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THE SPORTING WORLD

October 28. ARMY ATHLETICS. The formation of the ATdershot Military Sports Association ensures that Ave shall have a busy time among our Army athletes during the next feAV months. It is proposed to promote cross-country running, relay-racing, sAvimming, boxing, football, a tug of Avar, bayonet fighting, bomb throwing, and miniature rifle shooting. In every case the events Avill be open to teams or indi\ r iduals from platoons, and Avhen the champion platoon of a battalion has been found, it Avill next take part in the brigade competition, and then go on to the division and command competitions. This Avill lead to all-round form, and mean that almost every man in a battalion will take part in one or the other sports named. RECENT RACING. The military meeting at Lee on Saturday proved a benefit for the Irish Guards (Third Battalion). Captain Greer A\*on the quarter, and also formed one of the Avinning team in the relay race. In addition to this, Sergeant Murphy Avon the 100 yards, and the five-mile cross-country race also went to the Irishmen, who had eA'ery reason to feel elated. There Avas another Irish day at BlackdoAvn, where the Southern Counties' Cross-country Association promoted a fivemile race open to the Irish Nationalist Division. This ended in a triumph for the Bth Royal Minister Fusiliers, the team from D Company getting 10 men home in 35min 25sec. The Avinning team included Lieutenant J. C. 0. Dodd and Sergeant J. Hughes, two Avell-knoAvn members of the Surrey A.C., and their assistance naturally counted for much. It may be added that it Avas the first appearance of the battalion at Aldershot, and as the 2nd Battalion, now at the front, hold the Aldershot Command Championship, the Munsters Avere very delighted. NEW WALKING RECORD. It came as no surprise to hear that George Goulding had Avalked seven miles in 50min 40 4-ssec at NeAv York on Saturday. This will become the new world's record, being lOsec faster than G. E. Lanier accomplished at Stamford Bridge in 1905. Some of my readers may be aware that Goulding in an Englishman, hailing from Yorkshire, though he has resided in Canada for some years. He competed, at the Olympic Games of 1908, and though defeated, learnt much. He was a different proposition at the Stockholm festival in 1912, when he Avon the Avalking race from Webb, another Englishman, and satisfied good judges that he Avas not only a very fast Avalker, but pne of the fairest Avho ever put on a shoe. Webb is an ex-soldier, and Lamer is a policeman, whilst Bridge, the present champion walker of England is a postman. Thus three prominent champions have qcrved the Empire in an official capacity, and it is not yet too late for Goulding to follow their example, if he is not already doing so. BOXING. Following the defeat of the fly-Aveight champion (Taney Lee) Ave had another crack in Sergeant Johnnie Basham going under. The manner Basham deprived Johnnie Summers of his Avelter-Aveight championship belt, and. subsequently held it against Matt Wells, sent his stock soaring. It therefore carne as a big surprise Avhen he failed to stay nine ror-ds against Albert Badoud, - a man' Bo "-.m had twice defeated. Basham's f* *;e against the Swiss is attributed to th: Vet that he had not properly recovered from an influenza cold, and .it soon became evident that he was not in condition to do himself justice. Badoud has promised to gjVe Basham another -chance, andi when the soldier has had a rest he hopes to turn the tubles. On, the strength of his win oyer the champion of England Badoud is claiming to be the welter-weight champion of Europe, but Sergeant Johnnie Summers and Sergeant Tom M' Cormick are anxious to dispute the title with him. , Mention of these cracks is a reminder of the number of boxers now in the Army. Starting at top , (heavy-weight) Ave have Sergeant Billy Wells, Sergeant Dick Smith, Corporal Pat O'Keefe, Private J. Sullivan, Sergeant j. Basham, Sergeant J. 'Summers, Sergeant) T. M* Cormick, Sergeant 'Jim Driscoll, and many others lesser knoAvn. The ■ prominent British boxers who have not yet " fallen in " include M'Goldrick, of Scotland, Dennis Hough, of Ireland, Youn«* Ah earn, the Anglo-American, Fred Welsh" of Wales, and Kid Lewis and Matt Wells' both members of a race found all over the Avorld, No doubt they have good reasons for not yet having "joined up," but they will gain_ many more admirers when they don khaki. BILLIARDS. . Stevenson managed to beat Inman in their last match of 18,000 up, Avhich partly atoned for three previous defeats at the hands of the champion. The Hull man appeared to' have made sure of victory in J the recent match, when he compiled a i Avonderful break of 994, Avhich is his best with ivory balls, under present conditions, though he has ono of 1,016 with composite balls to his credit. Here it may be pointed out that the record with ivory balls is 1,134, and it stands to the credit of G. Gray. Inman Avasi not discouraged Avith his rival's big effort on Friday, and gradually drawing up he was only a matter ' of 502 behind Avhen the final day's play opened. Stevenson made another nice break of 410 on the last afternoon, so that lie was 774 to the good Avhen the evening session opened. Both men Avere quite out of touch during this, Stevenson particularly so, though he ultimately ran out the Avinner by 286 points. , . FOOTBALL. There was a general "shake-up" in League games cn Saturday, three of the leaders experiencing defeat for the first time this season. Chelsea met Avith a first l-everae when visiting Queen's Park for a London combination game, the home side scoring the only goal of the match. MeanAvhile Millwall and Brentford played a draAv of three goals all, so that Chelsea kept the lead, MillAvall and Brentford each being a point behind the Stamford Bridge team. Manchester City no longer shows the Avay in the Lancashire section of the League, a visit to "Overton ending in a 4 goals to 2 defeat.* 1 'This first reverse led to an alteration in the leadership, EA*erton's better opal average jbringing about a change, though both clubs claim 12 points for eight matches. Notts County had a narroAV escape in the Midland section, a visit to Grimsby resulting in a draAv of 2 goals all. Leicester Posse gained » pronounced success 1 (4-0) Avhen at home to Leeds City, and ' with 10 points for seven games 1 is only , 2 points behind Notts County. The lead- [ ers, however, enjoy the distinction of being j the only undefeated League club .in England or Scotland. | Having Avon eight successive matches, it ; Avas naturally expected that Celtic Avould | prevail Avhen at home to St. "Mirren on i Saturday. The Paisley team' shoAved exI ceptional form, however, and by scoring tAvo goals without response gained the

honor of being the first to lower the colors of a club which is still able to put the full team which won the championship of Scotland last season into the field, .in spite of the urgent call for fighters. Though Celtic lost an unbeaten record, the club is an easy first in the League table. THE CHAMPION CRICKETER. The death of W. G. Grace at the age of 67 robs the cricket worid of its greatest personality. It is -io idle claim to assert that "W.G." did more to popularise the game than any player who ever lived. Nor is it wrong to term him the finest allround player tae game has produced. He was a champion "at the age of 18, and kept in the front rank for 35 years. When he was a mere "toddler" W.G. was taught cricket by his father and uncle, a very decent pitch being laid out in the orchard of the family residence near Bristol. It is lelated that the whole family, including mother, daughters, and maid, the boy who cleaned the boots, and the three dogs (fielders) were often to be seen enjoying a game, so that cricket was a standing dish at the Chestnuts. In all he made 126 centuries in first class cricket, and considering that the pitches during most of his career could not be compared to the prepared modern pitch he stands an easy first among batsmen. It may also be pointed out that "W.G." was a good runner, and hurdler in his youth, and he also Arent in for hunting, shooting, bowls, and golf. TKtE TURF. The weights for the Free Handicap confirmed the good opinion the Avxiter expressed about Fifijiella last Aveek, Mr Hultons filly being gi\*en top weight. Ayn Hali and Figaro received .31b, and Telephone Girl gets Bst 51b, Avith Argos (the Middle Park Plate w'nner) 21b further down the scale. Pommern oi.ly had three rivals to teat in the Lincoln Slakes, and the manner in Avhich Mr S. Joel's each performed his task further enhanced his record. To run one mile and a-qua.rter in 2m iii 7|sec with 1341b in the saddle is a fine performance, and the Derby and St.. Leger Winner is evidently a -eal (1/er. Silver Tag justified the good opinion of tho public in the Cambridgeshire, the favorite Avinning from another well-backed animal in Mount William. Although the winner only got home with a head to spare, Donoghue considers the filly really had something in hard, as she ran lazily. Mr Hulton certainly owns two exceptional fillies in Fifinella and Silver Tag, and as Telephone Girl scored in the NeAv Nursery Stakes under top Aveight fillies have been very much to the fore of late.

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Bibliographic details

THE SPORTING WORLD, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 556, 18 January 1916

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THE SPORTING WORLD Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 556, 18 January 1916

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