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EUROPEAN INTELLIGENCE

TO tITUNE 16th. We copy the following from the Melbourne Argus and Home News : — The month has been marked by events of I an interesting and varied nature. The Queen's birthday — her thirty-eighth — was celebrated on the 21st ult. in the usual way — a holiday in the public offices, a partial illumination in the evening, and the indispensable accompaniment on such occasions — feasting and drinking. The Grand Duke Constantine, of Russia, paid a flying visit to Her Majesty on the 30th ult., at Osborne, Isle of Wight, where he was met by Lord Palmerston, Lord Clarendon, and other members of the Cabinet. The visit being a strictly private one, no attempt at display was made. On Sunday the royal party had a cruise a few miles out to sea ; and early on Monday morning the Duke left our shores on his way home. It is no secret that he turned his visit to France to the best account, in the way of collecting useful information ; but his brief stay with her Majesty could

scarcely} affbrd=.him/much room, for gratifyinghis inquisitiveness. The Ist instant was the Derby day; and everyone in London- who coul& : muster sufficient time' and money adjourned to Epsom Downsj to witness,, as- Lord. Palmerston phrases it,. "GucOfethmiam Games." To- tell you that, "Blink Bonny 1 * won the race: would not give youisuch; ai good idea of the disappointment of: the "knowing- uns,'" asi if you, were made, aware.ofr the. fact, that the result took, every one.; by surprise,, particularly the members of the. ring* some of, whom lost large amounts; The adjournment o£ Parliament during the Whitsuntide holidays has slightly interrupted the course of legislation ; but. as no one anti- • cipates great things, from this session, which Mr. Disraeli and his organs insist is a "* wasted year," the public, feeling on; such interruptions does, not rise much above that of indifference. The Lords have had a good; deal to. say regarding the Divorce Bill, which they are about to send down to. the Commons, on. leaving whom the opinions may be^ hazarded that there will be some difficulty in tracing the parentage of the measure, so. much, is it likely to be altered and amended. The Bishop of Oxford tried hard to stamp some of his peculiar High Church notions upon the bill ; but even the Lords- hate Puseyism. The official announcement in the Government organs of both England and Prussia of the approaching marriage of the Princess Royal i imposed upon Parliament the duty of testifying its loyalty, and of making pecuniary provision for " England's eldest daughter." The Ministerial proposition, which, to say the least, is not a very extravagant one, was, that a marriage portion of £40,000, and an annuity of £8,000 should be granted. Mr. Roebuck suggested that a round sum — a generous sumshould be. given by way of dowry at once, and have done with it; but his proposition waf withdrawn, and it was thought that entire unanimity prevailed. On the bringing up of the i report, however, on a subsequent night, Mr. Coningham, with singular bad grace, moved that £6,000 be substituted for £8,000. The motion was seconded, but on a division it found only fourteen supporters, in a house of 342 members. Mr. Coningham, the new member for Brighton, is a fearless, independent, and promising politician ; and it is a pity that his first onslaught on our expenditure was not made on the estimates, a reduction in which, after all, must be the grand source of retrenchment and decreasing taxation. The Attorney- General has obtained leave to bring in two bills, the provisions of which are ta.make fraudulent breaches of trust liable to ] be .-punished as crime, and to remedy the evils of ;the existing law for winding up the affairs of joint-stock companies unable to discharge their pecuniary engagements. Those two measures are avowedly introduced to meet the defects Avhich recent disclosures showed to exist in our criminal code. Had Mr. F. Peel been returned to the new Parliament the House would not have been privileged as it was the other night, when the army estimates were proposed by Lord Palmerston himself. Sir John Ramsden, Mr. F. Peel's successor as Under Secretary of "War, not having mastered the details of his office, | the Premier relieved him from his duty ; and although such statements are generally regarded as disagreeable necessities, yet the. veteran statesman, with a tact peculiarly his own, completely secured the attention and arrested the sympathies of his hearers. His speech was comprehensive, clear, well arranged, conciliatory, and graced with those finishing touches which Lord Palmerston so well knows how to apply. A considerable increase on the present year as compared with the average charges of peace establishments ; but who could resist so much grace and enthusiasm ? The " economists" were nonplused, and showed by their conduct that, however willing they might have been formerly to "strain at a gnat," they were then quite prepared to "swallow a camel." Even that self-consti-tuted guardian of the public purse, the pugnacious and incorruptible Williams, was partially disarmed— Coningliam had scarcely a word to say ; and it was only as the Palmers* tonian influence died away that anything like fight was shown. Several grossly mismanaged affairs, such as Aldershot and Netley Avere challenged and exposed ; but ultimately the i supplies Avere voted. It is Avorthy of remark that Lord Palmerston A-vas Secretary at War in 1 809, when a similar duty to that of moving for the supplies devolved upon him. Since that time the world has been revolutionised, and all the then existing monarchs have been laid in the dust ; but that Avonderful man still lives, and his increasing years seem but to give him additional tact for the discharge of his varied and onerous duties. He can, when occasion requires, throw into dry details a freshness, a vigour, and a youthfullness of touch which his speech when moving for the supplies fifty years ago certainly did not possess. The undaunted Mr. Spooner again brought forward his Maynooth motion on the 20th ultimo. Immmediately the hon. gentleman got on his legs the House became almost deserted. His own party forsook him, the Government opposed him, and poor Spooner was left in. a most helpless condition. The division, which took place unexpectedly, and without a debate, showed a majority of 34 against the motion. Another politico^religious question— * the abolition of ministers' money in Ireland— which has been repeatedly before Parliament, and as repeatedly ignored by the then existing Governments, has this time met with signal successs. Mr. Fagan introduced it Lord Pal-

• merston patted it. Lord John Russell took it by, the hand, and although.it' was opposed 1 by all the weight- andi eloquence of the- Opposi-. tion chiefs, was carried by' a-, large- majority. Edinburgh has taken encouragement- fromi the success of Mr-. Fagan's. motion* and it: has* resolved to make one more effort toget rid of its annuity. tax{. which, is? analogous to the ministers' money of Ireland,, and been quite as , fruitful: in, religious discord. 1 The' Evangelical party in the Church of England, under the sanction of the Bishop of London, have commenced a series of Sunday evening sermons, in Exeter Hall. To judge by the attendance, the plan promises to be productive of great gQod. As might have been expected, however, it was proved too much for the susceptible nerves of the High Church or Puseyite party, who dread the touch of anything' uuconsecrated. Accordingly, the matter was brought- before the House of Lords the other night by Lord Dungannon. Both the Bishop of London and the Archbishop of Canterbury defended the practice as legal and expedient. The Surrey Gardens continue to attract their 12-,000 or 15,000 persons every Sunday morning to listen to Mr. Spurgeon ; and Exeter Hall, in the evening, has now its 4000 or 5000 to hear the Gospel from the lips of Close, M'Niel, and other worthies in the Church. The grievances under the head of " The Civil Service Superannuation" have been much before the public of late, but there is a prospect of their being shortly remedied. Since the institution of the system of deduction from the salaries of those in the civil service, a sum of .£900,000 has been collected, and out of this the State has repaid only ,£82,000. Room enough for reform surely ! Mr. Roebuck has given notice that on Tuesday (to-morrow) he will move a resolution with the view of abolishing the office of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and allotting the duties of Irish administration to a fourth Secretary of State. The Chief Secretarj'ship for Ireland has at length found a recipient in the person of Mr. H. Herbett, M.P. for Kerry. The appointment had been offered to Mr. Charles Villiers and to Mr. Henry Fitzroy. Mr. Stuart Wortley, owing to protracted illhealthy has been obliged to resign the oifice of Solicitor-General. Mr. Keating, M.P. for Reading, is Mr. YTortley's successor. He has just been re-elected, on the occasion of his assuming the important post. At the dinner of the Royal Literary Fund the other day, Judge Haliburton (" Sam Slick") returned thanks for "The Literature of the Colonies," and in doing so took the opportunity of making- some remarks on American society, which, „were not very complimentary "to the Yankee's. The learned gentleman tells us that there is no freedom of opinion iv the United States, and that no man dare, under pain of being Lynched, give expression to i thoughts contrary to those of the majority. 1 Justice Haliburton's speech, coupled with the reports which are being constantly brought over of the scramble for place under the new Administration, does not give a very flattering insight into the internal economy of the Union. Intelligence from the "West Indies of the capture of an African slaver reveals the fact that notwithstanding all the efforts and sacrifices of England to extinguish it, slavery is carried on as vigorously as it was half a century ago. The abolitionists are, of course, up in arms ; and they reasonably ask. what the authorities have to show for the amount annually absorbed in what has hitherto been regarded as the suppression of the nefarious traffic. The various treaties which we concluded with Spain, Brazil, and all the other countries interested in this refined occupation, are now discovered to be nothing better than Avaste paper ; and, whether we avow it or not, the fact remains that we have been duped, our money wasted, and our impotency declared before the world. A new educational movement is to be inaugurated in the course of a week or two under the presidency of Prince Albert. The object is to devise something of a practical nature out of the various phases of the educational question before the public — to consider the results qf the alleged early removal of children from school, and to deliberate on the systems of education pursued in other countries. The committee comprises names connected with every section of the Christian church. Both the Church of Scotland and the Fx-ee Church General Assemblies, have terminated their proceedings. In the former it was almost unanimously decided to lodge a protest against Lord Palmerston's Oaths Bill. In the latter some discussion took place relative to the proposition for a union with the United Presbyterian Church, the desirableness of which union has been a good deal canvassed in Scotland of late. The Roman Catholics claim to be relieved from their alleged political grievances by the Parliamentary Oaths Bill. A deputation headed by the Duke of Norfolk, waited upon Lord Palmerston on the subject ; but his Lordship plainly told them that he could not comply with their request. The Daily News says that General Williams has accepted the Governorship and Commandin^ Chief of Malta, in the room of General^Sir W. R,ejd, resigned. Active steps are at last being taken against the manager and directors of the defunct Royal British Bank. Cameron, if not secured is under surveillance, and his capture is certain. ;^A . reward of .£2OO has resulted in the apprehWLj. sion of Humphrey Brown. There is every prospect of those worthies being in a short time

the boon companions of- Sir John Dean Paul, Strahan, and Bates. A fire of great magnitude occurred on the evening of the 9th inst. on the premises of the ■well-known carriers, Pickford and Co. situate at the Camden Town Station of the North Western Eailway. The value of the property destroyed is estimated at £250,000. The railway company and Pickford and. Co. are insured to the extent of £55,000. June 16. Sir F. Thesiger's amendment on the Oaths Bill, that the words "on the true faith of a Christian" should be retained in the Parliamentary oath, was negatived last night after a lengthy and interesting discussion, hy 34 to 201. Sir John Pakington, Mr. Disraeli, Lord Stanley, and other Conservatives, voted with the Government. In the House of Lords last night the report of amendments on the Transportation and Penal Servitude Bill was brought up and agreed to.

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EUROPEAN INTELLIGENCE, Otago Witness, Issue 301, 5 September 1857

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2,176

EUROPEAN INTELLIGENCE Otago Witness, Issue 301, 5 September 1857

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