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OBITUARY

PROFESSOR SALMOND. Dr William Salmond. Professop-Emeritu3 of Mental and Moral Philosophy in the University of Otago, passed away at his residence, Queen street north, at 9 o'clock yesterday morning. Ho hod been suffering greatly for several months past from a painliil diseasu, but it was peacefully, in his sleop, that tho end come to his long, active, and useful life. Dc Salmond was' born in Edinburgh in 1805, and was educated at Heriot's Hospital, the Edinburgh High School, and Edinburgh University, where ho graduated as B.A. in 1853/ and subsequently as M.A. la 1882 the. honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by tho Glasgow University, and three years later his alma mater bestowed a Jikc honour upon him He studied theology in Scotland and Germany for four years, and, in 1858, was ordained minister of tho Presbyterian Church of North Shields, in tho North of England, where ho remained' 17 years. Having been appointed first Professor of Theology under tho Presbytorian Synod of Otago and Southland, ho arrived at Port Chalmers in February, 1876, by tho ship Corona. For ten years he retained his position in tho Theological Hall, but, in 1886, upon the resignation of Professor D. Macgregor, ho was appointed to tho Chair of Mental and Moral philosophy in Otago University in 1886, tho appointment being made by tho Presbyterian Synod, of which he was Moderator at tho time, and confirmed by tho University Council. Ho resigned his chair in 1915 ; in consequeneo of his increasing infirmities, and was granted tho title of Emeritus Professor. In 1882 ho was elected a member of tho Senate of New Zealand University, and occupied a seat on that body for a number of years. Professor Salmond published a number of sermons, lcctmes, and pamphlets, chiefly theological, and contributed largely to periodicals. Ho was married in Scotland in 1861 to a daughter of the Rev James Young, cf Dunfernlino, and his surviving family consists of lour sons and four daughters. His eldest son, John "William Salmond, K.C., a graduate of Otago University, was for some years tho occupant of tho Chair of Law at Adelaide University, and subsequently Professor of Lav/ at Victoria College, Wellington, is tho author of a standard work on Jurisprudence, and is at the present time Solicitorgeneral of this dominion. Tho remaining sons are Mr J. L. Salmond, of the firm of Salmond and Vanes, architects, of Dunedin; Professor C. F. Salmond, Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy in Canterbury I College; and Mr Edwin iSalmond, of the firm of Salmond and Spraggon, importers, of Wellington. The daughters are Mrs Joseph Allan (of Dunedin), widow of the late Mr Joseph Allan, of Hopohill,, Taieri; Mrs William Kidston (of Wellington); Mrs F. Gunther (of Pforzheim, Germany); and Miss Ruth Salmond (of Dunedin). At tho mooting of the University Council yesterday tho Chancellor made reference to the death of Dr Salmond, who, ho said, had passed away that morning. Ho referred to his indebtedness to tho deoeasecT gentleman in his past capacity as a student, and moved—" That the council desires to express its sympathy with Mrs Salmond and family in their great loss through tho death of Dr Salmond, who had for many years rendered groat service, to tho University ns an honoured member of the staff. Further, that a copy of thi? resolution bo forwarded to Mrs Salmond." Tho' motion was carried in the usual way. Touching on the death of Dr Salmond at the opening of the Theological Hall session yesterday the Rev. Mr Balfour said his passing marked the close of an epoch in the history of the Theological Hall," and also in tho history of tho University. ' Many years ago he came out here as the first Professor of Systematic Theology. For years after that he was Professor of Mental Science in the University. He was a man with a sirong personaiiy, and must have left his mark on very many students! In his company one always was conscious of a very alert mind and a quick and genial wit, and behind and beneath it all there was a true and deep devotion to God and His Church. They were thankful to know that, though Ids illness was so prolonged, yet his passinsr was very quiet and very gentle. This wellknown figure would be much missed from the streets and the life of Dunedin. For the widow and family their hearts Went out in deep sympathy, and he would ask ,thern for a moment to stand as an expression of sympathy. The audience rose and remained standing for a time in silence.

HON. TAAME PAEATA. j Tho Hon. Taarao Parata, member of the Legislative Council, passed away yesterday morning after a long and severe illness. Mr Parata was born-at lluajpuko, an island south of tile Bluff, in 1837. He was a chief of the Ngaitahu, Waitaha, and Ngatimamoo tribes of tho South Island. His genealogy extended back to the timo of tho traditional migrations from Hawaiki, and he was a direct descendant of the iamous navigator, Tamatea, the captain of the Takitimu canoe, which arrived from Hawaiki sometime during the 10th Air Parata was also a descendant of Pai-kea-ariki, a famous demi-god of ancient days, and an ancestor of tho Maoris. Whilo Mr Parata was a youth ho moved to Puketeraki, whoro ho resided with his uncle, llaeroroa. Then he joined the pilot service at Otago Heads, but after a lew years of that employment he rejoined his uncle a-t Pukefceroki, where he resided during the rest of his life, following agricultural and pastoral pursuits. Ho was elected to Parliament in 1885 by the South Island Maoris' as their representative, and served them, with credit for 27 years. He was succeeded in this post by his son Charles Rakatauhako\ who is the present member for the Southern Maori district in tho House of Representatives. Tho Government called tho deceased to tho Legislative Council in 1912, in recognition and appreciation of his long and valued term of parliamentary work. Mrs Parata died some yoar9 ago, and five sons and six daughters survive to mourn their loss. 'These are Messrs John and Henry Parata (Puketeraki), Thomas and William T. Parata (Rotorua), and Charles R. Parata, M.P., Mosdames Ton-i (Ruapuke), Ellison and To Tau (Puketeraki), Karetai (Otakou), Clivo Evans (Dunedin), and Miss Parata. (Puketeraki). llie majority of the members of the family have assembled at Puketeraki, whore the funeral will tako,place on Saturday.

MR F. W. MARCHANT. News has been received by cable of the death in England on February 11 of Mr Frederick William Marchant, who was well known in New Zealand as a civil engineer (says a Press Association message from Timaru). He had much to do with the early harbour works at Timaru. He laid out tho Now Plymouth breakwater, and was consulted concerning "Gisborne and elsewhere. At Gisborne he laid out the water supply and drainage schemes. As engineer to local bodies ho devised many schemes for water-races, building the first ferro-con-crete bridge in New Zealand for the Opihi River. Ho designed and carried out in many places a system for confining vagrant shingle rivers at bridges by means of artificial banks, which have been the means of saving thousands of pounds to local authorities. He loaves a widow, two married daughters, and one son, Dr Eric Marchant, of the N.Z.A.M.C. in France. Another son. a, captain in the Bth Mounted Rifles, was killed in Egypt.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19170307.2.3

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY, Otago Daily Times, Issue 16946, 7 March 1917

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1,247

OBITUARY Otago Daily Times, Issue 16946, 7 March 1917

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