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FARM NOTES.

Arrangements are well in hand foi

the, erection of a co-operative butter factory at Waipukurau, Havvke's Bay. It is a grave mistake to allow persons ill with cont.igious diseases to enter a cow-yard or dairy where milk is handled. Suppliers to co-operative dairy companies in New bouth Wales, which in some cases combine bacon curing with butter producing, are receiving an advance of 4^d for their pigs, a price which is expected to be stationary for some time. Having pointed out during a reference to the dairying industry that the exports last year were valued at £3,000,000, Mr Mackenzie says, as Minister for Agriculture, he intends to specialise in the establishment of reliable dairy herds of recognised milking strains. Experiments go to prove that heifers give better results from machine milking than do aged cows which have been used to the hand milking.

Says the " Wanganui Herald ":— The Wanganui Dairy Company is introducing a new kind of receptable for the distribution of cream from the factory and delivery carts. In the interests of hygiene the company has decided to put cream in sterilised germproof bottles made of paraffined paper, each intended for. a single service only. Though a glass bottle be rinsed ever so carefully it cannot be considered sterile nor is it germ-proof. The operations last season of the Parua Co-operati\e Dairy Company furnish an illustration ot the advantages of co-operative dairying. The dairy, which was privately owned until last season, when the settlers took it over, has paid very handsomely since the settlers took possession, and last year over ,£IOOO more was distributed amongst milk suppliers than for any previous year. The suppliers have greatly increased their herds, and, to cope with the larger supplies expected next season, it is intended to instal additional machinery.—"Northern Advocate." England is moving in the question of the eradication of swine fever. In answer to a question in the House of Commons recently, Sir Edward Strachey, on behalf of the Board ot Agriculture, stated : "We are disposed to think that the question of the continued prevalence of swine fever in Great Britain and the practicability of the adoption of further measures with a view to secure its speedy extirpation might with advantage be investigated by a Departmental Committee, and arrangements for the purpose are now under consideration."

Mr Dempsey, Government Dairy Expert, visited Taumarunui last week, and spent several days studying the capabilities of the district from a dairy ing point of view. He was greatly impressed with the large amount of country which could without much difficulty be converted into good dairying land. He thinks that there is scarcely enough grass yet in the district to keep a factory oi any size going, but notwithstanding this he advocates the immediate lormation of a co-operative creamery company and the construction of a suitable building. He believes that once the scheme were started many would be induced to take up dairying, and so make the industry a complete success in the district. Mr Dempsey considers that the establishment of a dairy factory would add from £2 to £3 per acre to the value of land in this neighbourhood. A tribute to the educational side of the Palmerston North dairy show is found in the following: — A dairy farmer from the north says he owes a lot to the National Dairy Show. At one conference he learnt much in the growing of maize, how to build a silo, and the kind of machinery to cut first-class maize for ensilage. At another conference—how to improve his farm pastures by artificial manuring. So much so that his grass shows a splendid return for the money spent on the additional food provided for stock. In another case a farmer writes : " While many of my neighbours are losing their root crops, mine are in splendid heart. The results are from spraying which I learnt of from a display made at your Manawatu winter show some time back. I hope to make a good display this year."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OG19100509.2.25

Bibliographic details

FARM NOTES., Ohinemuri Gazette, Volume XXI, Issue 2639, 9 May 1910

Word Count
670

FARM NOTES. Ohinemuri Gazette, Volume XXI, Issue 2639, 9 May 1910

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