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THE OTAGO DAILY TIMES FRIDAY, APRIL 16, 1915. THE DOMINIONS AND THE SETTLEMENT.

The statement which the Secretary of State for the Colonies has made in the House of Commons relative to the views expressed by the .Prime Minister of the commonwealth may, we really believe, be taken as expressive also of tho views of most of the politicians and people of the dominions concerning the proposal that an Imperial Conference should be held during the progress of the war. It has been repeatedly urged in The Times, which has employed arguments very similar to those that have been used in more than one article in the Round Table, that it is of tho greatest importance that an Imperial Conference should be convened this year in order that the representatives of the dominions may have the opportunity of discussing "with tho Imperial Government the terms of the settlement after the war. It has been almost suggested that the dominions will be slighted and affronted if no Conference is held. It "will bo unfortunate if the impression secures currency anywhere taat the dominions are themselves anxious that a Conference should be summoned this year and that the decision < of the Imperial Government to defer the Conference runs, counter to their wishes. There is not the trace of an indication in New Zealand of the existence of' the desire on the part of Ministers, as representative of the dominion, that the Conference should be held this year as, in tho absence of the crisis created by the war, it "would have been held. The contrary is, indeed, the case. The considerations -which have prevented the Prime Minister from accepting an invitation to attend a conference of Premiers in Australia would operate with magnified force to prevent him or any of his colleagues from attending an Imperial Conference in London. It must be so also with the Ministers of the Crown in other oversea dominions. Obviously General Botha, without whom the Conference would be quite incomplete, cannot be spared from South Africa until the campaign against the Germans there has been successfully terminated. The agitation, therefore, in favour of the summoning of a Conference is uncalled for and mischievous, and it is certainly not supported, so. far as we can judge, by any large body of public opinion in the dominions themselves. After all, it will be a simple matter for the Imperial Government to consult the dominions by cable, if it is impracticable to consult their representatives personally—as ifc may be anticipated it will be—regarding the few points in the settlement in which they will be directly interested. Any claim that the dominions should have a voice iri the decision of the large issues which; will have to be settled when the terms of peace are being discussed is not.one that has been advanced with the authority of any of their Governments. Nor does the public feel that in these matters there is any reason for supposing that the Imperial Government may not be trusted to give full effect to the wishes of the entire Imperial family.

THE CITY TRADING DEPARTMENTS. The City Treasurer's statement giving the summarised results of the operations of the various municipal trading departments during the past year, must bo regarded as generally satisfactory. The effect of the war has been noticed in one department at least, for to it is attributable during the last six months a shrinkage in the revenue derived from the sale of electrical power, this arising from the fact that a number of the customers of the department have | not been working full time and have, required less than their usual Supply of power.. A glance at the figures shows that, as -usual, the Water Department furnished the most handsome profit for the twelve months, increased charges for renewal and depreciation being more than counterbalanced by increase of revenue. As a fresh illustration of the magnitude of the business operations -which are conducted by the city, it may be noted that, the four trading- departments—Gas,

Water, Electric Power and Lighting, and Tramways—produced during the past twelve months an aggregate revenue of close on £225,000 and involved an expenditure of nearly £194,000, leaving a net profit in the aggregate of a trifle over £31,000. But for the fact that, a fairly substantial reduction has been effected in working expenses, mainly in respect of the cost of power, the Tramways Department would not have made a particularly good showing, since there was an actual decline of revenue to the extent of £842. For purposes of comparison the results of the operations of" the trading departments during the last few years are instructive, and in round figures are as appended: Gas Department. 1914-15. IUI3-14. 1912-13. 1911-12. Receipts ... £47,845 £48,263 £47,802 £47,717 Expenditure 41,935 42,724 41,951 41*336 Net profit ... 5,910 5,539 5,851 6,'381 Wateb Department. 1914-15. 1913-14. 1912-13. 1911-12. Receipts ... £41,671 £40,072 £36,843 £33,646 Expenditure 25,517 24,231 23,980 21156 Net profit .... 16,154 15,841 12,863 12,490 Team way's Department. 1914-15. 1913-14. 1912-13. 1911-12. Receipts ... £77,425 £78,267 £74,912 £71 763 Expenditure 72,170 74,217 69,436 68,643 Nut profit ... 5,255 4,050 5,476 3,120 Electric Power and Lighting. 1914-15. 1913-14. 1912-13. 1911-12. Receipts ... £57,627 £51,939 £43,721 £38,711 Expenditure 53,767 50,947 42,642 '37,703 Not profit ... 3,860 992 1,079 1,008 These will probably be of special interest to the electors at a time when the results of the operations of two or three of the departments are being discussed by candidates for the mayoralty.

I ■ i Wk publish thi3 morning an interesting , cabls message which suggests that the [ leaders of the Young Turk party, who threw their country into the war at the instigation of Germany, are beginning to realise that they have been betrayed. What the- promises were that were made by Germany, which led to the unprovoked intervention of Turkey, can only be a matter of conjecture. The presumption is, however, that they included an offer of extensive military assistance in the defence

of the Ottoman Empire as well as of financial aid. This view is supported by the statement that tho Turks have applied to Germany for armed forces to create a diversion in Serbia as a reply to the attack on the Dardanelles. They have applied in vain. Tho war in which Germany is engaged upon two fronts is making an extreme demand upon her military resources. The situation in tho east must by this time, in view of the increasing exhaustion of Austria under the constant and severe pressure from Russia, be one of critical acuteness. It is easy to believe, therefore, that General von der Goltz has had to inform the Young Turks that it is idle to look for military assistance from Germany, since she cannot possibly spare any men. It will not be snrprising, therefore, if the conviction has forced itself upon tho minds of Enver Bey and Talaat Bey that they liave been duped and that Germany has lured Turkey to tho doom which, it is confidently hoped, now awaits her. The suggestion that Turkey may, by concluding a separate peace, extricate herself from the perilous predicament in which the conduct of her misguided leaders has placed her is not one that will appeal , to the peoples of the Allied countries if it means that the misgovemment of that country is any longer to be tolerated. The opportunity for bundling the Turks as a nation "bag and baggage"—in Gladstone's historic phrase—from Europe has presented itself in the war, and civilised Europe will be gravely disappointed if it is not turned to. full advantage.

It is to bo hopeiTthat the meeting which is to be held in the Town Hall this evening with a view to the formation of a townplanning branch of the organisation which has for many years done good work under the name of the Reserves Conservation Society, and is henceforth to y be known as the Amenities and Town-Planning Society, will reveal an encouraging interest in the project on the part of the citizens. All impressions of the mission upon which two envoys of the Garden Cities and Town Planning Association of Great Britain last year visited this community will hardly have been effaced from the public mind. There should be no need, therefore, to enlarge here upon the advantages and benefits of which town-planning, intelligently conducted, can be productive. To a discussion on the influences of environment there would be no end. It suffices to say that there is a much better prospect that what is desirable will emerge out of a healthful than out of an unpromising environment. There are many cities that are object-lessons and warning as to the manner in which great centres of population ought not to be allowed to grow and expand. The manner, again, in which many small towns have been laid out reveals a lamentable lack of , foresight ■ and judgment. Looking at town-planning as a modern science, or a science at least that has experienced a needed revival of late years, we cannot but recognise the advantages that young countries, which have not a great deal to pull down, should possess in its practice. While town-planning is the enemy of urban ugliness, it is also utilitarian in its objects. It aims at improving in a wide and comprehensive sense the conditions amid which people dwell in cities. It is concerned with sanitation and fresh air as well as with architecture. It makes war against the haphazard and illogical expansion of suburbs. It makes provision for the future. The spirit that animates town-planning associations is a spirit in which every ■■ community ought to be educated. It is because the community is not so educated that the guiding hand of the town-planner is necessary. Dunedin as a city has been lavishly endowed by Nature, but these endowments are not impregnable -nor are they all-sufficing. The people of the city have seen many illustrations, moreover, of the way in which the appearance of a city may not be improved. There is ample room, therefore, for,the activities of a town-planning association in our midst.

Reference to town-planning recalls one aspect of the present plight of Belgium. The day is coming, and we trust is not far distant, when there will be a call for great activity in repairing the material portion of the cruel devastation wrought upon that country. Speaking a few days ago at the opening of the Belgian TownPlanning Exhibition, Lord Bryce drew an attractive picture of a new Belgium, happy and prosperous, and never losing the admiration of mankind for the splendid spirit in which she has faced this crisis in her history. We may take it for granted that in the re-establishment of their trade, manufactures, and general prosperity the people of Belgium will give a further display of those qualities which the war has called forth in them. And

the circumstances tinder which Lord Bryce's utterances were made remind us that -when the time for rehabilitation has come Belgium, by very virtue of the devastation wrought upon her towns and cities,- will present peculiar opportunities for putting town-planning theories into practice on a large scale. There seems little doubt-that the inauguration of some comprehensive scheme in this direction may- be looked for. • Some time ago an international movement was set on foot for the rebuilding of Belgium into one of ■ the garden spots of the world, the idea, according to one account, being to erect in. the devastated cities, towns, and villages model homes whieh, while preserving as much as possible the picturesqueness of the buildings levelled, by the enemy, will exemplify the best examples of community building. The difficulties which the town-planners will have to overcome in reconciling different styles and periods of architecture, so as to produce the harmonies that are supposed to be a feature of town-planning schemes, may be considerable, but they should not prove in any way insuperable. In any- case there is evidence of a timely recognition of the opportunity which, the rebuilding of Belgium promises to afford, and it seems by no means unlikely that " the new Belgium" which Lord Bryce has pictured will furnish the world with more comprehensive and attractive achievements in the adoption in practice of town-planning theories than it has yet had placed before it. Such a consummation would mean a great triumph for the beneficent gospel of town-planning, and it is only fitting that as the misfortunes of the Belgians have been the subject' of international solicitude so the restoration of their material well-being should be made the subject of international concern. It may be readily understood that among the businesses that will be most greatly affected by the war will be those of the life insurance companies. Some of these corporations may almost be shaken to their foundations by the magnitude of the claims that will have to-be met by them. The colonial companies will in all probability escape comparatively lightly, but the influence of the war will be felt by them not only through the deaths of members but also almost certainly through a diminution in their ordinary business. The extent of the operations .of the Australian Mutual Provident Society is so vast that the business of this organisation may with a good deal of truth be said to srerve as a barometer of the economic conditions of Australasia. The report of the society for T914, covering a period of five months during which the war was in progress, is therefore a document of general public interest. A reference , to it shows that, compared with the preceding year, there was a shrinkage in the total new business in the ordinary department from 24,328 policies, representing a net assurance of £6,994,285, to 23,228 policies for £6,563,369. The new premium in«oroe, on the other hand, showed an increase from £224,560 to £263,212. In

tho industrial department, the new business that was written last year com- 1 prised 25,580 policies assuring £968,892 as compared with 30,037 assuring £1,125,395 in the preceding year. The figures of the revenue account show a healthy development. The total income increased from £3,930,266 in 1913 to £4,190,018, and, although the disbursements in respect of claims and surrenders, and also in respect of taxes, showed a considerable expansion, the amount added to the funds through the operations of the year were £1,476,122 as compared with £1,438,223 in the preceding year. The operations of the society, viewed in this aspect, were highly successful, and the fact that the accumulated funds amounted at the close of last year to the imposing total of £33,289,974 supplies a sufficient indication of the ability of the institution to stand without difficulty any strain to which it may bo subjected through the unprecedented occurrences that are rendering the present time 'the most stirring in the whole history of the world.

Colonel Robin, Officer Commanding the Territorial Forces, inspected the camp of tho 10th Regiment at Oamaru yesterday. Ho expressed the opinion that, considering they had been only a day in camp, they were very satisfactory, though, naturally, they had a lot to learn. To-day the 4th Regiment will leave Dunedin by a special train at 10.30 a.m., and go into camp about two miles from Sutton. The 14th Regiment will enter camp Later on, and tho complete camp will consist of between 1000 and 1200 men. The statements contained in a paragraph in our issue of yesterday, concerning an application to tho Prize Court of London for tho condemnation of 52 bales of wool that were shipped from Now Zealand for transhipment to Hamburg or Bremen were, it has been represented .to us, incorrect in* so far as they related to the nationality of the shippers. Wo are informed that

tho allegation against tiiis firm, Messrs llhodies and Co., who havo business premises an Antwerp, is that they are a German Ji rnii and that the firm's buyers in tho dominion were both Germans, who have, it may bo assumed, been fighting under the Gorman, colours in tho war. At a meeting of tho Faculty of Arts and Science on Tuesday evening, Dr Gilray (Deari) in tho chair, tho following resolution was unanimously adopted on fcho motion of the Dean, seconded by Dr Benham:—"As Mr Prank Hyde Campbell, ,M.A., has resigned his position as lecturer on German, which he has filled with great efficiency since 1902, tho Faculty of Arts and Science desires to place on record its profound appreciation of the value of Mr Campbell's services in promoting tho study of tho German language and literature in the University of Otago. Although German is little studied in educational institutions in New Zealand, which has rendered Mr Campbell's work among us exceptionally discouraging, he has always conducted his small class with conspicuous zeal, energy, and success. Tho Faculty greatly regrets to bo separated from so genial and able a colleague, and wishes Mr Campbell every success and prosperity in his future career." A few months ago the Harbour Board was subjected to some sliarp criticism for its delay in providing deep water berthage at the Port Chalmers wharves. It was pointed out at tho time that tho board had been negotiating with the Government in order to have the Georgo street wharf piles reinforced before dredging close up alongside the Avharves. Nothing has been done so far in the direction of strengthening the -wharves, but the departmental objections having apparently been overcome, dredge 222 has been kept busily engaged in deepening tho berthage, with the result that at the present time there is a depth of 30ft at low tide on tho south side of tho George street wharf, and in about a week's time the north sido .will have a similar depth. The basin between the \ Bowen and George street piers has been I dredged out to a corresponding depth, so that in future big liners will be able to remain at their moorings on a draught of about 30ft without risk. At a meeting of tho St. Hilda Platoon of the National Eeserve last night it was decided to form a miniature rifle club, the St. Kilda Council having kindlv offered'the uso of the Town Hall for this purpose. Arrangments have been made for the opening of t/he club on Thursday, May 6. The next parade of the platoon will be held on Thursday, April 22. It seems probable (telegraphs our Wellington- correspondent) that the construction of the now Parliamentary Buildings will be somewhat delayed. Tho specifica-

tions provide for the- use of a considerable quantity of marble, which is obtainable at Sandy Bay (Nelson). The contractors relied upon the owners of the only quarry in that district to furnish that stone, but the quarry owners, while able to supply small pieces of stone, could not supply big blocks such as will lje required for certain parts of the building. After long negotiations, and a prospect of the neighbourhood for deposits of stone, the contractors have at length commenced to open up a new quarry. Unfortunately the work involves heavy stripping and the- construction of a length of tramline, so that it may bo several months before stone- is available. Until tho stone can be obtained tho stonemason's work on the building must cease. One result of the deky will be that tho contractors will have to reconstruct the covered way, known as " tho tube," connecting tho present Parliament House with tho Library. During tho past year 26 meetings of the Otago Hospital and Charitablo Aid Board were held. All tho meetings were attended by Mrs Jackson, Mr J. H. Walker (chairman), Mr W. T. Talboys, and Mr F. G. Oumming. Mr W. E. S. Knight was present at 25 meetings, Mr S. S. Myers 24, Mr H. M. Driver 23, Dr Marshall Macdonald 22, Mrs Ferguson 21, Mr J. Cumming 21, Mr C. N. Scurr 19, Mr R. Templ&ton 15, Mr Walter Blaokie 12, and Mr A. F. Quelch 9. Mr Blaokie resigned m October, 'his place being taken by Mr Quelch. Brickmaking is another industry that has been affected by tho war (telegraphs our Wanganui correspondent). A witness at the Taylorville. Bank Commission yesterday morning said that the output of bricks manufactured! at Wanganui 'Lad decreased by from 25 per cent, to 50 por cent, since the outbreak of war. In yesterday's issue of tho Otago Daily Times, in the report dealing with the meeting of farmers at Taihape, when tho mattor of the Ca-lifomian thistle was discussed, tho following statement appeared as having been mado by one of tho farmers: "Tho seed carried by the wind did not germinate" Yesterday morning the Inspector for Noxious Weeds (Mr Dencker) (writes our Palmerston ■ correspondent) brought in a specimen of this thistle which has evidently grown from seed. Tho plant is complete by itself, and has no trace of 'having been attached to any parent plant. The annual meetings for the elections of school committees will take placo on Monday evening. Householders should observo that, in accordance with the Education Act, the nominations of candidates must be made in writing, and must bo handed to tho chairmen of tho committees by Monday. Our Hawea Flat correspondent informs us that dee?-stalkers who havo returned from the Hunter Valley report that tho forest in mat direction is heavily 'overstocked, and that culling is 'badly required. Fair heads have been secured by several stalkers. It is reported that one of the best taken so far was a 15-pointer, shot in Boundary Creek by a sportsman from Timaru. Mr Dunning has also obtained a good head on tho Makarora side. A number of parties aro still out Tho weather ha 3 been ideal for the sport, in strong contrast, to that of other years duriog the early part of the season.

"Wo havo been much struck with the great resources of Australia and New Zealand, and we havo nofc the slightest doubt that largo trading operations could be carried on to our mutual advantage," said Dγ Miura, ono of the Japanese Commissioners, in an interview at "Wellington. '" Look at the trade Germany tm» been doing with you in the past! Why should not we—your faithful allies at a critical time —havo some sharo of that trade now ? Asked if tho treaty with Japan was likely to last, Dr Miura replied: "Our hope is that it shall last for all time. You will find us more steadfast than tiho Germans." The next question asked was: "Do you seek any preference in the tariff?" Dr Miura replied: " Well, of course, wo recognise your first duty to your Motherland, but is it not a fair thing to suggest that your Allies, coming next, should have some advantage over other nations? Have we not played a better part to you than your American cousins?" Recent complaints were made that visitors to Rotorua were annoyed by the- too persistent attention of " touts " from boarding houses and coaching firms, and a petition, signed by the representatives of certain businesses, -was presented to tho authorities urging that a by-law be framed with tho object of preventing "touting" in tho streets of the town. This, it ia understood, was forwarded to Wellington for tho consideration of the heads of the Tourist Department. An opposition, movement has now developed, and telegrams have . been sent to the Hon. R. Heaton Rhodes, Minister in charge of the department, and to Mr B. M. Wilson, its general manager, requesting that no action be taken in the direction of complying with the prayer of the petition until the residents of the town have expressed their opinion on the question by means of a public meeting, and stating that tho petitioners represented merely a portion of the community. It has been suggested that the troubles In regard to "touting" might be got rid of if licenses to canvass for business wero issued by the Tourist Department and stringent measures adopted to prevent canvassing by unlicensed persons, and also to ensure that holders of licensee acted strictly in accordance with regulations. Speaking at the annual meeting of the Plunket Society at Wellington on Monday, Dr Collins congratulated the society upon its excellent achievements for the year (say.9 tho Dominion). He paid tribute to the work of the founder, Dr Truby King, and of Lady Plunket, after- -whom the nurses had been named, and said that the fruits of their labours, the well-being of the mothers, the care of the infants, and the close attention to the feeding of the latter, had passed to Tasmania, Australia, the lying islands, and to America. There was even an echo of it in England. Of vital importance in the question of rearing young children was the milk supply. It was better in Wellington than it was some years ago, but the adulteration of the milk with water was still frequent. The question of milk had had the earnest attention of the Hospital Board, who had practically determined to acquire a farm of thenown./ That movement, however, was only in regard to tho milk supply for the Hospital,- but the milk supply generally -was a question for the community as -well. The " bovine tjpe of tuberculosis was undoubtedly transmitted from, tuberculous cows to children, and such a society as the Plunket Society could do much in regard to the effort to secure a good milk supply. The nurses' as they went from house to house could collect samples of tho milk which was used, send it to the Government Bacteriologist for analysis, and by that means a fanidea could be arrived at as to the purity or otherwise of the milk which was used. One of tho most striking features of the all-day and night operations by the 4th Reinforcements and attached unite on Friday and Saturday was tho splendid spirit displayed by the men (says the Wellington Post). In marching out of camp to j engage upon their sham campaign no body of, men could. possibly have been keener, and they maintained that spirit until they arrived"back in camp some' 24 ; t0'27 hours later. The men particularly enjoyed their night of "soldiering" out in the open, everyone making the best of things, and when all hands were aroused at 2 a.m. to make the grand assault at dawn the prevailing element was one of the utmost good humour. At 6 a.m., when the manoeuvres were concluded, the whole of the respective units had their breakfast, and marched back to camp, a distance by road of some 10 or 12 miles. Although somewhat tired after their all-day and night exertions, the men still displayed tho greatest cheerfulness, many of tho units, notably the infantry, singing chorus songs as they wended their way back to Trentham. In doing so they set an excellent example to the reinforcements who arc to follow. At its special meeting- on Monday evening at Wellington, tho Federated Seamen's Union considered a letter from Amsterdam appealing for financial help for the distressed workers of Belgium (says tho Post). On tho recommendation of the executive it was resolved that two quarterly subscription lists be issued—one in May and one in August—in aid of the Belgian workers; each member of the union to' bo asked to subscribe 5s on each list, and each member

subscribing 5s on a list to bo given a certificate showing that he is a subscriber to this deserving cause. It is proposed that the certificate shall be of a character emblematical of the calling represented by tho union, and of a size that .-will permit of its being inserted in a member's union book. Tho president of the Otago Expansion League last night received the following telegram from Mr Pope, Government representative, who is accompanying the Japanese Trado Commissioners in their New Zealand tour:—" Japanese Trade Commissioners (two) arrive Dunedin on Monday afternoon; return north Wednesday." Arrangements have been made by the leaguo to entertain tho commissioners at luncheon on Tuesday, and during the day they will be shown a number of the local industriesMessrs Ross and Glendining'a Woollen Mills, New Zealand Paper Mills at Woodhaugh, Messrs R. Hudson and Co.'s factory, and Messrs A. and T. Burt's works. ,Tho monthly meeting of the Tourist and Amenities Committee of tho Otago Expansion League was held in the league's office last evening; present—Messrs George Eenwick (in tho chair), F. H. Campbell, S. J. Collott, A. Bathgate, A. Moritzson, S. Thomson, J. Inglis Wright, J. M'George, and D. Tannock. Mr Lewis Hotop, secretary of tho Queonstown branch of the leag-ue, wrote drawing attention to the fact that it was tho intention of the Railway Department to discontinue the daily train between Dunedin and Queenstown at the end of April. It was resolved that the secretary bo instructed to write to the Minister of Railways expressing great regret at the retrograde move by the department. It was also decided to recommend the executive to make every endeavour, by urgent representation to the Minister, to counteract the step, and also that the Chamber of Commerce be asked to cooperate in the matter. Mr J. T. Johnson submitted a full report on the proposed Waipori road extension, together •with an estimate of the cost of construction. It was resolved that a copy of the report be forwarded to tho Minister of Public Works, and that Mr Johnson bo accorded a hearty vote of thanks for his full report. In an interview which he gave to an Auckland reporter, Mr J. J. Boyd, formerly or Wellington, said that one thing which ho did not find satisfactory on his recent trip abroad, was tho manner in which Australia got all the credit in tho English papers for the assistance that comes from this part of the world. The part New Zealand is playing in contributing , men and money is rarely mentioned in the Home papers, but Australia's doings are kept prominently 'before tho Engb'sh public. 'JPhig was a matter which ho brought under the notice of tho High Commissioner in the hope of seeing it rectified.

A further advance has, taken place in the price of factory butter, which ie now quoted at Is 5d alb retail. The cheese market is also very firm, with an upward tendency. A land agent's license was granted to Mr John Koy, of South Dunedin, in tihe Magistrate's Court yesterday. In -view of the fact that there has been a good deal of comment on the possibility of draining an area of the swamp land situated on the Kartangata flat, it is interesting to observe that a largo area of sv/amp land around Kaitaia, on tsbe banks of the Awanui, away north, is about to be reclaimed by a scheme which is being undertaken by tho Government. The Auckland Star says that when this work is successfully accomplished, a large area of valuable land -will be rendered available for settlement. Some 6000 acres belong to tho Government, and other areas privately owned will also bo benefited by the drainago works. Near Kaitaia the Auckland Gum Company is now about ready to start dredging on a swamp of about 1000 acres. Already a trial run has taken place, and holes mink have demonstrated that the gum is there. The idea of dredging for gum is quite a new ono, and the result will be awaited with considerable interest. It is somewhat unfortunate that now the dredge is about ready to work line gum market should be depressed on account of the war. Swamp gum in particular is affected, as large quantities of this article formerly went to Germany and Austria for the manufacture of linoleums. India's poor havo been" exceptionally .fortunate in regard to tho price of food grains during the war. AVheat went up, but did not carry other important grain with it. The Calcutta Englishman, of March 4, states:—" Tho statistics of the wholesale prices of other food grains for flio period ended February 15 show that rice, jawar, bajra, and maize, upon which, as is well known, a far larger proportion of the people of India live than upon wheat, are all actually lower in price than before tSie war broke out. Comparing the figure* for February 15 Trath those of July 15, it appears that rice has fallen in price by 5 per cent., jawar by 6 per cent., bajra by 3 per cent, and maize by 2 per cent., abb that at no period since the war began has the whosesale price of any ono of these grains shown any tendency to rise beyond the price at which it stood in July. The point 13 of importance, as it shows that the poorer classes in India, who chiefly use the last-named food grains, are not worse off . now. than thoy were immediatey before the war broke out." _ A stock sale was advertised in issue to take place at Waipiata on the 20th inst. instead of at Waipahi. The war is proving the greatest reliability trial ever held. The "War Office at nresent are practically only buying Triumphs, Douglases, B.S.A.'e.—Wilson, Dunedin.—Ad! Mollieons are offering another shipment of ~ Japanese hand-made hearthrugs, ■ size 6x3 feet, at 8s lid; perfect designs.—Advt. Fit for tho gods—a tumblerful of soda water flavoured by Wateon's No. 10 whisky. A. E. J. Blakeley, dentist. Bank of Australasia, corner of Bond and Rattray etreeto (next Telegraph Office). Telephone 185 a— Advt ' . ■ j 8^® 00 * , enr B e °n and mechanical dentist, 63 Princes street, Dunedin.— Advt Who is Peter Dick?— The most- reliable Watchmaker, Jeweller, and Certificated Coasuiting Optician, 490 Moray place (ofi Princea street), Dunedin. Charges moderate.— Advt

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THE OTAGO DAILY TIMES FRIDAY, APRIL 16, 1915. THE DOMINIONS AND THE SETTLEMENT., Otago Daily Times, Issue 16359, 16 April 1915

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THE OTAGO DAILY TIMES FRIDAY, APRIL 16, 1915. THE DOMINIONS AND THE SETTLEMENT. Otago Daily Times, Issue 16359, 16 April 1915

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