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SPORTING.

The imported horse Stormaway, by Orme from Sandiway, is running m a grocer's cart m Zeehan. New Zealand-bred Pakau, daughter of Conqueror, won the Hurdle Race at Williamstown (Vie.) on the 10th, and " Terlinga " says : The Reckoning won this race last year before running second to Obi m the Grand National Hurdle Race, and it is within the bounds of possibility that Pakau may do the same. She is decidedly smart. Mr S. P. Mackay, of Victoria, says that if he had seen Full Sail he does not think he would have given £1,000 for him. A two-year-old filly by Carbine from Sceptre sold for 4,800 guineas m England last month. S. Ferguson, of Australia, rode the winner of both the Austrian Oaks and Austrian Derby for his employer, Baron Springer. The pari-mutuel (or totalisator) statistics m Fiance for 1910 show that the stakes put through were £14,980,599, being 7s 6d per head of population. The gift to charities from the percentage taken by the machine amounted to £299,611. Muldoon, a horse that Hickenbotham took to Melbourne twelve months ago to win the Cup, captured a double at Port Adelaide on the 10th. He is by Hymettus from the New Zealand mare Ideal. At the Australian Trotting Club meeting at Victoria Park (N.S.W.) on the 6th inst. the Flying Mile Handicap produced a mile record, put up by Roley, who won m 2min 17isec. R. L'ameivn, who steered Trafalgar to victory on more than one occasion, tried liis hand at hurdle riding this month, and won the York Hurdle Race at the V.R.C. meeting on Norley, who went out favorite and won easily. Apellon, who won the Great Northern Champagne Stakes m 1910, is again m work at EUerslie. Tlie Grafton gelding Grafnax. who last season won the V.R.C. Grand National Steeplechase under 11.12, has been given 13.5 m this year's event. Bribery comes next with 12.8. The Reckoning heads the lint m the V.R.C. Grand National Hurdles with 11.13. After him come Kulcnrna 11.11 and Sparkle 11.9. Pakau has 10.3, a handy impost. "Sir Bedivere" says that so far the only distinction gained by Labor Day, who is entered for the New Zealand Cup. lies m the fact of her having succeeded m kicking Koran rather severely ar. the pair were doing a gallop on the Waverley course. Doubts are expressed as to whether Te Arai, the" 'chasei, will stand another solid preparation. " Glencoe " reports that Winchester struck himself rather badly when contesting the Wanganui Steeplechase, and this is the reason why he luv> not been nominated since. The St. Crispin gelding is, however, on the mend, and will be nominated at Trentham and Riccarton. The V.R.C. taik aoout reintroducing telling races. Strong- opposition is already anticipated, for thc-e events gave rite to flagrant abuses. An important motion to come before the Racing Conference is one by the Stipendiary Stewards' Committee, whicli is as follows : — "Stipendiary stewards shall be appointed by the New Zealand Racing Con- ! ference, or by the committee thereof nomii nated for that purpose, and with such powers and subject to such regulations at; may from time to time be conferred or approved by the conference." When submitted last year the motion was put on one side for the time being. After the Newmarket Stakes, Mr Corlett wrote : Mr Joel, it ie well known, staj>d.sa heavy stake on Sunstar at good odds for the Derby, one of hif- bets being a double event of 7.500 to 100 the Two Thousand and Derby — poor bookie! And yet, m the face of all this, he did not funk the hard ground when he had his horse on the spot and ready to run for the Newmarket Stakes. Sunstar is at this moment the most valuable three-year-old m England, but, for all that, Mr Joel said : " Never mind the ground, run." Wo love a b< Id policy, and love to see it well rewarded. The hoi*6e simply *" lolloped " m first, being one that, like Isinglass, would make a race of it with a donkey, and there was no theatrical display. " You will be very anxious when you feel his legs to-morrow morning," we suid to Mr Morton. " Naturally." was- the reply ; " but he is go sound."

Ever since the late Mr G. G. Stead practically swept the boards at .he A. J.C. Spring Meeting of 1905 with Noctuiforni, Sungod, Nightfall, and Liolt, who won among them Derby, Maiden Stakes, New Stakes, Grantham Stakes, Wycombe Stakes, Members' Handicap, and Randwick Plate, other owners' m New Zealand have been seized with the desire to go one better, 6ays the Sydney ' Daily Telegraph.' We have lost good races to Bobrikoff, Maniopc'to, Solution, Souitline, and otiieis, but no such slaughter has been registered since the time referred to, nor has anything approaching it been done. But now the time seems to be regarded as just ripe enough for a successful New Zeaiaul r.csault on the good things to be dispensed by the premier club m the com 111,4; spring. How mai.y horses are intended to represent the Dominion on the occasion referred to there is no meant} of discovering, but this much is known: that three New Zealand tiaiiiers have already arranged for accommodation [ foe 14 horses at the Royal Hot-1, Rand- | wick, and have announced their intention to put man appearance next month. Of these R. Mawn, who trains for Mr G. D. Greenwood, has ordered fiv^ b- xes ; H. Franks, trainer for Messrs W. U and G. [ L. Stead and others, claims evx boxes •, atid j R O'Donnell. Riccaiton. t'uve [ The lato Eli Jellett bought Richmond out of a two-year-old selling race at Flemington for 455g5. In the early eighties he sold him to Mr W. A. BJackler, of S.A., for as a tire. An anecdote m connection with Jellett is being :*;.,ivcd. Hales hr.d tlie mount on Richj mend m the Australian Cup, and .Jellett j weighed him out rather fine. Joe Thompson,, the leviathan bookmaker, was aware I of this, and, being one of Richmond's I big backers, ha unobserved slipped several half-crowns into Hales 's boots, to be cure of a correct weigh-in. After the race Hales got a surprise to find nearly a pound's >vorth of half-crowns m his boots, and until matters were afterwards ex plained wag m a quandary £0 account for the find. R. Mari:!!, who trained such n number of winners for King Edward, is strongly opposed to the Tod Sloan seat, and recently referred to the subject as follows : — "The present disposition to teach lads to ride at exereke m the American style is wrong m every sense. It will act against the welfare of the turf, and is opposed to the bexst interests of owners and trainers. I have never allowed cither a stable ben 7 or a jockey to ride for my stable except m the way m which 1 think all jockeys should rid.; — that is, m the manner racW were ridden m former days, when there was no dearth of jockeys. I have seeu at least 20 jockeys' m .1 weighing loom at the came time, and it mattered very little which of thoni rode your horse, j I hey wore all equally .good hoi semen and | fine jockey?, li. those day? horses were

well ridde-i, and if they were good enough they won. Nowadays one is at a great disadvantage, when the jockeys that can be put up with any confidence can be counted on the fingers of the hand. All the weight of the jockey under the present system ks on the shoulders, aud tho pressure is on the horse's mouth. The proper place is behind the withers, to take the weight off the horse's legs. Moreover, tho jockey is then m a more suitable and natural position to balance them for a final and crucial effort."

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Bibliographic details

Otautau Standard\u000d\u000aAnd Wallace County Chronicle, Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume VII, Issue 322, 4 July 1911

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1,312

SPORTING. Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume VII, Issue 322, 4 July 1911

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