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GENERAL ELECTION.

THE MATAURA SEAT. v MR ALEX. M'LACHLAN'S ADDRESS. 'ITiote was a good attendance of electors in tile Matauru, Town Halt on Monday ovonmg to hear au address by Mr Alex. M'Lachlan, tho official Labour candidate for the Mataura seat-. Tfao Mayor (Mr J. Lowtten) presided, and bespoke a good hearing for the candidate. Mr M'Laohlan, who was well received, commented by explaining hia position. Ho kadi been unanimously ohoseu as tho official Labour candidate for tho Mataura seat. Tho position had practically been forced upon him. as ha had declined nomination on many occasions, but his supporters had iiyh'iated, and that was why ho was now a candidate. Hia roason for declining hod been that he had a wife and a largo family dependent upon him, and a man's first duty was to his wife and family. However, ho also owed a duty to his country, and consequently he had acceded to the wishes of organised Labour in Mataura to become a candidate for this seat.—(Applause.) It was a high honour, indeed, to be a Labour oandidiito, and his intention was to make the people acquainted with the Labour Party's platform. Many people -were under tho impression that tno sole aim of tho Labour Party was the improvement of conditions and hours of labour. TTiis was a fallacy. Tho ideals of Labour wero far nobler and grander than that. Tho taproots of these ideals oommenced at tho foundation of our social system, and he was confident, that from these roots would bo developed a social system which would pormoato tho whole social sphero.—(Applause.) The Labour Party was fighting against groat odds. Against tho party was that powerful engine, tho pross. Vested interests and the prejudice of the people had also to he overcome. Tho waterside workers at Wellington had recently been blackened bv the press for refusing to unload coal, but their objection was not known to the general public It was *his: Tho coal merchants were charging £7 10s per ton for ooal in Wellington, and coal could bo put on the boats at. iWcstport for 35;. per ton. Instead of these men being criticised, thoy should have been praised for their iletion. It was evident . that the enormous increase did not represent tho cost of freight and handling in Wellington. The middlemen were practically making the difference between the cost of the coal on the boat at Westport and i tho price charged the consumer. In tho Old Country the miners had been blamed for striking; but what brought that about? It was brought about because the owners had prut 6s on to tho price of the coal. The peoplo Should not judge the Labour Party by the attitude of a hostilo press. Ho had a good cause to uphold, and his only wish was that they had got a bettor man to carry the banner. In tho x Witness, Dr Waddell had given a review I of tho Labour platform and had spoken in ! eulogistio terms of it. Wall, if he was ! f , wrong in the party he backed he, at any , rate, failed' in good company.—(Applause.) However, be was not afraid of opposition, j and was confident of his ultimate success. | In placing his views before the public he felt he had a great responsibility. The duty of every member of a party was to live up to tho high ideals of that party, and tins ha would strenuously endeavour to do. If a new party v?ero elected to control and ' administer tho affairs of the country, this much he could say for it: It could not do worse than the National Government had done. —(Applause.) There w<h no need for feelings of alarm over a new party being Eluced on the Treasury benches; they would ave the assistance of the present heads of departments, and would thus be able to carry on the business of the country just as well as those who wero endeavouring to do bo to-day. Furthermore, a new party would > not make a pretence of doing the work of 1 the country; they would do it, and do it well in tho interests of the people as a whole. —(Applause.) There were special reasons why the fanners should support the representatives of Labour. It was absolutely essential in the interests of the producers and consumers alike that the farmers should work in harmony with tho representatives of the workers. All producers were workers, and the interests of the great army of workers in this country were identioal. The farmers received something like 18d a pound for their wool, but when they went into a shop and bought a pound of wooJ they had to pay 16s for it. The difference in tho selling price and tho purchasing price was not represented in the treatment of tho raw articlo to make it the finished article. Who got this difference? Not tho man who produosd it, nor yet those who prepared it for the shops. It was the big , middlemen, and tho aim of his party was to cut out these middlemen. If they only • succeeded in eliminating one of these parasites then the Labour Party .would have done some good, and justified its existence. . —(Applause.) The speaker next dealt with the butter-fat' tax, which he said should nover have been imposed, and the Labour Party would not be a party to any such system of class taxation. It had been said that this tax would be refunded, but he had paid £15 of the butter-fat tax, and ho had nob' received any return, nor was ho ever likely to. Dealing with the meat question, tho candidate said _ the farmers had suffered in respect to this just as they had suffered in other respects. The Imperial Government now admitted that it could not give a fair price .for New Zealand meat, because of the high prices paid to the American Meat V Trust. From this question Mr M'Lachlan passed on to tho wheat question. He criticised the action of the Government in subsidising the flour millers on the tonnage basis for all flcrur produced. The Dunedin . millers, after receiving their subsidy, had reduced tho price of flour 10s per ton, and if they could do that then they could nive done it boforc, and consequently there was no need for the subsidy. If after tho treatment they had received from? the Gov- , crnment the farmers voted for their return ' to power, then, all ho could say was that they deserved whatever treatment was meted out to them—(Applause.) A great deal had been said about the price of bread • boing fixed, but what was the actual r.ft.wt of this? He had been informed bv a Halo* that his business was paying better fo<'ay than ever it had done. The bakers were making a profit of 2d per loaf on bread, whereas formerly thoy had only profited to tho extent of a halfpenny per loaf. These were questions for the fanners as well as the people generally to consider, and he hod 'no doubt whatever as to what their d-> cision would be.—(Applause.) The uHlicur Party advocated tho elimination of all wa.to. and the utilisation of all by-products .whi'h meant that industries would flourish, and a period of prosperity unprecedented in ihe history of this country would be established. The candidate next referred to the treatment of returned soldiers. He that this was a sorac\Yhat delicate mtitter to deaLwith, because of tho no&sibility of misunderstood. Tho man who would take advantage of tho war for political purp.i-os was indeed a mean man, but it was sn established fact that while every enco lragemenfc was given to men to enlist, they were not being treated fairly now that thoy had returned. Speilcing particularly with'reference to tho soldiers' settlement scheme of the Government, Mr M'Lachlan said that in many instances men wero being placed on land that they would never be able to I work successfully. With respect to the' gratuity, ho said the Government had decided to pay the men Is 6d per day, representing in' round figures something like £6,000,000 payable to all those' who rendered tho Empire such signal service during the late war. Now, what was £6.000.01!0 when they knew that the war profits had 1 amounted to something liko £100,000,000? Personally ho would prefer to call the gratuity by some other name. At a meeting held nt Dunedin recently soldiers' grievances had been ventilated. It appeared that the. Government, was discharging men and giving them a pension. They previously received 9s or 10s per day, but the tension only amounted to about 22a per week. It was not right that these men should be discharged if they were not fit.—(Applause.) Mr M'Laohlan went on to speak of the party leaders' visit# to the Homeland during which time tbey had left New Zealand to the tender mercies of Sir James Allen. He had never previously admired Sir James ' Allen, but he had to admit that if there was ono man in the Government who had come through the war period with credit t man .was Sir Ja/ren Allen.—(Applause.) Mr Massey and Sir Joseph Ward had cone Home on the invitation of the Impend Government, but he w*s of opinion that they had no right to Irnve New Zealand nt yneh n critical period. The Hon. R. T>nten Rhodes n.nd the With Commissioner IFir Thoo. Mackenzie) conM have ablv representor! th -1 dominion ,\t Home. Tt oofirred to him tV>t, it wns itist r>o«sih!o tb».f Mr M'is'cv and Sir .To<t"-ph Wan! had abused the privileges that tb~ir rnai+lnn tv, Government swvc them, nnd that personal nmWtion nnd ienlousy were rr>«r>onsiKl-> for both of them going to England. Mr W. Dn'vnie Stownrt. nrwibly one of the clearest tlrrkers in the House, had said that tho lenders wero carrying on a sham, fight., but Mr Stewrt. had been generous enon<rh not to include in this statement th"> Labour Pirty. Tf it were truo thnt a rham ficht were being carried on. then_ all he (the gp"«k"rl could s«v wiw thnt it wa« a dis- ' grooeful trick to «'ja-tr»c& th« Labour Party.

Labour would not b9 sido-traoked, as ho was confident the publio would see through tho scheme. —(Applause.) Tho candidate made passing rcferenco to Now Zealand's internet in Nauru Island. Ho said that when Air Massey was questioned regarding the l'eaco Conference ho had replied: "I regard it as satisfactory from New Zealand's point of view. \\ o majuigod to secure ail interest in tho valuable phosphate deposits on Nauru Island.' Mr MTdiohlim Bald that according to an axtiole written by Mr Stead, shipping conditions aloiis would make it an impossible proposition from tho dominion's standpoint, and wo would find that instead of being an asset, Nauru Island would bo one of the biggest white elephants over foisted an. tho publio.—(Applause.) Mr M'Laohlan, after , making passing n?fcrenco to tho high cost of living, which he said required tho closest investigation, passed oil to deal with the platform of the party ho was supporting. _lle said they might consider it idealistic and almost Utopian, but tlwy would at least conccdo that it was humanitarian. They wero advocating proportional representation, which proposal had been ■so well ventilated that he djd not consider it necessary to dwell upon it. He did not think that it would do all that was required, but he was satisfied to give it a fair trial. They would also advocate the recall and tho referendum. Tho latter plank they were familiar with, but. tho recall was a new idea, and meant that the constituents were given the "S''t to recall their member should he go back on his election pledges. This* ho contendod, was entirely just and reasonable. The* abolition of the Legislative Council was .another thing they' woutcl strive lor. Ho believed it was a farce. Mr had said that he was going to reform it; but instead ho had stuffed it wiln Ins own nomiuoes. As at present constituted it was simply an aristocratic old-ase pension scheme.—-(Laughter.) It was his belirf that a better method would be to appoint some half dozen men of the calibfe 01, say, hit Robert Stout, the Chief Justice—men whose legal knowledge and ability would be ot infinite value—and pay them a good salary, and so make them independent. Ihis would do away with the present obiectionabl? dual Chamber.—(Applause.) He favoured strongly tho granting of full civic rights to civil servants, because he felt that it would be a good thing. At present some of th.9 giant intellects of New Zealand were in the civil service, and they should be placed on the samo footing and enjoy the same rights as others.—(Applause.) , His party was advocating the nationalisa* tion of Crown lands, but he thought it would bo better to let people on to such lands on any tenure they liked. At present most of them harboured noxious weeds, etc., and by any means he would get them settled. Ho believed Mr, Massey owed his position to what might be called the freehold gag. He had frightened the Crown tenants into voting for his party, under tho pretext that tho Liberals were going to interfere with the State's contract with tenants on Crown lands. As a matter of fact, such a thing had never been thought of. The Labour Party realised that the contract between tho State and the individual must be held snored. There was absolutely nothing in tho bogey freehold v. leasehold. No matter what tenure a man held land under, tho 'State had the right to tax him. The candidate's opinion of the Labour Party's State farm scheme was that it was purely a local movement, for the purposo of producing food for State institutions. He did not think it was tho intention of tho labour Party to nationalise the whole of the land at tho present time. This might come later on. Discussing the question of State ownership of banking institutions, the candidate said ho believed that a State bank would be an accomplished thing in tho near future. Sir Joseph Ward was in favour of it. But the Labour Party would not advocate it on the lines suggested by him—viz., by buying out tho Bank of New Zealand. He believed it could be done along the lines adopted by the Australian Government, which had found that, through its bank, it could float a loan at a oost of 4s 6d per cent., where before it used to cost £2 7s per cent. Mr M'Lachlan next 'dealt with the question of a Stato owned shipping service. This wag a matter that tho Government should have tackled lorn? ago. The Commonwealth Government had bought a fleet, and it had paid for itself over and; over again. Ho understood that tho Union Company's fleet coul.l have been bought at the bec'nninjr of the war for £3.000.000. ■ If that had been done, instead of costing tho Government £6,000,000, as it had done, thev could allow £3,000.000 for expenses and 'still havo the fleet to show for it.

Continuing, he said that Sir Joseph Ward proposed to nationalise tho coalmin ; ng industry of New Zealand, but ho had grave doubts about this course being effective in solving the Labour question, so far as tho ooal business was concerned.

Proportional representation and tho reduction of the taxation paid by those least ablo to bear it were questions favoured by tho candidate, who also advocated tho nationalisation of the medical and dental professions of the dominion. He also favoured the improvement of cur State educational system in the direction of providing free the books U3ed by the scholars in the schools. What we wanted to instil in the children of the country was a humani tarian spirit, and less of tho Jingoistio spirit.—(Applause.) There wero tremendous possibilities in the development of hydroelectrical energy, and this should be encouraged in,every way. He was opposed to the Military Service Act, and would support any motion for its repeal. The great war had been fought to end wars, and wo should let tho world see that we wero sincere by Laying down our arms.—(" Hear, hear.") If wo attended now to the building up of the phjsique of our young manhood wo would find that if the time came that they wero wanted for war servico wo could make just as good soldiers of them in the three months' training as could be done in the years spent under the present system. He would say: Don't tinker with a toy navy for service round_ the coasts of New Zealand, but pay a fair share of the expense of protecting our shores to the British navy.—(Applause.) The meeting apparently was satisfied with the candidate's address, and no questions were asked, and he was accorded a hearty vote of thanks and confidence on tho motion of Mr Carroll. DUNEDIN NORTH. The request of the Chairman (Mr Geo. Calder) at Mr E. Kcllett's meeting last night in the Nortli-East Valley Town Hall to give the candidate a fair and patient hearing seemed to fall' on dull ears. Mr Kellett had not proceeded very far with his address, and had begun to speak on the labour manifesto euid those signing it, when the interruption oommenced. It was shortlived, but while it lasted it was of very brisk order, and brought the chairman to his feet more than onco with a strong protest. Any reference to Mr Paul or Mr Walker always produced tho same effect. Mr Kellett took all qu.to good temperedly, and as soon as he got on to other ground was listened to patiently enough. During tile discordant period one lady in the audience made herself heard very frequently. In fact, her interruptions became so often repeated that the candidate at length said, "You should bo standing, madam. You have got plenty of talk." . This had the effect of silencing the lady in question; to a very great extent at any rate. Several questions were put to Mr Kellett at the end of his address, and in the course of his replies ho mado it clear that he had not in any way profited over tho peace decorations, which, he said, had been carried out by Mr Geo. Simpson under the direction of Mr Gough. Mr Kellett explained that he. had missed nomination for the City Council to his being uw.r, in the counrty, and mistaking the date on which nominations closed. He would not pledge himself to vote with Mr Massey or Sir Joseph Ward on a no-confidence motion, as it would defeat the very object he had in view, which was to tako office as an Independent. There was no necessity for the Government to advance money to employers • for the purpose of erecting workers' dwellings, as lie thought the Government should do the building itself.

Somo little excitement wa« occasioned bv someone at the back of tho hall asking a question as to bankruptcy proceedings, Mr Kellett calling upon tho constable at tho door to take the man's name, and_ indicating the possibility of legal proceedings boing taken. Mr Geo. S. Thomson moved a vote of thanks to Mr Kellett for his address and one of confidence in Mr Walker as their representative. An amendment was moved and seconded that Mr Kellett be thanked for his address and that he be accorded a vote of con fidenco, the amendment being received " it' applause. The Chairman nut the amendment and the volume of voicc* appeared to be about eqtwllv balanced. The same result was obtained from a show of hands, and ne announcement was mode by the e.bnirman. Cheers wero given for Mr Wn'ker and counter cheers ,for Mr TCelWt.. and a vote of thanks to the chaii closed the meeting. OAMARTJ. Mr E. P. Lee is sp"nd : nr this week in tho southern part of his electorate, where he will address various meetinrrs. There was a good attendance at Goodwood on Monday, Mr Rremner presiding, and, after answering questions, a voto of thanks was aocordod tho speaker.

DUNEDIN CENTRAL. Mr C. K. Statliam addressed a largo meeting of electors at Anderson's Bay last evening. Mr T. Somurvillo wjm in tho chair, and in introducing tho candidate said that in these serious times it was tho duty of tho elector* to see that they returned tho risdit men to Parliament, and iio was suro that in Mr Stutluim tho electors of Anderson's liny had tho right man. Mr Statliam, who wis received with applause, dealt with a number of problems and some of tho responsibilities witli which wo aro faced at tho present day, and of the need of wis*?, prudent, and progressive legislation and administration. In speaking on the licensing question, Mr Statliam said he wished it to bo known that ho now stood for tho Imro majority. When ho had first stood for tho Rouse in 1911 the law pru vided for a three-fifths majority on tho prohibition issue. He had stated then that he proposed to leavo tho law as ho had found it placed upon tho Statute Book bv the wisdom of legislators of experience who had preceded him. Ho had regarded this statement as a pledge, and, having rcnowed it at last election, had faithfully observed it. In tho 1918 session the amending Licensing Act was passed, by which a lnrijo majority of the llouso had decided in favour of tho bare majority, and ho was prepared to leavo it at that. Not only had it been demonstrated beyond any doubt that the three-fifths majority was a thing of the past, but his eight years' parliamentary experience had certainly shown him that unless the referendum provided for a bare majority it was not in the best_ interests of tho country, for it completely failed to keep the question out of the general politics of the day. At the conclusion of his address, and after a few questions had been answered, Mr Monzies moved and Mr Kairbairn seconded, that a very hearty vote of thanks be accorded to Mr Statliam for his address. Til s being carried anrdst prolonged applause a vote of thanks to the chair terminated a most successful meeting. DUNEDIN SOUTH. The Caversham Oddfellows' Hall was crowded last evening, when the Labour candidate (Mr J. T. Paul) addressed the electors. Mr R. H. Todd occupied the chair. Mr Paul dealt fully with the political situation, analysing tile prospects and programmes of the parties. He strongly urged the necessity of returning the Labour Party in order that an end would be made of profiteering and exploitation. Mr Paul declared that tho time had arrived for a more vigorous policy _ in pushing forward the interests of the City of Dunedin. The candidate dealt with the conscription manifesto, and detailed his services during the war. Included in a large number of questions was one asking if Mr Paul was "the nominee of tho P.P.A." In reply, Mr Paul said ho was the nominee of the Labour Party. In his opinion every man's religion was entitled to respect, and he hoped to fight the election on political issues. A mast successful meeting concluded bv Messrs W. S. Piittison and Alexander moving n vote of thanks and confidence in Mr Paul, which tho chairman declared to be carried unanimously. CLUTHA. On Tuesday last Mr A. S. Malcolm spoke at Crookston, Mr Revie being in the chair, and, on the motion of Mr R. Potts, seconded by Mr M. Forguso.n. wa3 accorded a hearty vote of thanks and confidence. At Heriot Mr Malcolm had a good meeting and an excellent hearing, and received a vote of thanks, Mr Malcolm continues to be well received everywhere, in most cases receiving votes of thanks and confidence and freauent expressions of appreciation of his services as member. WAITAKI. During last week Mr John Bitchener, tho Reform candidate lor the Waitaki electorate, addressed large and enthusiastic meetings at Hakataramea, Kurow, Otekaieke, Otmke, Omarnma, Otematamata, and Duntroon. ,At every place the candidate was given a close and attentive hearing, and after his address answered several questions to the satisfaction of his audience. At Duntroon the candidate received a unanimous vote of thanks and confidence, and at all the other places a unanimous vote of thanks. At Otekaieke a special vote of confidence in the Massey Government was carried unanimously. Thi3 week Mr Bitchener is continuing his campaign in the southern part of the electorate, and is meeting with very t;ood receptions at every place he visits.

NOTES FROM WELLINGTON.

FACTS AND FIGURES.

(Fnow Ocb Own Cohiimpondint.i WELLINGTON, December 2.

During tiio weuk-end tiioio lias been notli.ng°of special interest to note regarding tho looa- campaign, but somo general notes on the position as it is at present may prove of interest. Up till quite recently it was really thought that Mr Wdiord would havo an easy win in the Ilutt electorate, but as tho days go pasc and Air Rishworth, the Reform cand.date, continues his series of successful meetings, and continues to receive assurances ot support from termor voters on the Liberal sido, many in tho Ilutt Valley are beginning to think that Reform has a good rhanco of winning the seit. The figures of past elections at least show that Mr Wilford will have to work ver> hard to get home with a comfortable majority. Hia majority, which in 1911 was close upon 2000, was in j.914 reduced to just over 900, but it is the details of the 19K figures that aro interesting, From these it would appear that Mr Wilford is dependent upon the Petoiio vote to assure him of victory. At tho two Petone booths at last election he had a majority of 1000 votes over Mr Samuel, the Reform candidate, but at tho many ether booths throughout the electorate Mr Samuel beat him by 1908 votes to 1794. This year Mr Wilford cannot hope to have anything like so big a majority in Petone, because tho Labour candidate will certainly poll pretty well there, and may be expected to interfere with Mr Wilford's totals in other parts of tho district. Mr Wilford may, therefore, find his former majority dwindl.ng to pretty near vanishing point, if it does not disappear altogether. The figures in connection with Wellington North are also interesting. In 1911' the Reform majority was 1810. In 1914 it had risen to '2500, and at the by-election it fell to just over 400; but it must not bo forgotten that at that election over 800 votes went to Mr Brandon, a second Reform candidate, which votes would have been cast for Mr Luko had Mr Brandon not gone to tho poll. Thus the Reform vote in this constituency may fairly be assumed to bo still about 4000. A fourth candidate at the 1919 by-election polled 622 votes, and the Labour candidate (Mr Holland) 2568 votes. Thus tho total Liberal and Labour vote was onlv 3300. So it may, on the figures, be safelv assumed that on this occasion, with a Liberal and a Labour candidate standing against Reform, the last should prove' victorious, even though Mr Luke is not so able and popular a candidate as Mr Headman, who won the seat with such a big majority, even in tho days of Mr Seddon, when Liberalism was at its high-water mark, and the Reform fortunes wero nt rather a low ebb. The seat is not tin easy one for tho Liberals to win. Unless there is a change of feeling—of which there is no sign at prc.^nt—it would not be surprising to find the Liberal candidate at the bottom of tho poll. As tho campaign proceeds numbers of peop'e are beginning to '.hink that Mr M'tchell will defeat Mr Semple for Wellington South, but at present I am inclined to think that tho official Labour candidate will just get home. Up to the present there are no signs that Mr Pirani will defeat Mr Fraser. the official Labour candidate for Wellington Central. In the by-election the latter got in with a majority of 1624. though on this occasion many electors failed to go to the poll. For Wellington E.-.st. and the Suburbs there is every indication that the Reform candidates will aerain bo victorious, though in each case a Liberal candidate has been put up to split the vote. In Otaki Mr Field continues to do well, •ind in tho event of Mr Afossey getting a majority over St Joseph Ward in the new House. Mr FHd w : ll vote with Mr Massey. Mr Field's Reform maiority at' last election, as a straicht-out Reform candidate, was 640. Tt should not be less on the present occasion.

Thi« is an absolutely fair and impartial summing un of tho pof'tion as far as it "n be made at the moment in regard to t' l " sent* in and about Wellington. News from Auckland ail go to show t'-it, Mr \r.««R<>v will improve his position there, generally, there is nn doubt that tli" if Sir Jownh Ward's party from the \ T it. ; ( ,ial novernnient before tho <md of Parliament, nnd the fact tb"t, pi.rfv iric ao bv th" T,iberMs. is to hn'n M* Massey in oomirin- eon test. This noint is discusser! in nn n.rtiele in to-dav's Dhnv'nion. which nointf? t« the fact thnt. ns the pnrt'rn stryid when thoy went to the conntry the Reformers had a considerable advantniro over the strongest opposing grouo. Hi" Reform Party's strength was 41 in a House of 80 members, and the T ibenls, if they had been nhle in a by election to return a candidate in place of the late Mr C-olvin. would have gone to the country 31 strong, A nm iority of thn other e : ght members of tho Ilouse which has just been disaolvad

woro Labour Socialists and extremists. Tho rapidly-rising- popularity of tho Reform I'art.y in Auckland provinco is a marked fon turn of tho campaign. It is made evident by tin* utterances of various candidates that onn factor contributing to thin state of affairs >s (ho personal pomihiritv of the Prime Minister. It lias been made particularly clear in tho north t.lmt Mr Miu'soy never stood higher 'if popular esteem than lie does today. At tho same lirno thorn seems to - bo amongst the people in that part of tho dominion a very keen appreciation of tho need of a new outlook in polities. This state of mind is hound tp strengthen the Reform Party, which so obviously is tho livest. and niofit progressive political force ot the day, and to correspondingly weaken its chief opponents, handicapped as tho v already are by their inability to break away from hackneyed and out-of-date party traditions. Tho fear that there may be a combination between tho Liberal and the Labour Party continues to have n very important bearing on the election, and olio j? constantly meeting- former Liberals who, for this reason alone, are now supporting the Massey candidates, especially in case's where they liavo stated that they arc less enamoured ot party than lWore, and are prepared to take, a more independent stand in regard to future legislation. The Labour Party is leaving no stone unturned to ensure all possible success for their candidates, and their is certainly good. They are also distributing a considerable amount of printed matter to almost every house in Wellington.

A Timaru Press Association telorrr.-im states that Sir Joseph Ward will .speak at Teniuka ori Thursday night.

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Bibliographic details

GENERAL ELECTION., Otago Daily Times, Issue 17798, 3 December 1919

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GENERAL ELECTION. Otago Daily Times, Issue 17798, 3 December 1919

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