Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image

TREASURE HUNTING.

Treasure hunting his obtained a peculiar local interest, and the phrase only has to be mentioned in order to suggest a comic hunt for a hidden prize. But thanks to the inventive genius of a clever Italian named Cavaliere Pino, certain Spanish syndicates are contemplating a treasure hunt on a vast scale —a hunt which will take the searchers into the mysterious depth of the ocean's bed. The hydroscope is the name of the instrument which Pino has invented, and by its aid it is asserted that man will be enabled to. exploit the sea's immeasurable wealth. For! centuries the waves have claimed their toll. When the waves have closed over a doomed ship her

freight, save in rare instances, has been irretrievably lost. But this great Italian inventor, with his magic glass, is able to gaze on the titter depths. Dr. Carlo Iberti, the manager to Pino, has recently been to London for the purpose of making a careful research in the British Museum, of manuscripts referring to the Spanish galleons that lie fathoms deep in Vigo Bay. "I found everything I wanted there," he said to a press representative, " and sooner or later I shall publish the story, which will j enhance the interest of the enter- i prise upon which Spanish syndicates are now engaged at Vigo." But treasure-hunting, in the popular sense of the phrase, is not the sole or even the main purpose to which the inventions are to be applied. The sea has much useful wealth to disgorge besides the

silver dollars, golden guineas, and rotting hulks that rest on its bed. "Guano," exclaimed Dr Iberti, "is something the hydroscope has located. The exact position is Pino's secret, but he has had specimens examined by chemists, who have pronounced it much more powerful than any known deposit. The value of such a discovery—in view of the ever-decreasing quantity available for the marketscan scarcely be over-estimated." Dr. Iberti then proceeded to speak of the use of the hydroscope by fishermen. " Boats now go to work in the dnrk," he said. " The nets may strike a shoal and reap an abundant harvest. But with the new invention aboard, the skipper can from his vessel's deck peer down into the dark depths and withhold his nets until he is sure of his fish. The searchers after coral, pearls, sponges, too, grope more or less helplessly after their prize. There is a bank off Japan which has produced, and yet produces, the three varieties of coralred, rose, and white—to tha worth of over a million sterling each season. But there are hundreds of other, and eyen richer, banks. These we can discover, with the result that the world's returns will increase a hundredfold. * The same thing applies to pearls and sponges. They are at present secured in most primitive and pro miseuous fashion (t is very much like the boy and the diving-tub. He may get a prize; quite possibly he will draw a blank." It is not too much to expect"that this hydroscope, if it will do what is claimed for it, will confer immense benefits in many other directions, for the sea is an unknown region, of whose vast resources we have only the faintest glimmerings.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/OG19041102.2.6

Bibliographic details

Ohinemuri Gazette, Ohinemuri Gazette, Issue 1193, 2 November 1904

Word Count
542

TREASURE HUNTING. Ohinemuri Gazette, Issue 1193, 2 November 1904

Working