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THE SPORTING WORLD

May 10, 1916. BOXING. Memories of other days are recalled by the presence of Frank Slavin m our midst. Oldtimers will recall how the Australian visited England m the eighties, and met Peter Jackson m a contest at, the National Sporting Club which was memorable. He subsequently went to the United States when the Klondyke " boom " came along, and he was one of the hardy pioneers. Though Slavin is now over 50 years of age, he is still a tougih proposition, as some German may have cause to know before very long. The one-time champion, who is now m London, has be.en giving his views on boxers of the present day to a representative .of ; the 'Weekly Dispatch.' Slavin says-. "'The', science of boxing has sadly deteriorated^ since my clay. True, I do not take the same interest m the game as I did m years gone by, but when called on to referee a bout between two fairly well-known men m Canada about three years ago I was astonished at the amount of hugging and wrestling which went on. The main feature of boxing, as I had beeu taught by Larry Foley, seemed utterly unknown to these boxers." This opinion, as expressed by Frank Slavin, bears out what the writer of these notes has so frequently expressed— viz., that many of our boxers (of whom Billy Wells is a notable example) lack aggressiveness and the ability to hit, with the result that they are frequently knocked out by punchers who are inferior boxers — from a scientfiic point of view. — A Reversal of Form. — The match between Young Symonds, of Plymouth, and Tancy Lee, of Scotland, created no end of interest m the Devonshire town, where, the home man was fully expected to repeat the victory which gained him the. fly-weight title, only, however, to lose it to Jimmy Wilde. It was known that Leo had shown excellent form whilst training with Young Rosuer recently, and there were more than a. few of his countrymen who we're prepared to see their man take the spoils. Thus all looked bright for a determined contest, and such it proved, victory seeming to hang m the balance for many rounds. The coditest progressed on very even lines, and it was difficult to say which was on top at the end of the sixth round. After the eighth, however, Symonds showed signs of weakness, though he frequently i rallied. It, was Lee's turn to hang out signals of distress m the twelfth round, and Symonds made such an effort that he ap- i peared likely to end matters m his favor. ' Lee, however, got over his bad time, and the pair continued to battle on m the gamesfc possible manner until the seventeenth round, when Symonds retired. He was not knocked out, but virtually exhausted, which was the cause Of his retirement. Thus ended a remarkable contest, and one of the keenest ever seen m the western town. ATHLETICS. Military athletic meetings proved a big at- ! traction to many sportsmen on Saturday, one of the best being the fixture carried through at Sutton Verney, and at which several well-known London athletes were prominent. Much was naturally expected from C. H. ■ Ruffell, an ex-English steeplechase champion, and winner of the last National Crosscountry Championship. To the general surprise, however, ho could only '" run up " m the "half" and "mile,"' these events goin to Lieut. R. D. Walker, R.E., and Rifleman Hickey, London Irish, respectively. It subsequently transpired that. Ruffell _ had broken down m training, and was afraid, to go all out. Another well-known competitor . m Capfc. A. H. Moncrieff. of the London A.C. and Surrey A.C., accounted for the 41 quarter " after a good race with his brother, Driver M. Moncrieff, A.S.C. The programme included a six-mile crosscountry race, m" which Private Callard, R.A.M.C., proved successful, beating Cor- „ poral B. H. Lymberg, 20th London, by j' 62sec. The latter, is a well-known London ! athlete, H,which points to Callard being smart, j Both he and Hickey, winner of the "mile," I are new men, and one of the most pleasing features of military sports is the manner iv which fresh talent is being discovered. — Overseas Cracks. — ■ Home athletes were naturally interested m ; the result of the annual Boston Marathon Race (which fell to a local runner m A. V. ' Roth). It was a bit of a shock to learn that Jim Corkery, of Toronto, winner of the London Polytechnic Marathon m 1914, had finished fourth. His numerous English ad- ' mirers naturally wonder why he is not with ' the patriots m the fighting area, seeing that he is fit to take part m a Marathon race. Another overseas crack m Jack Donaldson, of Australia, the ex-professioual sprint champion, has just signed on to play for the Swinton Northern Union Football Club next season. This hardly looks as though ho is going to follow the example of his great, rivai, W. A. Applegarth (who beat him for the championship), aiul take a hand m pro- ; {■ecting our womenfolk from the German savages. Somehow, one expects famous athletes to bo m the fighting) line, and it is a bit disappointing to come across any who have not fallen m by choice. : THE TURF. The first two classics have led to surprises, the biggest being* the 1 oyerthrow of Fifinella m the One Thousand Guineas. Mr Hulton's filly, on the strength of last season's form, was generally regarded as the best of thi3 year's classic animals, the daughter of Polymelus-Silver Fowl starting an odds-on favorite for the event under notice. It was v good> race, Rickaby, on Canyon, getting fir&t run on Fifinella, whereby Lord Derby's crack gained an advantage. Childs called on ' Fifinella for a final effort^ and the favorite ; made a good response, closing the gap to i some extent, but Canyon had something left, i and passed the post with a lead of threequarters of a length. The time for ths ! Rowley mile was lmin lOsec, toy no means wonderful. [Fifinella subsequently won the New Derby and the Oaks.— Sporting Editor, E.S.] Clarissimus occupied lmin 39§sec when winning the Two Thousand Guineas. The defeat of Figaro m this race was • another facer for backers of favorites, but it is said ! that Mr L. Neuman's colt as hardly yet fit, so that the Derby may show considerable alterations m form. ■ ' . ' . FOOTBALL. The strength of Welsh Rugby was ably illustrated during the match between South J Wales and the South African infantry at.' Swansea on Saturday. The home side soon gained a lead, a penalty against the South Africans m their own twenty-five resulting, hi Jack Bancroft kicking a goal before the same' had been m progress three minute 1 ?. Later on Tom Ponsford registered a try for the Welshmen, who thus held a frad'of o points on crossing over. The South Africans j mado big efforts on resuming, and at length Sergeant Bassett crossed 'he line The 'Welshmen were soon pressing again, however, n.nd more tries came from Beuyon and To;n Morgan, the home team finally winning n capital geune by 12 points io 3. Seven of the players who turned out for South Wales are. entitled to wear the uniform of honor, so that it was a real military match. The Soccer, season was- brought to a close on Saturday, when many big charity fixtures were .promoted. One .of the chief was between the Arsenal and a team selected from other London combination cfcibs, the proceeds being given to tho widow of R. W. Benson, who was taken ill cluringi a match on the Arsenal ground last February, aul died m tho dressing room. The wretched weather marred the success of. the venture io some extent, nevertheless nearly £200 was •raised for the fund. The game itself was most interesting, as after Lieutenant Rholey .had. given the "Rest"' the lead, Bradshaw scored for the Arsenal, and so made a draw of it. - CRICKET. ' When May arrives footballers give way to-, cricketers, and the summer game will be lirsfc. favorite during the next five months. A. capital win "was gained by^ the 2nd Artists RiiFes over the Essex Club at Leyton on Saturday. Batting first, the Artists, scored 250 runs for live wiokets before de-. clariug, Cadet Taylor playing a splendid

innings of 110 not out. He was batting an hour aud three-quarters, and bib- all round the wicket. The Essex batsmen fared badly against Cadet Maingot, who took six wickets for 58 runs, the total stopping at 87, of winch 37 were obtained by 2nd Lieutenant C. V. Thompson, recently home from the tront. Another interesting match was played at Lord's Ground, where "A" Squadron of the Royal Horse Guards beat. "C " Squadron. Quite the feature of the, game was the splendid bowling of Corporal of Horse Quigley and Trooper Spay, each of whom performed the "hat trick" by taking three wickets with successive balls, so that " C " Squadron could only make 22 and 20 m their two innings m response to "A " Squadron's first effort of 84. IN GENERAL. • Falkiner, receiving 1,750 points from Gray m a match of 18,000 up. was 1,474 points to the good when the . halfway stage was reached. Among the Cambridge University athletes who have passed m pharmacology and general pathology for Part 11. or' the surgical and medical examination are G. A. Fisher, P. C. Livingston, and B. F. Arniatage. The first-named, who is a lieutenant m the Ist King's Royal Rifles, has been twice wounded and mentioned m despatches, and he rowed bow m the 1913 Cambridge eight. Livingston, who hails from Vancouver, is also a taleated oarsman, whilst Armatage (a lieutenant m the R.A.M.C.) represented Cambridge m the thres miles at the intervarsity sports of 1912. _ Inman and Newman are having a fine struggle m their billiard match of 18,000 up, the latter with a start of 2,000 points. When the halfway stage 'was reached Newman still held an advantage of 1,585, co that Inman has a stiff task before him. Sergt. H. Godley. 2nd' South MiddlesexBrigade Field Ambulance, killed m action m Egypt, was a well-known figure m Buckingham sporting circles, and during his military training he took part m a boxing tournament at Wolverkampton, and scored a handsome victor;/. #

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THE SPORTING WORLD, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 583, 25 July 1916

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THE SPORTING WORLD Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XII, Issue 583, 25 July 1916

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