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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

Feilding track was m capital order on ! the 30th November. Mr R. H. Aldworth, the club's nftwly-appointed stai'ter, gave a straggling start m the Feilding Stakes, nnd after the start for the Kiwitea Wei- \ ter, m which two horses were left at the post, a section of the public treated Mr Aldworth to a hostile demonstration. As a result, Mr Aldworth handed m his re- ( signation to the stewards, and Mr T. j Cameron was appointed to the duty. Mr . Aldworth deserves credit for thus promptly j vacating an office that did not suit him. ! His action got the club and owners out of a difficulty. Golden Eagle, winner of the Flying Stakes, is a daughter of St. Clements and Rail Rau. She won pretty j easily, but had luck m getting away with th» first batch m a bad start. Shuja, who went out first favorite for the Aorangi Hack Handicap, had all his work cut out to catch Eclogue. The winner is by Sonlt frcm Sprite, therefore half-brother to The j Imp, trained byPhelan at the Fovbury. The Lark was unlucky m getting away ; badly m the St. Andrew's Handicap, l^m, | but any way it does not seem likely that i he could have beaten Husbandman, who, ■ ridden nicely by F. E. Jones, outstayed j th"> field m the fast time of 2min 36sec, and i had something to spare at the finish. The j pievious winners of this race have been : — . 1892— Musket, 6.10, 2min 48§see. 1893— Musket, 8.4, 2min 44|sec. I 1894— Golden Plover, 8.10, 2min 42|sec. 1895— Leda, 6.13, 2min 43sec. 1896— Mahaki, 8.8, 2min 38|sec. 1897— Leda, 7.10, 2min 43sec. 1898— Crusoe, 8.10, 2min 42|sec.

1899— Crusoe, 8.8, 2min 43£ sec. 1900— Crusoe, 8.10, 2min 43fsec. 1901 — Legion of Honor, 7.0, 2min 40sec 1902— Dexterity, 7.11, 2min 40sec. 1905— Hinetaura, 8.7, 2min 37|sec. 1904 — Joe Chamberlain, 6.9, 2min 35|sec 1905— Armistice, 7.7, 2min 45|sec.

1906— Ghoorka, 8.4, 2min 371 sec.

1907— Maniapoto, 8.11, 2min 39£ sec. Oryx, who won the Hurdle Race by half a head, was the outsider of the eight starters. Gold Crest gave nothing else a chance m the Feilding Stakes. Jenkins got the good-looking chestnut first away, and he led throughout, covering the five furlongs m lmin Oisec. • It was a strong field on paper. , Provocation, the two-year-old son of Birkenhead and Stepfeldt, proved to be tli3 best of the others, and m the opinion of some present this colt will beat Broadsword again next time they meet. Ikon, winner of the Kiwitea Welter, started favorite, but they say that she was lucky to beat Sandstream. The last-named got away -badhr.

Golden Slipper lias resumed work at Randwick, so that the Multiform filly may be Keen racing again before the close of the present season. The New Zealand jockey L. H. Hewitt was on the back of Marcovil, winner of this year's Cambridgeshire, who went out at 50 to 1. The "'Special Commissioner 1 " wrote m, ' Sporting Life ' on the day after the race: — It is difficult, df not impossible, to find language m which adequately to express the amazement occasioned by MarcotrilViriumph m the Cambridgeshire To state that nobody hid a penny on the horse would bo overstepping the mark, for I believe I am correct m stating that his owner, Mr Francis Luscombe, had the courage to take £5,000 to £100, a bet that will rather 6poil the look of the layer's book. I am also told that one of the younger generation of trainers here who had a penchant for long shots had 66 to 1 to a couple of sovereigns. Apart from these two instances, I have not heard of a I !X>ul ■nHho gave the son of Marco and Lady Villikine oven so much as a thought. AU through last summer and autumn he was crippled by a leg. That, leg was still m evidence when at one of the spring 6ales • h<=re \Mr 'Lusoombe bought him for 930gs out of the batch of horses that belonged to the late Duke of Devonshire, the idea no doubt being that he shall m due course Join hisrsire Marco at the Taiga te Forest Stud. Nobody for a moment "believed that it would ever be possible to get another ! race out of him.

"Dingo" 'Richardson, who rode Clean Sweep to victory m the Melbourne Cup, Flagship m the • Willianistown Cup, Sir Foote m the Futurity Stakes, Great Scot m the Australian Cup, Sweet Nell m the Gaulfield Cup, and F. J.A. m the Victoria Derby, was drowned while bathing at'Ulmarra (N.S.W.) on November 26. "Terlinga" writes: — A. Richardson was quite the best light-weight of his time, but hedid not "train on." Unfortunately, very few of these promising young jockeys do. The lads who do go on and become firstclass jockeys are generally those who, like young Wootton, have a father and mother to look after them when they are young. Often it happens that a boy " deteriorates through no fault of his own. Ho starts lo shoot up, and grows out of hie riding. In the case of "Dingo" Richajrdson .and F. J. Dunne, the rider of <• Wakeful, Revenue, and Auros, the boys only had themselves to blame for being dropped by their masters'. They got out of control, and now both are dead. Richardson rode lightweights for T. Payten -when F. Kuhn was firetv jockey, for 'the stable. Soon after I his disqualification Kuhn accidentally shot himself, and now Richardson has come to his end through an accident. -Both T. Payten and J. Scobie had a liking for " Dingo," but they could not manage him, and /he was. reluctantly dropped. The English Jockey Club have decided that m the event of- any horse running the course from a fake start, or from a void start, the owner may, with the consent of the stewards, withdraw hi* horse from the race ; the horse shall, nevertheless, be considered.as having started. It is reported from Brisbane that 750gs .has, been Tefused for the crack northern three-year-old Flaxen and 500gs for Mentlnore.

The four-year*old -gelding Bedouin (Soliman — Queen of the Plains) has ibeen bought m England for 2,000gs on behalf of a Calcutta sportsman who wishes to be represented m the Viceroy' 6 Cup. An English writer says that, sons ofGalImnle have very. seldom figured to advantage over lon* courses, but on th© other hand some of his daughters, such as Rockdove and Hanuuerkop, have proved themselves great stayers. The 'death occurred m the Argentine ecme time back of the stallion Kendal, m Vis twenty eixth year.. Among other highclaes performers' sired by Kcndol was Galtee More, who won tho Two Thousand, Derby, and St. Leger of 1897.

The success :of ' Persimmon's stock this season will more than ever cause English breeders to regi«t ! the death of that horse. Up to October 9 twelve of hie progeny had won twenty-five races of a total value of £27,591 15s, the principal contributor to this amount being that good colt Your Majesty, with £19,286. Another St. Simon, m St.^ Frasquin, was second up to the date given with £22,709, his best winner being Rhodora, £7,380. Starters an Engliand have been empower to inflict a fine not exceeding £10 o'i any jockey misconducting himself at the post.

The sale of Mr August Belnrant's Ameri-can-bred yearlings at Newmarket m October wa© not a success. Thirteen were sold, and only tlireo reached tho three-figure mark, the highest price paid being 2logs for a- colt by Hastings. R- Woofcton gave lOsgs for a filly by the same aire. The

average was 65gs each, which will scarcely encourage American breeders to send young stock to England. It is now twenty-one years since Mr J. E. Henrys wae first appointed handicapper to the Feilding Jockey Club, so that he has attained his majority. Mr John Corlett takes Touchstone, The Flying Dutchman, West Australian, Stockwell, Blair Athol, Gladiator, Robert the Devil, Ormonde, Isinglass, Flying Fox, and Persimmon as the best eleven St. Leger winners .vi his experience of over fifty

years,

According to a list prepared by the officials of the A.J.C. there are no fewer than 2,600 racehorses m New South Wales, thirty-seven of which are returned as having been imported.

On the score that it wae injurious to public morality, the totalisator has been abolished m Japan, and racing is temporarily at a standstill m that country, all the big meetings set down for last month having been postponed.

In England permission may be obtained to saddle up horses at the po6t. The White Knight, who had lOst to carry m the Cesarewitch Stakes, was saddled up at the post for that event. The contest between the leading New Zealand jockeys for first place promises to be exceedingly keen this season, remarks the 'Post.' Hatch, with three win 6at Feilding, now heads the list with a score of twenty-three, and this rider has been engaged for so many good horses at the holiday meetings that, with ordinary luck, his score will be increased by the end of the year. Deeley got a sequence of wins at Takapuna, and presses Hatch close with twenty- one. Then follow Jenkins (eighteen) and Oliver (thirteen). Fabric, who won Sydney Tattersall's Club Cup for Mr R. Wootton m 1906, won for the same owner the Autumn Handicap Plate, one mile and a-half, at the Stockton meeting m England on October 24.

the New Zealand son of Euroclydon, won the Jumpers' Flat Race from sixteen others at the Victorian Club races on 28th November.

The Gippeland grey, Stately, who is by Majestic, won the Victorian Club Steeplechase on the same day, only to lose it on protest. In making his run up the straight m the final stage of the ra-ce Stately cut across sharply, and a protest was entered by the trainer of Jackshay. While disqualifying stately for first place, the stewards exercised their discretion, and awarded him second place.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume IV, Issue 189, 15 December 1908

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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume IV, Issue 189, 15 December 1908

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