming here, and we are glad to find that they are about to present him with a handsome testimonial as an acknowledgment of this and other important advantages he has been instrumental in gaining for them," ] Mr. Warden Worthington, writing from Waitahuna, under date sth December says :—: — " The population seems to be steadily increasing at the Waipori, not, I think, from new arrivals in the Province, but the return of old 1 an Is who, after trying the up-country districts fi id they cannot do better than return to a field that will always give them good wages. Bolger's Gully, the scene of ttie late rush between Waitahuna and Waipori, has heen turning out some good nuggets. Three were brought in to the township at the latter place last week, one of which weighed eleven ounces and a-half, and the other two five ounces each. Another nugget weighing six ounces and a-half was brought into Weatherstone's from fhe same place. Some parties at the Post Office Creek are getting some very scily black-looking gold, a specimen of which I will forward you as soon as obtained." The Auckland journals mention the death of a militiaman by lightning said to be the first instance of the kind in New Zealand. The following are the particulars :—": — " Jas Noble, a privat" in the Ist Regiment of Waikato Militia settlers was sitting down in a little wooden house, formerly used as a fowl-house. One of his comrades, who was standing about ten yards from the house, saw a flash of lightning, and heard a report like that of a cannon. He ran to see what was the matter, but was deterred from going in by the strong smell of sulphur, and burnt flannel, or feathers, with which latter the place was strewn. He called to his comrades for assistance, and with them he entered the house, and found the deceased lying on his right side. They carried him into the open air and found that he was quite dead. The stream of electricity had entered the left side of the base of the neck, scorching the clothing, and passing through the internal organs of the body, and thence out at the right leg. Blood issued from the right eye, owing to the sudden shock the poor fellow had received. The deceased was a steady, respectable man, about 30 years of age. This is, we believe, the first death by lightning reoorded in New Zealand," The Auckland papers oomplain that the volunteers sent up from Otago have been dispatched in unsuitable vessels. The " New Zealand Herald" of the 30th ult. says :— " The Govemmeut Agent at Dunedin appears to us to make the most wretched arrangements for the conveyance of these volunteers hither. A short time since, some forty or fifty arrived in Auckland, after a twenty-eight days' passage, in a pigmy coasting schooner of some forty or fifty tons. Subsequently a small cutter named the Alpha, took her departure with five and forty, but putting back through stress ot weather, a number of the men refused to proceed in her, and about twenty of them were transhipped to the Lord Ashley, There are fifty more on board the schooner Albatross, whioh took her departure from Dunedin some d^ys before that of the steamship. To the Albatross, a remarkably fine and powerful schooner, we can have no reasonable objection. But if the services of those volunteers are considered to be of conse- , quence to the colony, we cannot but think that it js, an imperative duty to see that the men are put on board vessels of such dimensions as shall insure their health, comfort, and speedy conveyance. To take up any drogger that may offer is altogether unpardonable." We may offer as an explanation, that had not the men referred to been dispatched when they were, the probabilities were that three-fourths of them would have deserted and gone off to the Taieri rush x which at that time was just made public. On the 28th ultimo* the Champion Belt of the New Zealand Volunteers was presented at Nelson to Mr N,. G. Morse, of the No. 4 Company of N.elsqn Yolu.nteera. Captain Lockett, Adjutant qf Mijitia and. Volunteers in presenting the belt, aaid « In the absence of Colonel Richmond, commanding in this province, I have been requested by the Adjutant- General of Militia and Volunteers to present you with the New Zealand Cham' pion Belt. This wilt distinguish you as the best shot amongst the whole Volunteer force for the present year, and it must be exceedingly gratifying to you that your efforts to obtain this honor have been so successful. It is also a source of pride to, the whole of the Volunteers iv this pro- : vince, and especially to the members of your own company, that the Champion Belt has been retained in Nelson, for two conseoutive years. I trust that you may again be successful on the next occasion, and thus earn your right to retain the belt, and hand it down as an heir-loom to your child ven. The year 186,3 has proved a successful one to you, for you have not only won the Volunteer Champion Belt by gyour awn skill, but the celebrated mare Ladybird, winner of the New Zealand Champou Race, in the' same year, was also bred and reared by you. I also congratulate the Province of Nelson, for so -remarkable an occurrence that both horse and man belonging to Nelson, should prove themselves to be Champions in the same year. Regratting extremely that our worthy commanding officer, Richmond, C,8., is not here to present you this prise, I have- now- th,e nonour to hand the belt to you. The successful Champion for Volunteer honors acknowledged the belt in suitable terms. The weekly meeting for practice ot the Philharmonic Society was held on WedneAlay evening, at the Assembly Rooms, Princes street. There was a large attendance, and the advantage of practice was manifest in the improvement that has taken place in the choruses. We believe it is purposed to give the Oratorio of the Messiah on Christmas Ere.

! We learn from the "Argus" that('lntelH- ; gence reached Melbourne by the Great Victoria >. . which has given a quite new value to what remnins of the flock of alpacas lately brought to the colony. They were but so many vamab'e animals imported whence any number like them could be brought. Now they form the only fl.-ck in the world outside their native mountains — if we except the few scattered specimens acclinm- : Used in Europe and New South Wales— and cannot be increased by future importations. We need scarcely remind our readers that the importation which has already arrived in the Ju!Li Farmer, through the instrumentality of Mr Duffield, was obtained only in virtue of a sptm}. '■ privilege granted to that .gentleman, by 'tho Bolivian Government. That privilege is now at an end; and no more can come. BytheGve.it , Victoria was received intelligence of the publication of the following decree, which we translate from the " El Comercio " of Lima, of Bth July .— " In consequence of the recent exportation from Cobija of 300 alpacas, a decree has been published prohibiting the extraction of more, under pain of transportation and a fine of 500 dollars ahead for each animal. The following is the decree, published in the official " Gazette ":— "•Jose Mario Acha, Constitutional Preside-.it of Bolivia. " ' Let it be known unto all men, that the Congress has decreed and we publish the followiue law :— "'national assbmbi/y. extrvordisary. " ' Article, the only one. That the extraction of alpacas be and is now prohibited, under the penal ticsot confiscation, a fine of 500 dollars a head, and all other penalties established by the contraband laws. " • Communicate this to the Executive for its publication and fulfilment. " • Hall of Sessions in Ornro, 16th June, 1863. "'PoiiiCARPO Eyzaqcirrk, President. Samuei, Aciia, Secretary. Antonio Calderon, Secretary. (The Grand Seal.) ' " • Palace of the Bupreme Government in Oruro, June 17, 1863. " ' See that this be executed. '• ' Jose Maria Acha. Melohor Urquidx, Minister of Exohequer. We command all the authorities to observe and carry oat this decree.' " (Signed aa above. It would seem, from the date of the above decree, that immediately after the Julia Farmer left Cobija, the port whence the alpacas were shipped for Melbourne, no time was lost in rescinding a degree obtained by Mr Duffield and his friends, entitling them to take 1500 of these animals from Bolivia. This course, we are led to believe, waa brought about by the clamour of the people, headed by various political leaders opposed to the present President, who, to secure hia own popularity, called a special meeting ot the National Congress, for the sole purpose of passing the above decree. Those wretched South American Republics are seldom or never heard of except in connexion with some outrage on humanity, civil strife, repudiation of their debts, or other forms of breaches of faith with those who have been unwise enough to trust them." Mr Justin Ayltner, officer in charge M'tniine* rikia gold field reports on the 28th November last :—" Several parties on the Manorbum and Manuherika rivers, who have for some time been engaged in cutting extensive water-races, have now completed, and the prospects obtained have fully satisfied them that they will be well compensated for their labor and outlay. From reliaole information, lam in a, position to state that out of one claim a division of upwards of L2O per week per mau was obtained ; and from Ll2 to Lls per man is a usual weekly 'return. Claims are now being eagerly sought after, and there is little doubt but what a large population will eventually settle down in that locality." We have received complaints from some respectable citizens in Dunedin that an inexcusable incivility has been exercised on the part of the police in enforcing the order that people should not stand about at the corners of streets. It is quite necessary that every precaution should be taken to keep tho public thoroughfare clear, but a certain discretion should be exercised by the police in the execution of their duty, aud care should be taken that townsmen of known respectability should not be insulted while itt pursuit of their business avocations. Mr Justin Aylmer, officer in charge at the Dunstan, under date sth December says.-—Dur-ing the last week the weather has been exceedingly fine, and towards its close the heat tins been excessively oppressive. On the 3rd instant, in the absence of Mr Warden Robinson, I visited the neighborhood of the Kawarau and Kirtleburn, for the purpose of settling some water-race and other mining disputes ; on which occasion my journey in that part of the Dunstan district extended to the top of the Pisa range, upon the north and western sides of the aforesaid rivers. The miners in these localities are engaged in some very extensive works, which chiefly consist of sluicing and tunnelling under the banks on either side of the Kawarau river, between the township of Cromwell and its junction with the Kirtleburn. The latter description of mining I find to have been of of a very remunerative kind for some months past ; and as the distance increases to which these tunnels have been driven from the river, the increase of gold is found to be progressive. The value of these claims having lately become known to miners who beiore held claims of different descriptions, and less remunerative, has induced many to betake themselves to this kind of mining, notwithstanding the dangerous nature of the loose gravel through which they have to drive, without timber. The Nevis still continues the centre of attraction to miners returning from other gold fields ; and from infor-* mation received from packers and miners who have returned to this township from that river, it would appear that the population are upon tka whole well repaid. In the Manuherikia district, mining operations begin to assume a more brisk appearance than they have shown for some time. The flat in the neighborhood of the junction of the Manorbum and Manuherikia rivers, has lately been found highly auriferous, and yielding remuneration to some 200 minere.' Mr Warden Broad, writing from the Upper Shotover on the 28th November, states that « prospecting paddocks have been sunW on, the beaches which are now rendered workable by the diversion of the river,Jand with perhaps oneor two exceptions the ground is found to be aa expected very rich. The gullies and; hills adjacent to the Camp at Maori Point are being either worked or prospected, and it ia my decided opinion that as the river claims become worked out, payable* if not rich alluvial diggings will be developed on the terraces and hill sides. The want of water would be a great drawback to working such claims at present, but I imagine that this impediment would not exist in the winter season." Mr Warden Hickson in his report of the 28th November last, speaking of the Arrow District, says—" Since the abandonment of the township flat on account of the want of appliances, a number of persons are zealously endeavoring to raise a company, for the more efficient working thereof. This, in my opinion, is the only way ia which it can- be done, and I hope soon to inform you' of their setting to work. Accounts are very good from the Twelvemile.Braokcu's, and up the Arrow River, where sluicing is carried on with uuabated vigor. Gold is still coming in in fair quantities. The weather is exceedingly warm, and the rivers are slightly rising." By advertisement in the "Provincial Gazette" of the 9th inst, tenders are asked for by the Chief Surveyor for furniture, repairs, and alterations to the Survey Office. No fewer than eleven bachanalians were brought up and fined at the Police Court on Wed. nesday, some of these were new arrivals who celebrated their landing by over imbibition, and had a lodging at the station ■ house, for which they paid 20s next morning. ■ Applications were received at the Land Office, Dunedin, between the 18th November last, and the 9nd of this month, both inclusive, for 752 j acres of rural laud^There.jire eight applicants, the smallest »bkj^.,m^arGs^ acres, and tho largest, 150. t made at the Waste Land BoattrapHße^^itagaih,- on Tuesday, the 15th ot this nionti^F^!- " - \ - Persons through whose properties roads have been taken, and who are consequently interested ia any alterations contemplated in them are by advertisement in the « Provincial Government Gazette," requested' to " communicate -at °' v 9n<» with the Secretary of public worksr. f .'t v^' f ; -^'■■■— i — ■■■■.■ . —-. i t 'j. l Time.— Be avaricious of timej d.Q not gfve any moment without receiving its' vaJuQj only allow the hours to go from you with as tiftfjkhfegget as yougive to your gold; do not aUciv?«s^ie day-tofpa^.frith-out increasing the tre^ur© et;youV- knowledge and

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18631212.2.17

Bibliographic details

News of the Week., Otago Witness, Issue 628, 12 December 1863

Word Count
9,156

News of the Week. Otago Witness, Issue 628, 12 December 1863

Working