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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

" Tattersall's " was the subject of a motion moved m the Tasmanian House of Assembly lately by Mr Ogden. His proposal was — " That m the opinion of this House the question as to whether Tattersall's be allowed to continue as at present or be abolished, pr be conducted by the State, should be referred to a referendum of the electors of this State ; and that it be an instruction to, the Government to bring m a Bill to give effect to the said resolution." The Premier opposed the motion. He said £60,000 a year revenue would be lost if Tattersall's were abolished. The discussion was continued for two hours, and the motion^ was lost on a division, six voting for it to eightjC^ against it. 'Pearson's Weekly/ writing of "«ss»ebet" men, says : Fred Archer, the famous jockey, is said to have made but one bet m his life, and that . was on a double event, and for a friend, whom _it lifted out of the mire of pressing pecuniary difficulties. John Scott's one net is historical. The noted trainer laid £I,ooo— all, the money he had m the world or could raise by hook or by crook — on his horse Touchstone at 40 to 1. The horse Von — it was the St. Leger of 1834 — and the astute Yorkshireman pocketed his £40,000, and never wagered another penny-piece to the end of his days. Captain Barclay, the piofessional pedestrian, once won after a somewhat similar fashion — only it was himself he backed — a sum of £3,000, and ever afterwards declined all wagers> even at the most tempting odds; while Harry Grimshaw's one bet, £2,400 against a dozen of champagne fforr r a treble event, which he brought off, is also a well-known case m point. Orby, the Derby winner, was enffeirin,,from kidney trouble when the last mail left Home: Slieve Gallion did not start m the Doncaster St. Leger, Captain Greer having decided that the Two Thousand yrinner should not be trained for the long-distance classic. The death is announced of Waiuku, winner of the New Zealand Oup of 1897, after a fine race with St. Paul. A rich American named Gates has signified his intention of starting a big stable m England and trying to follow the example of Mr R. Croker by winning the Derby. Mr Gates is nicknamed "Million" Gates because of his heavy betting propensities. It is stated, says "The Blade," that Boniform's withdrawal from his Derby and Cup engagements was due to an injury of the muscles covering the loins, and this being the case, a spell should bring the colt round again. . His name appears m the Canterbury Cup entry. " "Terlinga" writes: The defection of Boniform will knock a deal of the interest out of the A.J.C. Derby. Before he went wrorig 2 to 1 and even money had been takep about the little New Zealand colt. That, of course, was before Mountain King had won the Rawson Stakes. Now Mountain King is ju6t as great a favorite as Boniform was, and this despite the rumors as to his having turned musical. Mountain King is a beautiful galloper,

but for a Derby I think I would rather have Peru, provided a good pace is secured. This colt of Mr Wynne's looks the part, and the Sydney writers speak well of his peiformance m the Rawson Stakes. They also seem to regard The Owl and Maltine as more likely to shine over a short course than m a Derby. I must say I think Peru very likely to win Mr Agar Wynne his first Derby. From Sydney we hear of the death of the veteran trainer Albert Comwell. He was born on the same day as the King, and made a name for himself m his early days by training Cap-a-pie when he beat Chester m the A.J.C. St. Leger. He always 6aid that Cap-a-pie and Lord Cardigan were the best horses he ever trained, and Soldier Boy and Pet Girl the best horses he ever owned. The Avondale Guineas was won by Pohutu. The winner is by Explosion from Miss Rose by Dreadnought, her dam the St. Leger mare Miss Letty. A cablegram from Sydney advises that Welcome Trist won the Hawkesbury Handicap on Saturday. Papers to hand by Ithe mail to-day report that this colt won the principal handicap at Rosehill on the 1 21 st September. In this he carried the i minimum weight, just got up m time to | defeat by a very narrow margin Tregeare, who had made nearly all the running, and who at the distance appeared to have tlie race at his mercy. Welcome Trist is by | imported Sir Tristram from Welcome i Queenie, by Welcome Jack — son of Traducer — from Queensberry. This was Welcome Trist's first win, and his spring engagements include the A.J.C. and V.R.C. Derbys and the Caulfield and Melbourne Cups. With a penalty of 71b on w.f.a. Collarit was sent out an odds-on-favorite for the Spring Stakes at Rosehill on the 21st September m a field of thirteen. Tlie favorite was m command soon after the first furlong had been cast behind, and escorted by Lady Florence from the half mile post, beat. the daughter of Grafton. [ to whom he was conceding 211 bat w.f.s., easily at the end. Glenculloch was a red-hot favorite for the Wanganui Guineas, but finished out of a place. Runyan, who won by two .lengths, is by Pilgrim's Progress from Neva, and was ridden by W. Price. Though he paid £4 4s, Bunyan was second favorite. He has quickly come out of hack clrss. So has Irish Rifle. This son of , Musketry and Element won a hack han- | dicap on the first day, and on the second I day accounted for the Wanganui HandiI cap. Bunyan is not m. the C.J.C. Derby.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OSWCC19071008.2.23

Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume III, Issue 127, 8 October 1907

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973

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume III, Issue 127, 8 October 1907

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