Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

NEW ZEALAND AND THE MOTOR CAR INDUSTRY.

ECONOMIES OF LOCAL LABOUR. .To a gathering of press representatives recently held at the Pctouc works of General Motors (New Zealand), Ltd., Mr W. M’Hardy Forman, managing director, made statements concerning the building of the various motor cars produced by the company which arc of considerable importance to New Zealand manufacturers.

In assuming the role of* a pioneer in New Zealand motor car manufacture, stated Mr M'Hardy Forman, New Zealand has assumed a responsibility which it has not failed to recognise fully. Dependent, on the support of New Zealanders for its existence and continued growth, it, in return, has col* tributed to the Dominion’s prosperity, and that of its people, by embarking upon an intensive local purchase policy. “ Already,” said Mr M'Hardy Forman, in describing New Zealand production of motor cars, “ we’ use a considerable percentage of New Zealand materials in the construction of our cars and trucks. “Dominion-grown wool is fast being absorbed in the manufacture of New Zealand-made upholstery, and eventually approximately 33,000 yards will bo used annually. “In body building for commercial vehicles we are using miro—a native wood—at the rate of 150,000 super feet annually, and 120,000 feet of English glass will be replaced by the New Zealand article as soon as a suitable product is offered. For some time wo have been consuming New Zealand-made varnishes, glues, enamels, and numerous small parts, but other articles that should be manufactured are carpets (we use 6000 yards), top material (13,000 yards), padding (28,000 lb). We might mention, too, that much is being done by way of encouraging the colour printing trade, as all General Motors advertising literature is produced entirely on New Zealand presses. “ Another phase is the extensive employment of local labour and the training given to these local employees. Very little unskilled labour is utilised in a motor car assembly plant. Practically every operation calls for skill of tome sort in the men who do the work. As this skill docs not exist at the outset in these workers who are available when the plant opens it has to be taught them. Such instruction greatly increases the men’s capabilities, and therefore their valtie to the community at large. “ We do not need to ‘look very far to .recognise the benefits that the motor car has brought. It is no mere coincidence that national standards of living are higher in almost direct proportion to the extent that the motor car is used in our country. “New Zealanders may be well proud of the fact that their country is the third most highly 1 motorised in the world. ( r If is the ideal of General Motors (New Zealand), Ltd., to add tp the material benefits derived by the use of motor ears, the economic benefits that result from building these motor cars locally, and in contributing directly to the wealth of the country, in providing lucrative employment to hundreds of New Zealanders, in wonderfully organised sales help to its retail distributors, and in the employment of industrial methods that enable vast ecbnomjes to bo passed on to car buyers—in these ways, then is not General Motors helping Now Zealand grow V “ New Zealand should build her own cars,” concluded Mr M'Hardy Forman, If they can bo built from local materials, New Zealand industry will benefit thereby. It is a challenge to the initiative of local manufacturers.”—s/11/23,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19291105.2.10

Bibliographic details

NEW ZEALAND AND THE MOTOR CAR INDUSTRY., Otago Daily Times, Issue 20866, 5 November 1929

Word Count
566

NEW ZEALAND AND THE MOTOR CAR INDUSTRY. Otago Daily Times, Issue 20866, 5 November 1929

Working