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THE SPORTING WORLD

LONDON, March 2,

ATHLETICS

In- spite of wintry weather, many hardy athletes enjoyed a road run on Saturday. One of the most important events was an intercompany race at York, held under the auspices of the Northern Command Cross-country Association. It should have been six miles, but the promoters wisely reduced it by two. Tvvo officers finished first and second, but passed on the gold medal offered for the winner to the next man. The happy relationships between officers and men m most of our regiments are due to actions like this, and. it is no wonder the wheels go smoothly. Another big race was decided m the London district, where A. H. Nicholls, the international champion, won easily from W. Hughes,- an Irish international.

- — Great Athletes Gone. —

It is with much regret that one has to write of the death of Godfrey B. Shaw, Lieutenant A. R. Welsh, and Lieutenant JR. E. Atkinson. All three were Cambridge University men, though Shaw failed to gain his Blue. Early m his career he went to New Zealand, where he won the 120 yds hurdles championship at the Dunedin Meeting of 1887. [Harold Batger subsequently beat him.— Ed. E.S.] Returning to England three years later, he made an attempt to win the English hurdles championship, but found Dan Bulger, of Ireland, too good for him, though he came into his own m 1893, 1894, 1895, and 1896, his time m the latter year being 15 4-ssec Shaw also went to New York m 1895 as a member of the London A.C. team, but was beaten a- yard by Stephen Cha-sfe, the young Vermofft farmer, who won m 15 3-ssec. It was a fine race, and it seems but yesterday that the writer watched the tall American and the stocky Englishman come up the course at Manhattan Field, though Shaw was never able to close the small gap which Chase opened up m the run to the first hurdle. Lieutenant Welsh did great things when at Rugby School, but on going up to Cambridge had the hard luck to be m opposition to Henderson Hamilton, the great Oxford miler, who beat him at the intervarsity sports of 1905, the latter creating an intervarsity mile record of 4min 17 4-ssec, and this m March. Welsh did the distance m 4min 19sec, and won the following year m 4min 21 l-ssec. It is sad to think that both these great athletes have been killed m the war.

Lieutenant Atkinson, killed m recent fighting, came out* first as a ten-miler, but he found out m 1914 that the half-mile was his forte. At the Cambridge 'Varsity sports that year he won the half and mile, doing lmin 58sec m the former. Then., came the intervarsity meeting, •when he had to meet Nofman^Taber, of America, who m a paced attack on record at Boston last August did 4min 12 3-ssec. The American was much fancied, but made a poor response to Atkinson's determined spurt 220 yards from home, the Cantab winning by 10 yards m lmin 56 2-s&ec. Atkinson ran faster still at the championships m July, when he finished five yards behind Homer Baker, of New York, m lmin 54 2-ssec, A. F. Hill, the four-mile champion of 1910, dividing the pair. — Athletes Honored. — Several well-known athletes figure among the soldiers who have recently heen decorated by the French Government for meritorious conduct. Among them is Lieutenant Harry Green, the famous little stayer, who won the big London Marathon race from Windsor Castle to Stamford Bridge m 1911. Subsequently he created a string of amateur records from 21 to 26 miles, which will take a lot of* beating. BILLIARDS. ■ The younger players have again taken the honors m this season's big London billiard tournament. Tom Recce (scratch) and C. Falkiner (rec. I,2so' points) met m the laffk heat, and though the former got within 300 points of his rival during the final session, Falkiner came away again to win by 813 points. Thus Falkiner, Smith, aiid Newman tie for first place with four wins out of five, whilst Recce, Aiken, and Harverson have won one and lost four heats. Newman comes out best regarding the average for the whole tournament with figures of 44.50, Smith 42, Aiken 40, Recce 39.50, Harverson 34.50, and Falkiner 33.50 following as written. '

Smith shows the way m the matter of big breaks, he having exceeded the century 122 times, with 700, 525, and 1 509 as his best efforts. Newman has 121 centuries to his credit, with 623 as the best, whilst Falkiner's 113 of over the century include breaks of 575 *nd 508. Newman made an indifferent start m his match against Inman, the latter conceding 2,000 points m. 18,000 up. The scratch man got within 300 points of his rival at the fourth session, but Newman then found his form, so that he held an advantage of 2,632 when the halfway stage was reached. It is a new experience for Ihman to be outpointed during the first half of a match when he is conceding a big. start, and he may be depended on to make a great effort to alter the look of things before the finish.

FOOTBALL

Yorkshire •sportsmen were greatly interested m a Northern Union match at Hull on Saturday, when a local team met an Australian side. The visitors included Lieutenant Ingram Moore, D.C.M., and Corporal Keyser, V.C., and the party were entertained by the Lord Mayor and given a jolly good Yorkshire welcome. A wet ball, and .the strange Northern Union rules, somewhat handicapped the Australiansj so that they were only able . to score two tries to four by the home men.The visitors managed to convert theirs, however, so that the margin was only 12 points, to 10 m favor of Hull. N Several Temarkable results were seen m the soccer world on Saturday. The meeting between MillwaU and Fulham, the joint leaders m the London combination,' 'created much interest. After each. ha4|fi?cored a goal, one of the MillwaU players was injured and forced to retire. Thus handicapped, the home team could notjnold the Fulham men, who added six mor«s*fgoals. Curiously enough, Tottenham Hotspur also ' Scored seven times when at home'?£o Liiton, but as the country team got f<jjiir goals, the _ 'me w.is not altogether one-sided^ The^ defeat^ of 1 Mil iwall leaves Fulham as the^only teaWiin the combination with the highest possible number of poinK

BOXING

In the cours^pf conversation with Sergeant Billy Wsfis at the National Sporting Clul^.last the writer suggested to the beavy r Wi6Jght champion that he was a sjMniii" rather than a stayer, and that he would probably win more contests if he made-up his mind to put everything into three or four rounds. Wells remarked » " Why, that is what I used to do m India, and I nearly always knocked out my rivals." It is a certainty that Wells has lost some of his contests through paying heed to his " advisers' " shouts of "Box him, Billy." That may be all right if the other fellow was content to box for points, but when up against a puncher, who wades m and lands a knock-out blow when Wells gets tired and slow, is another matter. This

conversation came back to one's mind when Wells cut loose m the second round of his contest against Smith, and ended matters m the next round. Possibly Wells " will try the plan again, and if so he will go far. Harry Reeve, of London, now wants a match with Wells, but the writer can hardly fancy bis succeeding where Smith failed. A real fight was seen during the 20---rounds' contest between Henri Tyncke, of Belgium, and Eddie Feathers, of Haslingden, at the Ring, on Monday. The Belgian tried hard for a knock-out, but the home man was too clever for him, and gained the verdict at the close. IN GENERAL. It came as something of a surprise to see Jack Donaldson, of Australia, the exsprint champion of the world, winning a half-mile handicap at Manchester on Saturday. Mr A. H. Wehner, an officer m the 12th Lancers, rode his horse Piper's Hill m ,the Herefordshire Steeplechase at the Colwell Park meeting, and shaped very well considering his want of practice. He has been on duty from the start of the war, and took part m the wonderful retreat from Mons, when a small British force successfully held from five to twenty times their number at bay m a rearguard . action which saved the French army. j Jack Johnson has been asked by the authorities to leave England, and he will be sailing for South America this week. The big boxer says he is going to get '£10,000 for meeting an unknown at Buenos Ayres, and thinks his rival must be Sam Langford. Smyth and Reardon, two talented Xai tional Hunt jockeys, will have to go up for military duty next week. Billy Wells came near having to cry off his engagement to meet Smith, as he was concerned m a motor smash a few days before the match, but fortunately he got off with a shaking.

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Bibliographic details

THE SPORTING WORLD, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 570, 25 April 1916

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THE SPORTING WORLD Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 570, 25 April 1916

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