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TOKOMAIRIRO.

(from tuu duly times correspondent.) Tokomairiro, June 21st, 1562. The shock of the earthquake, on the night o.f tho 12th instant, was distinctly felt by a number of persons in tins district. The eclip<e of the moon on the same evening appeared to great n-hant<ige. A vacancy in the representation of Bruce County (of which Tokomairiro forms one of the most important portions), has been caused by the death of the late lamented representative, Mr. Kettle. (Japtain Baldwin is, I understand, likely to be a candidate for the vacant seat. The practical knowledge of the requirements of the gold fitlus, and of the alterations which are needed in the present Gold Fields Act, ■which the jiallant Captain has acquired as Commissioner at YTaitahuua, points him out as likely to prove an eminently useiul member of the Assembly, should he be returued. In addition to this, Captain Baldwin is a lluent and practised speaker, and a man whose social position would at once command the attention and respect of the House. I have not as yet heard of any other probable candidate, and as far as the electors of Tokomaiiiro are concerned, I do not think that any opponent could make a very successful canvass, as they appear perfectly satisfied at the prospect of being represented by one' so well qualified for the task as the gentleman in question. Two sittings ot the Resident Magistrate's Court have baen held hero during the week, but thore were no cases of importance at either of them—the most serious case being that of a man from the Woolshed, who was sentenced to fourteen days hard labor, under fhe Vagrant Ordinance, for indecency with intent to jiisulc a female, with whose husband he had just been fighting. It would be a great boon to the inhabitants of this district, were it proclaimed a district under the Slaughter House Act, and mi Inspector of Slaughter Houses appointed. At present there are two slaughter yards in the midst of the township of Milton, which are a source of considerable annoyance to the neighboring residents, especially, as but little attention is paid to their cleanliness.' The appointment of one of the police stationed here as Inspector would remedy this evil, and would put a stop to tho present indiscriminate mode of slaughtering cattle. As matters stand now, there is no check whatever on killing cattle; no notice has to be given before doing so, nor are the parties under any obligation either to keep au uiTount of the brands, or preserve the hides of the hearts slaughtered. In fact, nothing in the world would be easier for any one so inclined, than to go on to the run, and drive off and kill ns many beasts as he wished. By at once destroying the hides, detection would be rendered impossible, and when the beasts were missed by their owners, their disappearance would in all probability be ascribed to ths

There is also an immense number of unbranded cattle on the run, tmd of course, with these, there would be still less fear of being discovered. That things of this kind have not been done already, is creditable to those who hare had every temptation to doit; but as thelooked-for rush nextspring mavnot be tjuite the little millenium which people seem to expect, it would be as well to remove all temptations to crime. Wo will probably have sufficient of it, without holding out a kind of persuasion tor its commission. Apropot, how is it that none of our legislative geniuses have done the same kind office for cattle that they bare for

sheep, by hiving a registry of Brands ? Stieh an institution is a consummation devoutly to be wished for by all nwi en of rattle. The ureailful state of the road for some miles on each side of the Taieri Ferry lias compelled the proprietors of the coaches to discontinue the runuiiy of a coach dhvct, and now one coach cornea as far n& tlio Reliance ilutel, whaie the passenger and mails are conveyed by boat to Clarendon, and there met by auother coach. By this arran^mcnt the worst part of the road is avoided, although, in stormy weather it causes the coaches to be rather behind, as it is difficult to get up the "Waihola Lake when there is a BJii' wester blowing.

The public cemetery in this district is in a most shameful state, something parallel to the condition of the old cemetery in Dunedin a few years ago. It is quite unfenced, and the cattle wander over it at pleasure, while the palings which surround some of the graves afford most convenient places on which to kui<* the bridles of hoises, when there is a public meeting or anything of that son at the adjacent school house. Sometimes a restive horse nearly pulls the paling down altogether, and some of die graves are quite unprotected. Affairs at the Woolshed are still in " confusion worse confounded," and rows of all kinds are of daily occur: e-ice. The materials for the erection of a Po» lice Station there, were s>ent up from Dunedin, but when they were unpacked it was- discovered that a considerable fioriion of the timber was non e*t inventus, so that the erection of .the building could not be proceeded with. The miners talk of getting up a petition for the appointment of a government staff there, and its being proclaimed a Goklfield. The supply of water is a. frightful source of disagreement. Captain Baldwin, for a considerable time past, has been in the habit of coming over from Waitahnna occasionally to settle disputes, but, as he pos-esses noauthuiity to enforce his decisions the Woolshed not being within his jurisdiction, he was of couise sometimes placed ii a rather unpleasant position, and it is not, therefore, to be wondered at if he has discontinued his visits there, and left them to settle fieir disputes as they boob ua-'i. The township of Milton lias lately received an accession to its numbers in the shape of a Watchmaker and Jeweller, and a Photographic artist.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OW18620628.2.15

Bibliographic details

TOKOMAIRIRO., Otago Witness, Issue 552, 28 June 1862

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TOKOMAIRIRO. Otago Witness, Issue 552, 28 June 1862

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