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THE SPORTING WORLD

November 4. THE TURF. It delighted ithe- sporjtsmen who ait- , terded the last day's flat racing at Nevrmarket to cheei 1 the success of Friar Marcus m the Queensberry Handicap. The King's racing colors have been under a cloud, this fjeason, and the victory of tho colt came at an opportune time. Most of my readers will nemember that Friar Marcus won the Middle Park Plate a year ago s and he was the ruling favoritefor the Derby during the winter. When i efforts were made to train him, for the dis- j tance, however, it was found that he lacked staying" power, and all hopes of a ' classic win w«re soon abandoned. The season was %yell advanced when the son of Cicero — Prim Nun gained winning brackets, and hi© latest success makes one hope that he will do well during the 1916 ■season. He was only i*eceiving 81b from Hornet's Beauty m the Newmarket race, and that famous sprinter was only able to get fifth m a field of 22. Predictions often go wrong, but should the King's colt prove the champion sprinter of 1916 the writer will not tie very surprised. — A Patriotic Jockey. — Herbert Jones must have given a sigh of relief when he weighed m after riding Friai* Marcus to victory. He had to reduce himself by fully a stone to make the weight, and that must have been a trial indeed. He was delighted to win, and rsniarked: " I rode the King's first winner and his latest to date. Now I am. going t.-> fight for him." The decision of Jones to join the Army is m keeping with the. action of most other jockeys who are big enough t.o serve, and those who have not yet donned khaki will no doubt profit by the example. Jones was an unknown stable lad at the time Diamond Jubilee was carrying the late King Edward's i*acing colors. The colt developed a bad temper, and no one could ride him, whereon it was decided to convert him into a gelding. Someone then suggested that as hia stable boy appeared to be the only human being he was docile with he might be able to ride Jiim. The experiment wa3 tried, and not only was Diamond Jubilee saved for stud duty, but he also won the Derby. Jones rode Minoru to victory m the Derby of 1909, and the display of temper by Diamond Jubilee did the gtable lad some good. — Some Figures. — With so many valuable events dropped, and others with modified stakes, it is only natural to find the amounts opposite winning owners much less than usual. The success of Laniu6 m the Jockey Club Stakes sent Mr L. Neumann to the head of the list vith a record of seven wins, worth £13,546. He is followed by Mr S. B. Joel, with five wins, and stakes of £11,336, Pommern's four wins bringing m £11,200 alone. Mr J. B. Joel is third with £9,876 for 21 wins, a big falling-off from last/ year, when he showed the way with £30,724. Mi' C. Peck just managed to beat Mr P Gilpin for pride of place among win.ning trainers, the former sending out seven winners, which secured ;13 races worth £15,299, whilst Gilpin's winners wort £15,114.

Stephen Donoghua is an easy first amons jockeys with 61 victories out of 372 mounts, F. Bullock 36, F. L. Rickaby 35, and M. Wing 32 coming next. Pommern already mentioned, is the biggest winner of the year; and Polymelus is at the, top of the stallions' list, his family having Avon 16 races to the value of £17,738. ■ f ■ ■ MILITARY iATHLETICS. ; ,

Two noted athletes figure m repent military ne#s. Arnold Jackson, .the 1,500 metres. Olympic champion;, TiaS been promoted to a captaincy m thp „ Rifle- Brigade, and W, A-. Appfesarth, another gold medallist at the last. Olympiad,, has, enlisted 5n the Ist Surrey Rifles. : ' England has not had such & miler as Jackson ' since the days of W. G. George, and all sportsmen! hope thc'jold Malvern boy will come back safely arid show his ability m many ir-ore fine races.

How Applegarth won the last Enajlish amateur 220 yds championship m 21£ sec will be remembered by many readers. He ran the yistaiiee round the half of a quarter r m}le raZ *perf oitaaiice ■ wbichi greatly impressed.; 'sSJr- Jariies E. " Sullivan,' Arnica's great authority on athletic, matters: He remarked W flie 1 writer whe'rii leaving England: "All the best American 1 sprinters h^ye tried to run ; the furlong m 21 l+sse,c round a curved; track, but none have, succeeded:'* It w£s „&' big testimony' to ApplegarthV speed', AjicT , CQrjtaiifly, well' deserved. It was a disappointment to : maijy when Applegarth. joined : the; profes- ■ sioij^l ranks, and his/ vicEorjes over, Jacks Donfldson, of Australia, for • the ipOyd&i an^^Xlyds. world's; championship diU not: arouse much enthjiiiaam. \ If , the little Yo^kshireman deserted vEnglfeh amateurism he has risen to the occasion m a Igcpa^er ' causey and his donning of • khaki will-gain \ him many new friends. ' Hi.uv action ••.ds: all i the; jmor'e crecjitabje seeing ttat« he is mar- 1 ried;and a fathe"iv « : * ••' •<'■• ; - . "j

' J '"' '■'v'^p.x^G..; •.. v. ••■: .? Boxing is one, of . t^e sports winch lias' actually increased- in, .{aYor, and practice! since the war .siaxted. It najWlly"fits iiil with the present time, wh^'ii /fighting is'\ ;i gen^raf topje, arid soldiers and, eailorsi are the most "keen ori s th^ pastime. - - '' ' Two old rivals m Corporal Fullerton, of ; the' 19th Hussars, and Sergeant Zimmeiyi bf the Hants Regiment, came together for jthe 'seventh time m aflO-round contest at jAldershot on Monday. As each had three- i! wins to his credit, they did not 'need thejcheers of their respective friends, to make^ (them eager for victory, and the bout was' Jmcst interesting. Fullerton made big us© 1 ;of a long reach, and. he also seemed to* istay better, so that he got the decision. International fray was again the choice•dish at the National' Sporting Club this. week. A 10-round bout between C. I Braune, of Belgium, and G. Hatto, of i I Wales, was the chief item on the pro- j jgramme, and it provided an excellent con- j | test. . The rivals were very evenly matched, but the Belgian seemed to be the stronger! 'towards the end, which gained him a nari row victory. .- ■ I

: Young Jennings, of Wales, and Johnnie Best, or Scotland, /.were the principals m. another international bout. The Welsh, boxer looked a bit fitter than his rival, and as the contest proceeded thi6 became more obvious. The Scot stuck to his work, however, and though he failed to get the verdict, he made a good showing. BILLIARDS. We have had some remarkable billiards since last week's notes • were written, Recce and Newman were having a neck and neck struggle m their level match, until the former made a splendid break of; 652. which was the foundation of a big lead, and he reached the half-way stage with an advantage of 1,999 points. Since then. he 'has increased, his lead to over, 3,000, so that his victory looks assured. He was particularly brilliant yesterday, when he made breaks of 315, 516, and; 540, and he and Stevenson are the only Englishmen who have twice exceeded the 500 mark on one day since the present rules have been m force. The big break by the Oldham man was: eclipsed by G. Gray on Monday, when the Australian caught and passed Inman, who-

led by 825 at the half-way stage of "their level game. Gray scored 905 points m three visits to the table (221, 219, and 476). Following a break of 2, Gray got going again, and reached his points with an unfinished effort of 401. Resuming m the evening lie increased this to 1,001, so that he scored 1,308 points m four complete innings. This wonderful display gave Gray a four-figure advantage, but Inman has since closed the gap. [Gray won, Sports Ed. 'E.S.'] FOOTBALL. Big changes have again to be chronicled m connection with the League tables. Everton deposed Manchester- City of the top place m the Lancashire section, and few thought that the visit of the leaders to Stoke would lead to another change. The home side showed eurprising form, however, and won a fine game by the odd goal m five. The success of Brunley over Oldham (4-0), and of Southport (5.0) when visiting Preston were other notable wins. These results leave Stoke and Burnley on top with 13 points for 9 games, Everton being a point behind.

The Notts County team journeyed to Lincoln with the proud distinction of being t.he only unbeaten League club m the United Kingdom. It proved an unfortunate trip, however, as the home side put on three goals without response. Fortunately for the leaders, Leicester Fosse could only manage to draw (2-2) on visiting Hull, so that Notts County still head the Midland section table with a lead of 1 point over Leicester Fosse.

Chelsea gained a fine win (3-I), when receiving The Arsenal, and dangerous rivals m Brentford prevailed (2-1) when entertaining Croydon, so that tho Chelsea team only enjoys a single point advantage over Brentford m the London combination table.

The big match m Scotland was furnished by the meeting of Glasgow Rangers and Celtic, this drawing a crowd of 50,000. The home side had all the best of matters, scoring three times without response from Celtic. The reverse alters the 10016 of things, as, though the leaders have 16 points for 10 games, the Rangers are only 3 points behind for eight matches. IN GENERAL. Rugby men were delighted to learn that Lieutenant C. Thome had been awarded the Military Cross for gallant conduct. He is a Cambridge Blue, having played three-quarter-back m the intervarsity match of 1911. Among the wounded who recently Teturned to England was Private J. L. C Jenkins, the amateur golf champion. It is good to hear that he is not badly hurt, and his many admirers hope that he will soon be fit again. Mr W. J. Parkinson heads the list of winning jockeys m Ireland with a record of 68 victories out of 175 mounts.

Another well-known cricketer m F. H. Bacon, secretary to the Hants County C.C., has laid down his life for Empire. He was serving as assistant paymaster m the Royal Naval Reserve when he met his death by drowning.

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Bibliographic details

THE SPORTING WORLD, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 554, 4 January 1916

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THE SPORTING WORLD Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XI, Issue 554, 4 January 1916

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