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SPORTING.

RACING AND TROTTING. FIXTURES. May 12, 14— Egmont R.C. May 19, 21—Wanganui J.C. May 21.—Oamaru T.C. May 23—Otautau R.C. June 1,3, 4 Dunedin J.C. Juno 3, 4—Otalu-Maori R.C. Juno 3. 4. B—Auckland R.C. Juno 18—Napier Park R.C. Juno 22—Hawke's Bay Hunt Club, June 24, £s Hawke’s Bay J.C. Juno 25—Oamaru J.C. July 2—Ashburton County R.C. July 12. 14. 16 —Wellington R.C. July 21—Waimato District Hunt Club. July 28—South Canterbury Hunt Club. July 23. 30— Gisborne R.C. July 30—Christchurch Hunt Club. A rumour indicates that there is a possibility of the Oamaru Trotting Club holding its winter meeting at lorbury Park. It would bo an excellent idea il it were put into effect. There is no doubt that the fields attracted by the Oamaru programme could not bo accommodated on the local course, and the question arises as to where is the nest best 1 Tuki has been taken north by S. G. Ware to fulfil engagements at the Wanganui and Auckland meetings. Air J. Richardson has seemed a lease of Le Todd, and will train him with the object of giving himself exercise as well as with the idea of the possiblities of gaining a stake or two. Le Todd is on 1 a bad mark, and hence a bad horse to own, but there is always a chance of a good horse winning. The Great Audubon marc Great Bell joined C. Donald’s stable after the Forbury Park meeting. Chimera has joined M. B. Edwards’s stable. The dull season has set in, and although racing and trotting, like Tennyson's brook, go on for ever in this country, this is the period when it hesitates for a week or two. The crack three-year-old Cbmmendation is at present suffering from a bad cold. No housewife waiting in the early doors rush at a city store lias a keener scent for a bargain than Air Harry Taylor, of the Macquarie Stud (remarks the Herald). He paid 325gns and 375gns respectively for Cournntc and Galtco Queen, and sold their foals for 3500gns and 4100gns. Now he has received four figures for the foal of another mare that he purchased cheaply. That mare was Lais, who was bought by Mr Taylor at the dispersal sale of the Mungio Bundle Stud for lOOgns. At the time she had a Mountain King foal at her side, and the youngster grew into such a fine yearling that Air Taylor was able to sell him for 1 lOOgns. The Alacqnarie sludmaster also bought wisely at the Sledmere dispersal. Realising that the stock of Great Star would bo valuable, he pot a couple of mares that had foaia by him. For Coopal ho paid 280gns, and last week sold the foal, now a yearling, for 700gns. Alaltoff cost him SOOgna, and the Great Star colt she had at her side realised 500gns. It is unusual to hear of an offer of 4000gne being refused for a ten-year-old gelding that was given away as a three-year-old (remarks a London writer). Yet it was bo in connection with Thrown In, who at Cheltenham (England) in March won a three and a-quarter miles steeplechase, the Cheltenham Gold Cup < of £7BO He was but little fancied, starting at 1G to 1 in a field of eight, and, ridden by the Hon. H. Grosvenor, won comfortably from Grakle and Silvio. The late Fred. Hunt gave Thown In away, and he eventually became the property of Air G. Sanday, who, after winning several races with him, sold him for £IOOO. The offer of 4000gns was made from America last year. Lord Stalbridge is his owner, and the Hon. H. Grosvenor, who is that sportsman’s son, had not long recovered from a broken collarbone when he won on Thown In. An exchange reports that some attractive looking and costly yearlings arc in hand at Caulfield. . D. J. Price is educating a nice-looking brown colt by All Black from Anna, by Sea Prince from Anna Carlovna (who ran second in the Caulfield Cup won by Aurifer). This colt was bought for 600gns by Air Jonn Edmonds, owner of Los Gatos. _ The Air Edmond referred to is an old-time Dunedinite, and Price was once associated with the late Air Harry Goodman’s stable. They are still at war over the betting tax in England. Just before the last mail to hand left England a representative deputation waited on Mr Churchill, and his reply reads as follows: —“To sum up. In tho first place, it is much too early to judge the effects, and these effects cannot be judged until we have experience of the (lat-racing season; seondly, wo are not in possession of any alternative scheme. In these circumstances, I am going to ask you and to ask Panament to give the duty a fair trial during the flat-racing season, to collect all the figures and factsthe Jockey Club will collect nil the statistics of attendance —and I shall be ready to receive any information, confidential or otherwise, that your representatives may wish to give showing the effects which actually take place. Then, after a few months, we con see exactly what tho effects of tho tax are, when it has had a fair trial. It is far from tho intention of the Government to do a permanent injury to sport—wo have cverv desire to avoid that—and from that point of view our interests aro not at all opposed to yours. What I strongly urge and strongly advise is to givo the tax a fair trial over the flatracing season, or a large mrt of it. If then it is seen that no harm is being done, or very little harm is being done, be.causo nobody can protend a tax can do any good—l have not pretended this tax would do anybody any good—but if tho harm is not serious and the tax is working well, wo shall not bo so much in disogreemont as wo arc at the present lime. If. on tho other hand, it is found that there is an injury to racing, ns measured by the attendances at race meetings, then I ahull be willing to reconsider both the method and tho weight of the tax in the light of the experience which will have been obtained. Finally, I must say that there aro some forms of subterranean agitation which, though legitimate in a free country, nevertheless aro apt to harden opinion and rouse a combative spirit on both sides, and I should strongly advise you and urge you to let us have a fair "trial in a good atmosphere of the tax during the summer of tho flat-racing season, and, for my part, I promise a review of tlie whole position in tho light of the data which then will have been obtained. I have given a groat deal of thought to (ho questions of the totalisator and of legalising cash betting by post. I do not believe that the totalisator would necessarily bo so disadvantageous to tho bookmaking fraternity as it is sometimes represented, and I am certainly bound to toll you that opinion is gathering much more strongly in favour of it than was the case last year. I am surprised to find how many high authorities there are who a year ago were opposed to it and are now urging strongly that it should be adopted. Of course, it would require an alteration of tho betting laws, and that is not a subject which could be dealt with in a Finance Bill. Again, there is the question of ready-money betting through the post. It seems to mo I must admit illogical that a man may send a telegram making a bet

n a crotm. nooKmaxor. or may scna a cheque paying a bet after He has lost it, but may not send a postal order or a halfcrown with tho wager. That, again, is a matter which could not be included in a Finance Bill. Last year I made no change whatever in the betting laws, and I could not in the Finance Bill of tho present year make any change in the legal limits of betting.” Everybody who admires a great hors« will be sorry to see Heroic end his days on the turf ingloriously (says Posicdon). Tho Valais horse has had an adventrouons, but, withal, a brilliant career; although, except for his splendid effort in the Cup under a welter weight, his latest efforts in Sydney have not been worthy of him. Ho did so well, too, after his arrival here. Perhaps the cyclone upset him by interfering with the continuity c r his work, so that ho developed some fr inside. However, his recent failures will be forgotten when his notable victories are remembered. Heroic’s wins represented small fortunes in stakes for the two men who owned him, Mr J. R. Cortcen paid ISCOgns for the Chersono'e colt and won £24,513 10- with him. then he was knocked down at auction j to Mr C. B. Kellow at, l6,ooCgns, and he : - 1 ar 1- woe £13.519 in 'takes, Stake?, however, represent only a modest portion of the amount Heroic won for both ownoibhips. 'flic chestnut, was always looked i upon as a belting machine, and though line mechanism sometimes got out of gear, lie landed more ban one tremendous betting stake. Most, notable._ ct course, wits when, by winning tie Newmarket with | 0,5, be yot homo tho first log of cv*»r

£50,000 in double money. Heroic has missed the prize, which a couple of months ago seemed well within his reach —that of being the largest stake-winner in Australia; but there can bo little doubt that it for the last two years he had been reserved for woight-for-ago events, as Gloaming wa*, instead of being bobbed about between sprint and cup races, he would have been the record holder. Heroic is a horse of buch magnificent conformation that his career at the stud, which begins at Widden next season, ' will be watched with deep interest. If plans work out according to schedule in racing, how simple the game would bo (says a Melbourne writer). If the scheme mapped out by I red Jones and Maurice M'Carten could have been followed Limerick would have won tbe Sydney Cup on Saturday. Jones, trainer, and M'Carten, jockey, discussed at great length the probabilities of the manner in which the big race would b© run. Jhey rvere correct in almost every detail regarding other horses' paces, etc., yet their ideas about their own Jjorsc, Limerick, wore upset by an unfortunate mischane— The trainer and rider predicted that Piastoon would go to the front and slow down tho field in order to help him see out the journey. Tins is exactly what happened. The idea was that M Carton should keep just behind Piastoon all the way, and, reserving his mount for a final dash, sail away from the others in fho straight.. It was all right in theory, hat not in practice. Jast nCter tho start of the Clip when tho horses were settling down into their positions, Limerick was working his way across from tho outside —ho started from No 18 position—and it seemed a simple matter for him to take up Ino desired position owing to the slow paco Then Fate intervened. The New Zcnlunclcr slipped in a patch of bad going and was nearly down. H© lost ground, ana it took him liK) yards to get going again By that time tho gaps had been filled, and Limerick was on tho outside of the held. Ho did not go inside a horse throughout tho race, and that was a great handicap. EGMONT RACE MEETING. (He* iJu'ted Press Association.) HAWERA, May 11. Goltlpiece was scratched for nil engagements at the Egmont meeting at 3 o clock this afternoon. Archcien was also scratched at 4.30 p.m.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING., Otago Daily Times, Issue 20096, 12 May 1927

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SPORTING. Otago Daily Times, Issue 20096, 12 May 1927

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