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THE RACE FOR THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS.

(From the Saturday Review.)

The race for the Two Thousand Guineas, if not in other respects very gratifying, did at least afford to those who cherish the honest prejudices of Britons an agreeable spectacle in the downfall of the reputation of that tenible LYench invader, Hospodar. This horse has been king 1 , or rather tyrant, of the market all the winter. The performances of Saccharometer last year were nearly, if not quite, as good as Hospodar's, but for some unexplained reason he did not obtain the same confidence. Ihe rage for Hospodar was only coniparnb'e to that which is excited among women by a new French fashion. Not only the pub lie, but the owners of other horses, seem to have acquiesced in the assumption of his invincibility There were eighty-five subscribers to this race, aud only nine horses started for it. The reason for this remarkable disproportion could only be that owners had made up tluir minds that their horses had no chance whatever, and, therefore, they did not think it worth th"ir while to run them over ground which, for want of rain, had become unusunlly and dangerously hard. If there were not some special reason to account for the paucity of the field as compared with the largeness of the subsc iption, it might be thought the English raciug-world was nfllicted with a plethora of money and a dearth of first-cla^ horses But, in truth, there was something like a general agreement to surrender the Two Thousand Guineas quietly to Hospodar. and to think- it lucky if it did not appiopriate the Darby also. The defeat of this foivnidable champion of France was sufficient to make memorable a day which, in other respects, was I oppressively common-place.' Besides Hospodar and Saccharometer, almnsfc the only horses backed before the race were Blue Mantle, and the winner, Macaroni. The former made so good an appearance as a, two-year-old nt Ascot, that expectations were at that time entertained of him which have since been considerably modified. It b greatly to be lamented that Blue M.anfle was not laid up alter Ascot, instead of being made to run eleven races within the year. The prevailing eEtimate of Macaroni may b a . inferred from the odds against him for the Darby, which were 50 to 1 previous to his victory of last TwsJay. The public opiuionof New market, which, as regards horses trained on the spot, is bettor informed than that of England generally, did, take Macaroni's measure pretty accurately beforehand ; at least, if that public opinion was fairly represented by a pcr*on of professional aspect, who was heard to say, while thn horses were being marshalled for the start, that *if anything bowled the favorite over it would be Macaroni.' It was a pity that th« Erophejy, thus unpretent ; ous'y delivered, could not aye been heard by somebody whom it might huva encouraged to improve slightly on the offers which were being made against the favorite. The principal known fact in Macaroni's favor was, that he had run well at Newmarket a fortnight before, when the ground was nearly as bad as it. haa been this week. These performances are gre.it proofs of soundness ; and although the Djrby course is verydiflerent from the Two Thousnnd, and weather and other circumstances may alter greatly between the two events, the easy winner of the one can scaicely fail to take a forward place in the other. There must surely be somewhere other hoives fit to dUpute the great prize with Lord Clifckn ; but ir is difficult to guess whence they are to come. Saccbavometer proved himself able to run, which was more than was expected of him ia sonic quarters; but he did not push Macaroi i vciy close ; and so far ns Mich a tost cm 1» relied on the* race for the Guineas s-hows that he would be behind Macaroni in the Derby. There wero, besides iheso two horses, only seven other" starter^ of whose pretensions it would be extravagant to talk seriously. The third in the race was Baron Rothachild's KiDg of the Vale, and it would require very

ardent faith in his owner's fortune to make a favorite of him. Thsi c was Lord Gkugow's roan colt, to which he has given the punning name ot Rapid Rhone." It m y suffice to say of him^ that tVe second part of his name i 3 much more obviously ajplicnble than the first. This horse and his elaeilr other, who ran in a race for four-year-olds on the same day, may be best described by saying .hat gentlemen look at them and think that they would make sp'endid hunters. There were, howerer, peison3 who believed that Rapid Rhone was not destitute of all chance, and, therefore, ons ran ui.derslmi'l why he started. As Lord Glasgow, if he starts one hor^?, usually starts two, the presence of Rapid Rhone aecunts for that of his stable companion CLrinr. Besides Blue Mantle, who hns be?n already mentioned, there were two other start c rs, viz. Melros°> and Count Cavour, The former being ihe only r g prtsentative of Scott's stable, may hnve been si;nte<. to get what is calle.l 'a, line ' without the mo:-t dv - taut idea of hi 3 success. The latter was protmbly employed to do the tame office fcr the stable which ia training National Guard for the Derby. The experiment did not come to much, for Count Cavour was the first beaten of the lot. The reputation of National Guard has depended prrncipa'-ly on his running with Hospodar last year, and now that Hcpodar's reputa ion i 3 demolishe.l, it seems to^ follow that National Gnad has not much character to stand upon. However, the horse sometimes occupies the fourth or filh place in the returns of the Derby b9tting; and looking ab all the information that is before the public, he is as any other known competitor. The total result of the merits of the eighty-five entries for the Two Thousand is such as to render seasonable the announcement lately made by Admiral Rous, that the breed of English race-horse 3is improving simultaneously with the great increase in the number bred. One fact, however, ought sot to be left out of sight. There is, doubtless, a growing disposition to bring out promising horses for the chiei handicaps rather than for the great three-year-old races. Owners cannoi be expected to forget, as the public sometimes seems iuclined to do, that they are entitled to do as they like with their own. The breeder of a ; first cla^s hoi se mny po^ibly prefer the praise of being one who does gooi by stealth. Without any attemptol or intended mystification, ha may either not be fully alive to the merits of his colt, or he may choose that those nieiits should not be publicly discussed for a year before the event for which principally he has bred him. A very remarkable instance of this modesty or reserve was afforded in the case of Tim Whiffler a year ago. After the Two Thousand had been won by the ftfarqufc, ths question debated everywhere in anticipation of the Derby was whether The Marquis or Buckstone was the better horse. Caracfcacus having- won the Derby, hia name was of course added to the other two in forecasting the issue of the St Leger, and when Caractaous broke down there were again only two names in everybody's mouth. But when the season of 1863 wa3 over, there was a very general agreement that Tim Whiffler was the best three-year-old that had come out in it. Something of the same kind may possibly occur again ; and theref re, if it should be questioned whether, with the exception of Lord Clifton, the Derby will exhibit any great improvement on them— it will still be permissible to hope thai this is not all the country can produce by way of equivalent for the vast sums spent on horae-raoing. ; It must have been a grand moment for the rin«when the cry of * Hospodar is beaten ' arose from tl 0 spectators of Tuesday's race. The popularity of Mi Naylor, who owns Macaroni, has always been very great and well deserved, but certainly it never reached so high a T,oint aa upon his defeat of the French favorite, Mr Naylors jockey, Challoner, has had some fine opportunities, which he his used skilfully. Besides good luck in Mr Naylor's? colors, he happened to be disengaged for the last St Leger, through his first master having no horse fit to fnn for it, and so liß got a winning mount npon The Marquis HospoJai* was ridden by Fordham, to whom fortune seems to deny nothing except success iv the greatest races of the year. Perhaps his turn, is now almost come, for it was understood last autumn that he was to ride Lord Clifden for tho Derby If Lord C fdeu comes up to his proiaise'of last season, he ought to win the Derby without much riding, but afier the downfall of Hospo.lax pubiio faith in favorites will be somewhat unsteady.

It was at one time hoped that this week's meeting at Newmarket would huva been marked by a contest of unusual interest for the Whip. This trophy is now held by Sir Joseph Hawley, who owes it, along withmany other honors, to that mn'guificent horse Asteroid, an animal which may ba recommended to the notice of those who fear that the British racer is degenerating into a speedy t-crew. Asteroid is so very good a horse that it is to be feared he will some day find favor in the eyes of foreign breeders, who will give almost any money for first-rate English stock. The race for the Whip would have been over the Beacon Course, which is nearly four miles and a quarter long. Ths weight carried in this race is 1 ) stone, whatever be the ages of the horses running for it The only challenge offered to bir Joseph Hawley was by Loid William Powlett, the owner of Tim Whiffler. At Doncastcr, inthe autumn, Tim Whiffler gave Asteroid an indisputable beatiug. But although Thn used to care little about weight, it would be going far to start on even terra* over a loner course with Asteroid, who is a year older, Accordingly the challenge has been withdrawn, and thus the whirligig of time has brought revenge to Asteroid. Another striking example of the chances of the turftwas seen about a fortnight ago, when The Marquis was beaten at Newmarket by a French mare, Stradella, having never before known defeat except in tlu Derby.

The Partition op Poland.— Some twenty years before the dismemberment of Poland, this disgraceful act was foretold by Lord Chesterfield, in letter COCIV., dated December 25, 1753, commencirg with ' The first squabble in Europe, that I foresee, will be about the Crown of Polaud.' The leading data of the fall of Poland will show how far this predictioi was real i«ed. Poland was di-raembert d by the t'moeror of Germany, the Empress of Russia, and the King of Prussia, who seized the most valuable ten itorii sin 1772 The Royal and Imperial spoliatois, on various pretexts, poured their armi s iuto the country in 1792 The brave Polc3, under Poniatowsld and Ko^uisko, several times contended against superior armies, hut in the end were defeated. Then followed the battle of Warsaw, October 13, 1748, and Suwarrow's butchery of 30,000 Poles, of all ages and conditions, in cold blood. We can scarcely believe such wholesale attrocitie3 have b^en perpetrated by Europeans within seventy years of the tiina we are writing. Poland was finally partitioned and its political existence annihilated in 1795 The transaction, in its earlier stngo, h detailed in the 'Annual Register' for 1771, 1772, and 1773, supposed to ha\e been written by Edmund Burke, Professor Sraythe sayj, diffidently : — ' Af er all, the situation of Poland was such asa'm'o*t to afford an exception (p?rhaps a single exception) in the history < f mankind to those general rules of justice that are so essential to the get at community of nations. I speak with great hesitation, and you must consider the point yourselves ; I do not profess to have thoroughly consiJered it myself.' -(Lectures on M.dern History) Sir James Macintosh contributed to the 'Elinburgh Review h valuable paper on Poland.

King and Queen Parties. —ln a New Orleans letter in the Grenada (Miss ) Appeal, the writer says : — " Our winter has, for 6ouie of our population, beeu quite a gay one ; ertain portions of them have haeu so far cairied away by the attentiou of the French, English, and Spanish officers, that th»y have absolutely imitattd the Northorn fashion of lionizing, ami lionized them t~> their heart's content, though, I fe;V, to the discontent of their purses. I absolutely blu h to sty it, butthi3 winter King nnd Queen pirti'shave been all the rjge. In thase pirties the King alway'a pays the expenses. One or the other of the captains of the foreisrn ships hns always been chosen King, and for that honoi- has paid all the expenses of an entertainment given at the hou-e of smne one lady, she always receiving any credit tint wight bo attached to the party, and escaping all the expense."

A fool si fello-v once in compai.y with a *' frie> <1" referred to the life of Nebuchiylnezzar, ond a^gu tl that it was utterly absuid and impossible for a mnu to so forget Ills human instinct*, and eat grass like a bea?t. Having stated his views, he ask?d the opiaiott of the Quaker, who had hitherto taken no pait ia tlio conversation. " Verily, friend," answered the Quaker. " f see no improbability in the story if he was as great an ass as thou." During the performance of a burlesque on " The Peep o' Buy," at the New Adclphi Theatre, Liverpo >1, Miss Elton, an uctrets who represented the character of Ann Kivanagb, fell from an artificial eminence on to the stage aud fractured both her legs. The poor gid is ia a dangerous sTtto, anl if aho recovers will bo for ever incapacitated, for following her profession. •'-.''■. Numb ks and Exodus — Dr Milman^it^is said, was as-ked the other day, by a. high- dignitary" isf'titoa Church, his opinion upon >BiShop ,<tolenßQ-y<wisnT; work on the Pentateuch. "■ The dean saiU^fi#inpfe>p appeared to be very well up in >' Numbers/-* but^ffiftt •he did not sosm to understand ' ExddusV - "--' :n *•>

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Bibliographic details

THE RACE FOR THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS., Otago Witness, Issue 608, 25 July 1863

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THE RACE FOR THE TWO THOUSAND GUINEAS. Otago Witness, Issue 608, 25 July 1863

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