Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LATER CABLEGRAMS

ULTIMATUM TO GERMANY. PROMPT REPLY DEMANDED. LONDON, August 4. In the House of Commons, Mr Asquith announced that Germany had been asked for a satisfactory reply by midnight respecting Belgium's neutrality. (Received Aug. 6, at 0.10 a.m.) Mr Asquith said : " Simultaneously we received a telegram from the Belgian Foreign Minister announcing that Belgian territory had been violated at Gemmenich, near Aix-la-Chapelle, and penetrated still further elsewhere." Mr Asquith read Herr von Jagow's telegram, which stated : " Sincerely declare we will net annex Belgian territory. This is borne out by the fact that, we solemnly pledge our word to Holland to respect strictly her neutrality. It is obvious we could not profitably annex Belgian territory without making territorial acquisitions at Holland's expense." Mr Asquith continued: "We repeated the request we made last week that Germany shall give us some assurance with regard to Belgian neutrality, as was given to us and Belgium bv France." • ° * BELGIAN NEUTRALITY. APPEAL TO GREAT BRITAIN. PRIME MINISTER'S ANNOUNCEMENT. LONDON, August 4. ' In the House, of Commons, Mr Asquith read the telegram he had sent to the British Ambassador in Berlin early this morning. He added : When the King of the Belgians appealed to King George for diplomatic intervention on behalf of Belgium, which had categorically refused Germany's request for a free passage as a flagrant violation of the law of nations, his Majesty's Government felt bound to protest against this violation of the treaty, and requested that Belgium's neutrality be respected.

Mr Asquith then read the telegram from the British Minister at Brussels, quoting the'Crerman Note to Belgium, which stated that Germany regretted Belgium had declined the well-intentioned proposal submitted by the Imperial Government, and

that the latter "' deeply regrets that it will be compelled to carry out, if necessary by force of arms, the measures that it considers indispensable, in view of the French menace." GERMANS ENTER FRANCE. AMBASSADORIAL PASSPORTS DEMANDED. PARIS SHOPS CLOSING. PARIS, August 4. (Received Aug. 5, at 5.5 p.m.) It is officially announced that the Germans entered France near Eferry. A Cabinet Council is sitting at the Champs d'Elyeee. M. Poincare has signed a decree- declaring France and Algeria in a state of siege,, and this position will be maintained throughout the war. The German Ambassador at Paris has been instructed to demand bis passports, and France has similarly instructed M. Cambon at Berlin. Tho male population of Paris, between the ages of 20 and 45 years, is rapidly disappearing. Many shops and business houses have been closed. BLESSING RUSSIAN TROOPS. THE CZAR'S MANIFESTO. GERMANY'S " INSOLENT ATTACK.'.' ST. PETERSBURG, August 4. (Received Aug. 5, at 5.5 p.m.) Troops leaving for the fror/, 'have been drawn up all day outside the churches, where they received the blessings of tho clergy. The Czar, in a manifesto, says that Russia is related "by faith and blood to the Slav people. They had never regarded their hate with indifference, but a fraternal sentiment awakened with extraordinary force when Austria addressed to Servia claims which could not be accepted by an independent State. "When we took," he continued, ' the necessary measures and precautions, Germany demanded their immediate cessation, and, being rebuffed, suddenly declared war. "We believe our faithful subjects will rise with unanimity and devotion and repulse this insolent attack.'' BRITAIN'S DECLARATION OF WAR. OFFICIAL INTIMATION. MELBOURNE, August 5. (Received Aug. 5, at 5.5 p.m.) Mr Cook (Prime Minister) announces officially that war between Britain and Germany has broken out. SLR E. GREY'S STATEMENT. BRITAIN CANNOT REMAIN NEUll*.aJu. CANNOT SACRIFICE SELF-RESPECT AND GOOD NAME. MR REDMOND PROMISES HELP. LABOUR LEADERS' SUPPORT PLEDGED. LONDON, August 3. (Received Aug. 5, at 6.15 p.m.) In the House of Commons, Sir E. Grey ['spoke for 90 minutes. He declared that he was asked if armed support would be given, and replied that he could promise nothing unless he received the wholehearted support of public opinion, but told and German Ambassadors that if war was forced upon France public opinion would rally round France. "My own opinion is," he added, "that if a foreign fleet came and battered the undefended coasts of France we could not stand by with arms folded, dispassionately doing nothing." After detailing the negotiations with Germany, Sir E. Grey added : " I have said enough to show that we must be prepared. We are prepared.—(Cheers, lasting over a minute.) Messrs Asquith and Churchill have no doubt of the readiness and efficiency of the forces. There is only one way in which Britain can make certain of keeping outside this war, and that would be the issue immediately of a proclamation of unconditional neutrality. We cannot do that. ■ If we stand aside we sacrifice our self-respect and our good name throughout the world. We are going to suffer terribly by this war. Our foreign trade is going to stop, not because the routes will be closed, but because tjhere is no trade.'' Sir E. Grey concluded : "If the situation develops, as seems probable, we will face it. I believe that when the country realises what is at stake it will support the Government with determination, resolution, and endurance."—(Loud cheers.) Mr Redmond said that in times past when the Empire engaged in terrible enterprises, the sympathy of the Nationalists of Ireland had been estranged, but events f>l recent years had altered the situation. Wider knowledge would heal the breach, and Irish history had altered the view of the British democracy towards Ireland. He honestly believed that the Irish democracy would turn with the utmost anxiety and sympathy to Britain in every trial and danger. Possibly the history of 1778 would be repeated, when a hundred thousand volunteers sprang into existence to defend Ireland from invasion. Mr Ramsay Mac Donald said that if the Government confined the question to that of Belgian neutrality the Labour party would support it. '' We were brought into the Crimean war," he said, "because of honour; we were rushed into the South African war because of honour; and oir E. Grey appealed to us to-day because of honour.'' LABOUR OPPOSITION. FURTHER NEGOTIATION URGED. LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug 5, at 7.35 p.m.) When the House met again, Sir E. Grey announced the terms of Germany's ultimatum to Belgium. She promised the maintenance and independence of the Kingdom on the conclusion of peace, threatening, in case of refusal, to treat Belgium as an enemy. Sir E. Grey added : "I can only say the Government will take this information into grave,consideration." Mr P. E. Morrel (Liberal), speaking imid interruption, said that Sir E. Grey bad not given sufficient reasons to the House why they should- intervene in the war. Mr J. C. Wedgwood (Liberal) said that Sir E. Grey had made a wonderful jingo speech.—(Loud cheers and dissent.) Mr Harvey (Labour) appealed to the 3overnment to make a supreme effort to save terrible wreckage of human life. Mr Keir Hardie (Indepenednt Labour) said the House had unanimously passed a Sill to relieve the Stock Exchange, but lothing to relieve the inevitable destituion of some. Labour members would do ill they could to rouse the working classes n opposition to the Government's pro>osal. j

Mr Ponsonby, Sir A. Spicer, and Mr Rowntree (all Liberal members) made similar appeals for further negotiations with Germany.

LORD LANSDOWNE'S .COMMENTS. LONDON, August 4.

(Received Aug. 5, at 7.35 p.m.) In the House of Lords, the Marquis of Lansdowne expressed great satisfac ion at Sir E. Grey's statement upon which a united front might veil be based. In his statement rare courage was shown. "In

this crisis," said Lord Lansdowne, " we lieed not fear that any section of the Government is likely to jeopardise the country's security or reputation."

FLEET COMMANDS. LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 0.10 a.m.) Admiral Jellicoe has assumed "-command of the Home fleets, and Rear-admiral Madden as Chief of Staff. ARMY MOBILISATION ORDER. LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug, 6, at 0.10 a.m.) The proclamation mobilising the Army was read at the Royal Exchange amid great enthusiasm. ANXIOUS AMERICANS. WANT TO RETURN HOME. LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 0.20 a.m.) The street* adjoining the Atlantic shipping offices in the West End were packed with Americans frantically anxious to return to the United States, and fabulous prices were offered for berths. REPORTED NAVAL ENGAGEMENT. OFFICIAL CONTRADICTION. ST. PETERSBURG, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 0.20 a.m.). # Russia has officially contradicted the report of the destruction of the cruiser Lilian. Only a few shots were fired, and no casualties are reported. AMERICAN OPINION. SOLIDLY AGAINST GERMANY. AUSTRALASIANS VOLUNTEERING. NEW YORK, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 0.20 a,m.) Except in German-American circles, opinion is solidly against Germany. The Times describes the Kaiser as a pious humbug. Forty Australians and New Zealanders in Oakland (California) have signified their desire to enrol for duty in Australasia if needed. ,_ STATE OF WAR. LONDON, August-4. (Received Aug. 6. at 0.35 a.m.) A state of war exists between Britain and Germany. ' NEWS IN RUSSIA. BRITISH AMBASSADOR CHEERED: ST. PETERSBURG, August 4. (Received Aug. 6. at 0.35 a.m.) The Czar, addressing a crowd from the Palace, said : " We will never mate' peace until our enemies' last soldier has left Russian territory." Thousands demonstrated in front of the British Embassy, and Sir George Buchanan was frantically cheered on declaring that England was in perfect sympathy with Russia. GENERAL ITEMS IN'BRIEF. ROME, August 4. (Received Aug. 6. at 0.35 a.m.) The Pops has sanctioned the return of the Swiss Guards to Switzerland. MONTEVIDEO, August 4. The Bourse and banks have closed until August 8. A moratorium has been decreed at Rio de Janeiro, and the Ministry has decreed a business holiday till the 15th inst., and will ask. Parliament to vote a moratorium. / LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 1.10 a.m.) Mr Lloyd George announced in the House oi Commons that the Government has adopted a War Risk Scheme Sub-com-mittee for Imperial defence' to encourage' ships to keep at sea and preserve the food supply. It will come into operation tomorrow. The Incorporated Association of London and Irish Millers has endorsed the Government statement that there are ample supplies of grain, and there is no occasion to pay panic prices in the immediate future. i Sir E. Carson has advised all Ulster volunteers who are liable to be called out to respond immediately, as their first duty is to the King. -Several steam yachts have been offered to the Government for use as hospitals. CANADA TO PURCHASE DREADNOUGHTS. OTTAWA, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 1.50 a.m.) The Cabinet is contemplating 4 the purchase of three dreadnoughts now completing in England for foreign countries and presenting them to Great Britain. Colonel Hughes has announced that Canada is in a state of complete defence, the batteries manned, the rivers mined, and the cruiser Rainbow ready for action. Drews are being secured for the cruiser Niobe at San Diego. The British warship Shearwater has cleared for action, and fighting is reported bo be imminent. MONTREAL, August 4. The' steamer Victorian has sailed for Britain laden with reservists. Sir W. Laurier has agreed to the ibolition of all party lines, so that Canada nay assist Sir R. Borden to help the Mother Country to every cent, in Canada's rreasury. NIAGARA DETAINED. REMAINS AT VANCOUVER. VANCOUVER, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 1.50 p.m.) The Niagara has been detained, and will lot sail for Auckland. GERMAN STEAMER AFRAID. PUTS BACK TO AMERICA. DISGUISED AS A BRITISHER. % NEW YORK, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 1.50 a.m.) The •Kronprinzessin Cecilie has returned o Bar Harbour, Maine, her captain fearng capture. She has been disguised as a British teamer, but a wireless message informed ler that British warships were in waiting, "he captain thereupon refused to proceed, ill her lights were concealed. CRUISER IN THE PACIFIC. SOUND FOR THE SOUTHERN SEAS. NEW YORK, August 4. , (Received Aug. 6, at 1.50 a.m.) The* American battleship California re- , orts that the German cruiser Nurnberg as left Honolulu, supposedly for Samoa r the Southern Sea§.

GOLD FOR AMERICANS. PROVISION FOR RETURN HOME. NEW YORK, August 4. (Received Aug. 6, at 1.50 a.m.) The armoured cruiser Tennessee will fail immediately with a million sterling in gold to enable Americans in Europe to meet their engagements and Teturn home.

INDUSTRIAL AWARDS*

SUGGESTED TEMPORARY MOE FI CATION. SYDNEY, August (Received Aug. 5, at 8.50 p.m.) The meeting ot' the Stock Exch 'ommittee, held to-day, adjourned wit aving decided upon any course of ac "he Premier (Mr Holman) states that ably he will authorise the Govenio aspen d by proclamation Wages Ba wards, and also relieve the partiei ldustrial agreements from some ob ions entailed under the awards, usperisions will not nullify the gei rinciples of arbitration, but will pe f a modified application to suit the unistances of the times. .A meeting of tho Boilermakers' So« nanimously decided to suspend the < ime clauses in the various awards goi r)g the industry. It will do everyt 3 its power to assist the naval and : ary authorities in the present crisis. WAGES BOAItDS IN VICTORL NO REDUCTION OF RATES. MELBOURNE, August (Received Aug. 5, at 8,50 p.m.) The Premier (Sir A- J. Peacock)-si hat under no circumstances will W loards' rates be reduced. He suggest lecessity arises, to reduce the riumbe vorking days. GERMAN' STEAMER'S FLIGHT AND RETURN TO POET PHTTJ." MELBOURNE, August (Received Aug. 5, at B.fo p.m.) The North German Lloyd steamer f sscaped from Port-Phillip to-day. t irrival at the Heads she ignored the < nination signals, and a shot fired at ler bows was likewise disregarded, ■vent full speed ahead, and left the vithout clearance papers. A later mee stated that the Pfalz was returning. PATRIOTISM AND ROWDYISM DISPLAYS IN MELBOURNE. MELBOURNE, August (Received Aug. 5, at 8.30 p.m.) Excited crowds paraded the main sti until an early hour this morning. A : sf 300 attacked the Deutsche Turn Vt in Victoria parade, smashed the windi lit a piece of rag to represent the Ger Sag, and stamped on the ashes. A f of police used theit batons freely and d: off .the mob. * A crowd of '2000 gathered in Co. street and sang patriotic songs, mounted police were called out to main order. .» , Further attempts to attack the Get dub and Viennese Cafe were frusta by strong police guards. ANNOUNCEMENT IN AUSTRAL! - MELBOURNE, August (Received Aug. 5, at 8.35 p.m.) At 12.40, Mr Cook (Prime Minif received the assembled press represe tives and announced that he had reoe a cable message from the Colonial retary notifying that yar has broken with Germany. He also made publi message from the King to the Gover general, which was exactly similar to i received in New-' Zealand and publis elsewhere. SYDNEY WHEAT MARKET.. GERMAN VESSELS DETAINED / ■ \ ; SYDNEY, August i (Received Aug. 5, at 11.5 p.m.) Since the official declaration of war wheat market has been excited, wit] strong disposition to realise at substar concessions in prices. Old grain fell t< lji, and new to 3s lid. Nearly 45 bags were offered, but there were no ] chasers. The German vessels now in port ] vented from leaving comprise the Snma Osmabruck, Germania, Fiberins, Athene. TA&MANIAN MINERS SUFFER. GOVERNMENT AID PROMISED, HOBART, August I (Received Aug. 5, at 11.5 p.m.) The war crisis is seriously affecting Zeehan mining operations. Owing to closing of the metfil market? several mi have closed. A deputation asked Government for assistance by the porch of ore for cash or bonds. The Pren strongly urged the men to contii work. He oould not promise them mo: for banquets, but would promise tt bread and butter. cent, of assay value of the ore would, be vanced. DELAYED CABLE NEWS. , ITEMS FROM ALL SOURCES. GERMAN FLEET LEAVES KIEL. STEAMING WESTWARD. SYDNEY, August 5 (Received Aug. 5, at 11.35 p.m.) The .Nationalists have landed 10,( rifles about 20 miles from the Dub statioh. A diplomatic authority states that 1 German high sea fleet has passed throt the Kiel Canal, steaming westward. BERLIN, August 5 Authentic reports have been receh that the Russians have crossed th<) bori at various points. The Russian Ambas dor has received his passports. • ST. PETERSBURG, August 4 The churches are packed with peq praying for the success of the army. AMSTERDAM, August 4, Mobilisation is progressing smooth The authorities are prepared to open t sluices and submerge the country west Rotterdam and south to Utreoht. NISH, August 4. An engagement is reported at Valjei 50 miles south of Belgrade. It is report that the Montenegrin* are bombardi Cettaro. PARIS, August 4. Georges Carpentier's boxing engagemei are likely to be cancelled, as he is i quired to serve in the army. ST. PETERSBURG, August 4. Schoolboys are offering their services the French as diggers or for similar woi and devoting their wages towards the su port of reservists' families. A prominent Liberal organ has Volu tarily ceased publication on the ground tho necessity for a united Russia. A thousand women are replacing the m who have been called to arms as facto: work jib and tramway conductors. The Grand Duke Nicholas's appointme: as Gerferalissimo is weloomed. He conti bnted much to the recent military revivi He is a man of iron constitution and born cavalry leader. 1 , MONTENEGRO-MOBILISING. CETTINJE, August 4. Mobilisation has been ordered, and tl blockade of Antivari is expected. Antivari is a fortified town of Mont negro, 23 miles S.S.E. of Cetfinje.

LONDON PATRIOTIC DISPLAYS

THE BANK OF ENGLAND. EXTRA SUPPLY OF NOTES. (Times and Sydney Sun Service.) LONDON, August 4. (Received Aug. 5, at 6.55 pun.) A meeting of American visitors stranded in London appointed a committee to render assistance. The Bank of England printers are working 12-hour shifts, producing vast quantities of £5 notes. The issue of £1 notes is regarded as impracticable. The populace are snowing a wonderfully .calm and self-restrained spirit, but there is a resolute determination on the part of all classes. The cancellation of the bank holiday excursions caused huge crowds to gather in the streets, and war "specials" were eagerly devoured. As it became manifest that Britain would be entangled, the patriotic fever deepened, and large cOncoursesj were singing patriotic songs. »__

. FRENCH MINISTRY.

FORMER PREMIERS JOINING. '♦ THE GERMAN EMBASSY. PARIS, August 4. (Received Aug. 5, at 5.5 p-m.) The following changes have been made in the Ministry :—AI. Augagneur takes the Marine, M. Barrant that of Instruction, and M. Doumergue that of Foreign Affairs, leaving M. Viviani to direct the Government without portfolio.

Britain's firm word with regard to the protection of the North Sea and the English Channel 'has largely • removed the general anxiety.

Two hours before German Ambassador's departure, the American Consul took possession of the German Embassy, which will remain under American protection while hostilities last. 1 . THE KING'S PROCLAMATION: GOVERNOR READS THE MESSAGE. GREAT CROWD AT PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. DEMONSTRATIONS OF LOYALTY. CFbom Oua Own Cohrespondiut.J > WELLINGTON,' August 5. Events marched rapidly to-day. There Were no newspaper bulletins ot importance in the early part of the day, but the presence of the Governor, the Coinmanaant of the Forces (Sir. Alexander Uodley), and the naval adviser to the (Jovernm'ent (Captain Hall Thompson) at Parliament House indicated that some further'step in connection with the war in Europe was being taken. , At the conclusion of the conference with Ministers of the Crown, an announcement was made that his Excellency the Governor would, at 3 p.m., read a message from his Majesty the King. The 'jomuiunication made to the press was that the message. was an important one, but that it did not contain anything- about a declaration of war. This news was quickly posted at the newspaper offices, and was read by thousands of passers-by. There was a great deal of speculation as to the nature oi the message, and an hour before 'he appointed time the people began to troop along the streets and through the parliamentary grounds to the steps of the, Parliamentary "Library, from which some historical proclamations have been read in recent years. As the hour went past the' crowd rapidly increased, and there evident a, tense feeling suoh as is noticeable only upon historic occasions. The portico was crowded with a dense throng eager to hear vhat the Go- . vornor had to say. A considerable number .' had gathered on the roof of tho portico, and the crowd extended across the lawn down to Charlotte street. Just before lus Excellency,- arrived tho pupils of a girls' school dressed, in navy blue and wearing their school straW hats marched up within hearing. In the meantime a message had been (eceived by his Exoelleucy from the Sccreiary of State for the Colonies stating that war had broken out with Germany. Before 3 o'clock an assemblage, estimated at fully 10,000 people, had gathered in the grounds and in the adjacent streets. There was a full attendance of members of Parliament, both Houses having adjourned for ' the occasion. On all hands there was an evident; feeling of suppressed excitement and ' eager anticipation. His Excellency the Governor, advancing to the edge of the steps, announced that he had received the following message from the King: —

" I deeire to express to my people of the oversea dominions -with what happreoiotion and pride I have received the messages from their respective GovernIwents during the last few days. These spontaneous assurances of their fullest support recall to me the generous self•saorificing help given by them in the past .. to the Mother Country. I shall be Strengthened in the discharge of the great Tesponsibilitiea which rest upon me by the oonfldent belief that in this time of trial my Empire will stand united, calm, and resolute, trusting in God.—(Signed) Geobge, R. I." To this had been sent the following reply .—

"New Zealand desires me to acknowledge ydtir Majesty's gracious message, and to say that come good or ill she, in company with the dominions and other dependencies of the Crown, is prepared to make any ascrifice to maintain her heritage and her birthright.—(Signed) Liverpool, Governor." The reading of these messages provoked expressions of genuine enthusiasm, but a feeling of intense e3jpectancy came over the vast assembly as his Excellency proceeded to read yet another document which proved to be a cable from the Secretary of State for the Colonies: — "War has broken out with Germany.— (Signed) Habcotjbt." No sooner was this announcement made than a wild burst of cheering broke out. A verse of the National Anthem was sunsr, and cheers followed cheers for several minutes. When quiet was restored the crowd was addressed by the Prime Minister, who was greeted with cheers. He said: "After the very startling announcement which has been made by his Excellency I trust that we are all of one way 'of thinking—that the British people'and the • Empire are to-day face to face with the' most serious crisis ever experienced, in the history of the Empire, and we are confident that we shall come through successfully.—(Loud cheers.) We must take notice of the very earnest advice contain rd in the last announcement of the message from his Majesty the King. Wo must ' stand together calm, united, and resolute, trusting in God,' and I am glad to say that not only in New Zealand does this feeling of confidence exist, but it obtains throughout every part of the Empire. The whole British people are to-day able to present a united front to our enemies. We have done our duty on every occasion in the past when the Empire required assistance, and we will do our duty on the , present occasion in a whole-hearted manner. That we will be called upon to make sacrifices goes without saying, but I am confident that those sacrifices will be made individually and collectively, willingly, and in a manner according 'with the highest traditions of our race and the Empire to which we belong. We roust do everything possible to protect our country, and at the same time to assist the Empire. When we have done all that mortal man can do the rest must be loft to the Higher .Power—' Him who watches over Israel and slumbers hot nor sleeps.' My ndvice at the most trying moment is to kro>n cool, stand fast, and <io your duty to New Zealand and the Empire.' - "We will do that," replied many voices in the crowd. " I am sure you will," answered, the Prime Minister earnestly.—(Cheers.) Sir Joseph Ward then spoke as follows:— " I want to spy I _ believe firmly that out ■of evil good will arise. Everyone rpcosmisos the horrors of war, but a time arrives in the affairs of nations as of individuals when thev must fight in defence of honour and foT their existence —when the blessings of peaoe have to be foregone an'd all irrief that sacrifice of human life entails has be borne with fortitude and resignation. The locs of treasure w'll be ' stupendous, but thnt is a secondary consideration. Tho* British Empire is entering upon th« ffrentest crisis in net history. Her rulers have dene nothing to iprovnko or precipitate war. On the contrary, they have done nil that is humanly possible to avrrt it. Tt is impossible, in. mv opinion for Great Britain to stnna aside and- to M powerful frlendlv nations go on without her taking part. To have' dnue so would hsve been nr\ set of cowprdire—n thfoe unknown to JMtisben?, Penrt'e in nil pajts of the Empire at this grnv« iuneture wfll stand united and with nndoubV-"* m& and Inflexible determination. Wn must leave nothing undone to date** the eapo,

■which I earnestly pray, under the guidance of the Divine Providence, may soon be brought about j and that the outcome of this unprecedented struggle may ensure lasting peace through tho centuries to come. My motto is ' For King and country,' and this will be fervently breathed by the loyal people Of this dominion as it will bo throughout our widely scattered Empire. May God bless and protect the British forces on land and Bea, and make them victorious, is my earnest prayer." These sentiments were greeted with another outburst of cheering, and again the National Anthem wae sung, the crowd slowly dispersing, evidently impressed with tho seriousness of tho intelligence just conveyed to them.

Considerable emotion was manifested amongst the, crowd when the Governor read the message from Mr Haroourt stating that war with Germany had broken out. Tho announcement was greeted with cheers from a oonaideinable section of the crowd. These were rather feeMo cheers at first, as the people appeared, somewhat staggered, but after a slight pause they were followed by hearty cheers. There were many people in tlte crowd, however, who wero visibly affected by the gravity of the announcement.

PROCKEDLNGS IN THE HOUSE

THE EXPEDITIONARY FORCE. MESSAGE FROM MR HAROOURT. RESOLUTION PASSED. The House of Representatives met as usual at half-past 2 this afternoon, and, after some formal business, adjourned at a quarter to 3 to hear the King's message read by his Excellency the Governor. After these proceedings the House resumed at 3.45 p.m. It was private members' day, and the first order of the day was Mr Hunter's Gaming Amendment Bill. Mr Massey said ho had not the slightest objection of going on with the business, and if honourable members wished he would do so. He said that at that sitting of the House he had a very important resolution

to' move, a resolution that, ho believed, would be agreed to unanimously. He was prepared to take the resolution now or to deal with it at 7.30 p.m. Sir J. G. Ward suggested that *they should put the resolution through at once and adiourn for the rest of the day. Mr Hunter said he felt that after what had transpired that day members generally would not be prepared to settle down to business. He, however, would like an assurance that the position of his private Bill on the Order Paper would not be jeopardised by the adjournment of the House

Mr Maasey, having given this assurance (which was accepted by the member for (Waipawa), left the Chamber for a minute or two in order to get the resolution. On returning he said: "Mr Speaker, the motion I have to move is as follows:—"That in view of the fact that Great Britain has become involved in war with Germany, this House approves of the necessary steps being taksn by the New Zealand Government to have in readiness an expeditionary force. " It will be recollected,," the Prime Minister continued, "that when I was dealing with this subject yesterday I read a message from the Imperial authorities to the New Zealand Government in which thev expressed the opinion that th« exueditionary force which had been offered, subject to the approval of Parliament, by the New Zealand Government to the Imperial Government was not required at present, and I called attention to the significance of the two words 'at present,' which seemed to me to indicate that it might be required in the not far distant\future, and I do not say that we have arrived at chat stage yet or that it will come, but we must be prepared. To-day the following message came from his Majesty's Government: 'Though there seems to be no immediate necessity for any request on our part for an expeditionary force from New Zealand, I think that your Ministers would be wise in view .of their, generous offer to take all, legislative and other steps by whioh they would be enabled, without delay, to provide euch a ' force in case it should hereafter be required.—{Signed) Hahcotjrt.' I feel, Sir, that a serious responsibility rests upon you and the Government and you and myself in moving this motion, but wo have our duty to our country and our duty to the Empire to do, and it is quite possible— I won't go the length of saying it is probable—that such an expeditionary force as is suggested here will be required by the Imperial Government. So far do definite steps have been taken with regard to the raising of the force, but the motion requires very little elaboration or explanation from me. I would like to say how thoroughly I agree with the opinion expressed by someone yesterday that this is a time for action rather than for speech-making. We propose to mobilise part of the Territorials— I am not able to say at the present moment exactly how many, probably 7000 or 8000 men—either for service in this courtry or for abroad as the case may be. We shall ask these men to volunteer from the Territorials either for service in this country or for service abroad. They will volunteer for service on the clear understanding that they may be required perhaps in India, perhaps in Egypt, perhaps on the Continent of Europe. My >wn opinion is that in , case of the services of an expeditionary force from this country being accepted they will be required to take the place of regulars in some place where garrison duty is required at the present time. That is my opinion. I may be absolutely wrong. Whatever happens, I feel sure our men ( , will give as good an account of themselves if they are required, as they did in the dark | days of the South African war. —(' Hear, hear.') With regard to numbers, . judging from the experience of the last few days there will not bo the very slightest difficulty in obtaining any niuinber that we may require. I have had scores bf letters-—and the Defence Minister has had the same experience —scores of letters and telegrams from every part of New Zealand from men willing and anxious to volunteer .for service anywhere they may be required. So far as the Native race is concerned, and the Native race axe fighters to a man, I could to-morrow secure many thousands of young fellows, of that race who are anxious to fight for tha country and the Empire, either here or anywhere else. In saying that, I am, of course, aware that the Imperial regulations may prevent any member of the Maori race from taking service abroad. I am afraid that is the oase, but there is no reason why their services should not be utilised in the country of their birth. I do not think it necessary, Mr Speaker, to say more in support of the motion. I feel certain that the motion will command itself to every member of the House. I feel certain that it will bo agreed to unanimously. As I said this afternoon, wo have arrived at a very serious crisis, not only in the history of this country, but in tho- history of the Empire. We are all anxious for peace; we all detest war, but wc do not want peace unconditionally.— ('Hear, hear.') Wo do not want peace at any price; we want peace with honour; and I hope and believe that the war which has just broken out will not last long. I hopo that within a comparatively few months—it would be too much to hope weeks—the Imperial authoritiea will be able to announce to ii 3 that peace with honour obtains rigftt through the British Empire."—(" Hear, hear.")

Sir J. G. Ward (Leader of the Opposition) said: —" Sir, there is a time when there is no room for division of opinion on tho important proposal in this motion. It is in time of strees and difficulty that a practical offer of assistance, oven though it may not be required, is valued. And this will be v.ilucd, not only on account of the prowess of the men who may be required to go, but on account of the moral effect 'which it ivill convey to all portions of the world that realise what a widelv scattered Empire we belong to. It is only by solidarity, by union in spirit and in aood, that we can hope to make our position felt against what is going on upon the Continent. As far as I am concerned, whatever arrangements the Government may decide to make in regard to d : spatching an expeditionary force will receive loyal and hearty support from me, a 6 I am quite certain it will from every mombar of the Opposition Party.—(' Hoar, hoar.') I realise that so far an any force from this country is concerned it will bo a volunteer force. I also recognise that whatever the number may be that tho Government fixes. it will be over-subscribed by those, loyal and devoted men in this country, who are not " jingoists" and not anxious to participate in war, but are anxious to support tho prestige and power of tho country to which we are all proud to belong. "-r-(" Hear, hear.") The Speaker then put tho motion, and it was carried unanimously in silenco.

PROCEEDINGS IN THE UPPER HOUSE. (F' "n Own ronr.rcsPONriENT.) WELLINGTON, August 5.

When tho Legislative Council resumed its sitting after the meeting addressed by his Excellency tho Governor, the Hon. H. D. Bell read the messages received and despatched by his Excellency, and a was carried that they should bo recorded in tho , journals of tho Council. On the motion of Mr Bell tho Counoil then passed/ a similar motion to that carried * by tho House of Representatives with 'regard to tho possibility of an expeditionary force being required. Mr Bell then moved that the Council should adjourn till 2.30 p.m. to-day. Hon,

members wero aware, he said, that the House of Representatives had already adjourned till that time. He informed tho Council that it was necessary that tho Council should be in as constant session as tho exigencies of tho dominion, and, indeed of tho Empire, might require. He proposed, therefore, to ask Uio Spoaker on each day wh.cn the Council sat to resume the chair on the ringing of tho boll, and he desired that the Council's work of tho day should not be concluded until, say, a quarter to 10 each night. In that way, and at that time, they would probably know whether tho House of Representatives required their assistance in any immediate legislation, or whether the House anticipated its ttdjuoroinent. Ho trusted that he had tho support of tho hem. members.- (Applause.) Ho proposed to ask the C<"i:in<;il to go on with their business just as they had a duty to do, and without regard to the excitement or anxiety that must move many of them. Ho asked the Council to agree on quietness and confidence in their strength, und to allow the work of the country to continue just as if there was no such great disturbance of tho publio peace, and only so long as it was found possible to carry one their business without disturbance.

PATRIOTISM OF THE DOMINION.

OFFERS OF ASSISTANCE. (From Our Own Cobbespondkkt.) WELLINGTON, August 5. Offers of assistance from all parts of tho dominion continue bo pour in to tiho Government and to the Territorial offioere. It is impossible in the limited space available to" give a complete list, but the followmay be cited as typical examples. The Bealey Flat offer is probably from the tunnel workers there. The Otago Motor Club offer is typical of similar offers from every motor association in New Zealand. The Arawa tribi have also sent a message saying that they are prepared to fight in any clime as their ancestors fought previously for England in the Maori war:— Wairoa, August 5, 1914.—Th0 Prime Minister, Wellington. Tho Natives desire me to .transmit a translation of a resolution unanimously passed to-day amid enthusiasm. This meeting of Ngatikahanga Maori people express their loyalty to the throne in the present time of stress, and offter their services whenever needed in defence of tho Empire.—R. N. Jones, Judge.

Bealey Flat, August 5, 1914.—Th0 Hon. W. F. Massey, Wellington.—Fifty volunteers from Bealey Flat for war.— F. Tomlinso n.

Dunedin, August 4, 1914.—H0n. W. F. Massey, Wellington —The Otago Motor Club unanimously resolved to-night that the Otago Motor Club will place their resources at the disposal of the Government in the present national crisis, and if necessary will proceed to form a motor corps for servico abroad.'—A. E. Ansel!" (chairman), J. W. Thomson (secretary).

Hamilton. August 4, 1914.—The Prime Minister, Wellington.—A deputation of representatives of Efireka farmers waited on the president of the Waikato Winter Show with a request that the Government be approached asking them to accept in the hour of need a contingent of farmers for immediate eerviee at home qt abroad, mounted or unmounted, for any duty. "God save the King."—F. Ernest Smith.

Auckland, August 4, 1914. —Mr Massey, Prime Minister, Wellington.—Auckland Flying Club unanimously place tfheir homing pegions at Government's disposal—T. H. Dawkin (secretary. *

(P»» Uirrrrn Pbirs AssocuTtow.l WELLINGTON, August 5. To-day 100 ex-members of the old Naval Corps in Wellington volunteered for duty to man the forts and relievo tho forces already on duty if necessary. Wellington yachtsmen have offered to form a, corps of competent yachtsmen and boatmen to serve as a harbour patrol. Arrangements are being made for membems of rifle clubs to 'be formed into a reservo for the Fifth Regiment. GERMANS IN WELLINGTON. NOT KEEN TO JOIN THE COLOURS. (ST»OM OtT» Own OOBRBBPOWPIWT ) * WELLINGTON, August 5. The Germans in Wellington are not at all keen to join the colours. Some of them, state that they have been very well treated under British rule, and they would almost as soon fight for England as for the Fatherland. This feeling is similar to that which, according to a recent cable message, exists in South Australia, where there is quite a German colony. MILITARY MEASURES. STATEMENTS BY HON. MR ALLEN. WHAT IS BEING DONE. (Feom Otra Own Correspondent.) WELLINGTON, August 5. The Minister of Defence (tho Hon. James Allen) mado a brief statement last evening on tie subject of the military measures now in tram. Members of the Territorial torce who were willing, in the first instance, to serve in New ' Zealand, and who also would volunteer to go abroad if the Government , required them to do so, would be called upon to come out lor mobilisation. " We are not going to mobilise the whole of the Territorial force," the Minister continued, " although we should be justified in doing so, as war is declared, but 1 don't think that it is necessary at present. We are gomg to mobilise a certain number who would be prepared to go outside if wo wanted them to. They will be mobilised in the four districts." The Minister added that approximately 8000 would be called out,, and they would be assembled at some suitablo spot in each military district. Training would proceed all the time, and, in tho event of an expeditionary torce being organised, if tfft Territorials offering were not sufficient, members of tho reserve and men who had seen service before would be called upon.

"Very likely," remarked Mr Allen, "we may want some of those who have sgen service before, but wo must give our Territorials their chance. As far as human foresight can judge, we are making every preparation. 1 am at work now upon the cost of the whole thing, and 2 hope that, if wo have to send any troops away the whole thing will be thoroughly and completely organised in every detail of equipment, finance, and everything else."

As to the nature of the projected force, whether it would consist of mounted men or not, the Minister said that it would be of mixed composition, but he declined to go into details.

PRICE OF FOODSTUFFS.

SUGGESTED BOARD OF CONTROL. DRASTIC ACTION PROBABLE. (Fkou Octb Own (Jorbespondbnt.) WELLINGTON, August 5. In the House to-aay Ml- Atniure gavo notice to ask the Prime Minister wnat steps tno Government proposed to take during the present crisis to prevent the price o° foodstuffs, necessaries of hie, etc., being raised on the people >

iN'otiec was given by M? Sykes to ask the Prune Minister whether the Government wouid tako immediate steps to,prohibit the exportation of wheat and flour during tho present crisis, so as 'to avoid the possibility of a shortage of these necessary foodstuti'e? Mr bykes added that it was estimated that tho stook of flour and wheat now held in tho dominion was sufficient to meet all legitimate requirements up till next harvest. If tl.e exportation of these articles of everyday consumption were for the prose '• prohibited tho prices for tho same need not be unduly raised to tlio consumer.

Tho Prime Minister, in some subsequent remarks on the subject, said that he had been endeavouring to obtain information as to whether thero was sufficient wheat and flour in New Zealand to last till next harvest. Ho had not yet been able to obtain this information, but he had reason to believe that there was sufficient wheat and flour in. the dominion to last till next April. lie intimated that the Government was considering the question of setting up a board of control to deal with the question of increases in the prices of foodstuffs. Ho intimated that, if tho Government had reason to belicvo that any attempt was being nude to unduly put Up the prices, it was prepared to take very drastic action to prevent it. —("Hear, hear.") Sir J. G. Ward said that, if a Bill to that effect wore introduced, he was sure that it would be passed unanimously. A board of control would probably be necessary for the purpose of checking any attempt to take advantago of the war to make abnormal profits bv increasing prices, oalling in mortgages, chattels, and ordinary securities. Hon. Members: They are taking advantage of it now. Mr Massey repeated that the matter was being considered by tho Government."

STATEMENT BY GENERAL GODLEY.

SYSTEM OF ACCEPTANCE. GIFTS FROM THE PUBLIC. (Pta Unitit> Phksm Association ) WELLINGTON. August 5. Major-general Sir A. Uodley, general oflicer commanding the New Zealand forces, informed pressmen this evening of tho steps being taken to defend tlio dominion in tho event ot a German raid "Tho full strength ot tho Garrison Artillery," he said, ''lias been called out and mobilised. The men are now in tho forts. Volunteers from the Coast Defence Infantry aro being called out to protect vulnerable points. The proportion of the Territorial force which the Government considers necessary at this juncture has been caCed out as a volunteer force. The partial mobilisation that tho Government has decided upon Involves tho calling up at each, district headquarters of tho men required from the various arms, who will only bo accepted on tho understanding tliat they volunteer for service abroad.,' and will be prepared to be utilised for that purpose should their services be required later on. Tho men must volunteer for tho arm of service to which they now belong or have belonged. Preference will bo given to those who belong to the Territorials or who have served in the Territorials, or those with military experience in the order named. The ages must be between 20 and 35.

" Large numbers, of applications," the Commandant said, " aro being received- for service in the Now Zealand expeditionary force by the Prime Minister, the Minister of Defence, and by the defence headquarters. These are causing an enormous amount of additional work. They cannot bo dealt with by this office, and I would be glad if the following information were circulated in tho press : — " All candidates must bo recommended by the officer commanding the Territorial unit. If they are serving in the Territorial force they should apply to their squadron, battery, or company commanding officer; if they are not serving in tho Territorial force, they should apply to tho local Defence Office or to th 3 nearest Territorial commanding officer. Other offers of assistance should be communicated direct to the officer commanding the district.

"'The question of horses," Sir A. Goiiley continued, " is one in which some difficulty was experienced in connection with th'n contingents sent to the last war in South Africa. Some were privately owned, and complications thus ensued. At the present stage of the pnrtial mrvbilisat'on wh'ch has been ordered the men will bring their own horses, which will remain their property, but if there is at any time any question of these volunteers now being moboljsed leaving New Zealand, it must U" im-.lerstood that every horse used, in the event of the horses going abroad, w'll be th<> ;il>sotute property of the Government, to be used as the Government chooses. The Government will b6 very glad to receive gifts of horses for the service of those who might leave Now Zealand. The horses not presented w I' 've paid lor bv ce Government. " Numerous inquiries have been made as to the direction in which help and assistance to the Government can best be given in the event of a New Zealand force going .ibrosd. As these offers of assistance irade by the pnW'e w'll no I'ni'bt 'ncrea'o it rear be uself to have it made known that the following gifts are the most suitable*:—Horsess (riding, or half of three-quarter draught), motor bicycles, motor cars fa few will be required), saddlery, draught harness, grooming kits, blankets, stout serviceable boots of the regulation |bittern, strong Je:irher l.rafes and belts, canvas shoes, undere'r.-thing, sock;, flannel • sh'rts onrdis"in vests t'jweK l.andkerchiefs, hold-alk (knife, fork, and spoon), shaving outfits, bootlacc6, housewives (with thread, buttons, needle*, etc.), hair brushes and combs, soap, clasp knives with lanyards, and field glasses."

WHENCE THE.FORCE WILL COME. IFbom Our Own tloßKKsi oNr>B««T.i

WELLINGTON, August 5. ' The expeditionary force will be drawn in the first instance from the N.Z.R.A. and the Permanent Force, m a certain proportion, next from the Territorials (none under 20 years of age being taken), then from the reserves, and finally from those not in tho reserves who have seen service. The Defence Staff, from General Sir A. Godley downwards, has been doing splendid work. It has been at it night and day. AUCKLAND, August 5. Largo crowds paraded the streets to-night, and there was much shouting and singing. Tho declaration of war has been received with enthusiasm. NELSON, August 5. A patriotic demonstration took place here this evening. A very largo concourse assembled at a few minutes notice. Speeches ( were delivered by the Mayor, B-'shop Sad-t lier, and leading citizens. The British and French national anthems were played amid great enthusiasm. Five members of the Nelson Club have subscribed £425 towards the expenses of a Nelson expeditionary force. CHRISTCHURCH. August 5 There were further patriotic demonstrations in the evening. Large numbers of Territorials and others are enrolling for service in the expeditionary force. GREAT ENTHUSIASM EVINCED. CROWDS .PARADE THE STREETS. (Pi» DwiTin Prim Assocutiow ) WELLINGTON, August 5. Large crowds of people paraded the streets to-night, headed by a band. Tho demonstration evoked great enthusiasm. BLENHEIM, August 5. Tho declaration of war aroused a fever of patriotism here. Flags were flown, large crowds cheered, and patriotic songs were sung. Tho band paraded in the square in the evening, playing patriotic tunes. • WAIROA, August 5. The newe of the British mobilisation was received with a great demonstration. The flag was hoisted on tho hall, and tho assemblage sang " Rule Britannia" and tho National Anthem.

(Fbom Otra Own CrmTHtspoxnitHYl OAMARU, August 5. At the invitation of the Mayor one of tho largest meetings over held in Oanraru was held in the Town Half last night, the object being to demonstrate the loyalty and patriotism of tho people of Oamaru and North Obago. Although only two hows' notice was given after the publication of the newspaper, the attendance more than taxed the seating accommodation of the Opera House, with its seating capacity of over 1100. Tho proceedings were opened by his Worship the Mayor. The public san# tho National Anthem, led by the 10th Regimental Band. During tho ceremony tho table was draped with thß Union Jack by tho towj clerk, amidst enthusiastic applause. In addition to the 6tirring speech ihade by tho Mayor, the huge mooting wasladdressed bv Messrs Milner (rector of the Waitaki High School), Whitton, and Douglas. Enthusiasm was manifestly displyed during tho playing of the National Anthem, tha Marseillaise, the Russian National Anthem, and again the united singing and playing of tho British National Anthem. The North Otago Pipe Band gave its whole-hoarted assistance.

DEMONSTRATIONS BY MAORIS.

HAKA AT LAND COURT. (Peb United Pbess Association.) WAIROA, August 5. Tho Natives assembled at the Land Court to-day oalled on Judge Jones to explain tho European crisis. Thereupon they passed a resolution offering their services to the Government for the defence, of the Empire. A great haka demonstration followed. OFFERS OF MOTOR CARS. (Peb United Pbkss Association ) AUCKLAND, August 5. The Auckland Automobile Association has telegraphed to tho Prime Minister offering to place at tho disposal of tho Government 250 cars in tho event of an emergency ario--lll g' ' HAMILTON, August 5. At a meeting of the Waikato Automobile Association this afternoon it was decided to form a motor corps to place its services at tho disposal of tho Government. MOBILISATION AT LYTTELTON. QUICKLY CARRIED OUT. (Teh United Piiess Association.) CHRISTCHURCH, August 5. No. 4 Company, New Zealand Garrison Artillery,, mcbilised at Lyttelton this morning, and are to proceed to Ripa ; Island for active service at Eort Jervois. The mobilisation was carried out very systematically. Tho police and ofchor officials were on the Lyttelton railway station before tho first train left for Christchurch, at 6.40 a_m., and issued instructions to thoso who intended to take the train immediately to mobilise at tho drillshed. Tho defence authorities watched tho train leaving port at 7.20 a.m. and gave instructions to another considerable number of men, Within a few liours the full strength of the compa-ny had assembled at the drillshed. Leave was subsequently given till 11 a.m. to tb.oM> who required it, '

HARBOUR DEFENCE.

SHOT ACROSS THE BOWS. INCIDENT AT LYTTELTON. 11l couuu-'i.A'U 'vv.ia Uju regu«u.iK<iis CUDeellLUlg luU U'-UUlitw.' <J1 UIO ijytWil/Ull ilU.llbuu», Hio ursi hiim wua lia-u nom iixi Jcrvoia this ni'-inuug uu'oi><> Uie bi/ivs ot Uie coastal s>U..-aji)cr w o.u.hi,u, wuicii eJiU-ixii Uiu UurUulU' WILIIUUt tiUUJl.Vt.llg IKHiiL'U tO examination by uuj uuiccr uu Uiu oygnct appointed uy uie DuU'i.iv! xuum WiUlt OdJi LR.' UtjCUt'tdlilUU, it BUCUIA Utat WIICII tuo WiiKiilu was signtisu luuii tuo Harbour lioaixl's s.yuai &lawu;i at H.iiucriey Head s/io was signalled m the Morse cou« to wait lor til© Cyynot, with' a vww to being examined. liunc-u uaa taken, however, illKl tilO YValillt/U came su-aigut iuu> Uio IUU'bour. When sue iub abreast ol ivipa ls.ond tile deluueo authorities at i?oi% Jervois, noticing that no oiyuuis were being tlowii, iiidicauiii; that she had been ciearca by Uiu Cygnet, ured a shot iroui ouo ot the big guns acre*** her bows. In spite ol this the vvalcatu continued on her course, and, as no further shots wero lired, sue roaduxl LyttuJtoji without further incident. Captain Wills, master oi the Wakatu, stated that when lie lelt Kaikoura lor Lyttelton yesterday lie had not received any v advxces regarding the cx«uijjnation service to bo earned out by the Cygnet on inward and outward shipping movements. As no war signals or others were seen at the Adderley Head signal station lie came straight into the channel, as ho did every week. A small steamer carrying lights 'vvus aeen approaching Uie Wakatu, but, as it was not known what vessel she was, tho Wakatu kept under way, and although a shot or rocket was fired from Fort Jervois, the vessel kept moving until her arrivtai at Lyt> telton. Captaui Wilis also stated that he was under the impression that the Himitangi, bound for Wellington, had entered tho harbour not long belore him, and as that vessel could not be seen at anchor he presumed tliat she had not been stopped. The liimitangi, however, did not cu.ll at Lyttelton, but proceeded to Timoru.

"DOWN WITH GERMANY."

(FaOlt UIIB OWN Cu^HLSi'ONDENT.)

WELLINGTON, August 5. At the conclusion of tho reading of the King's message at the old Parliament House steps this afternoon a foreigner, Siiad to be a Dalmatian, who occupied a prominent position in the front of the crowd, twice caked out, "Down with Germany." THE SAVINGS BANK. REASSURING STATEMENT. (Fboji Ouh Own COHHEBtotiDENi.) WELLINGTON, August 5. A telegram torn ttyaney, published in to-day's papers, sUitea that the banks had stopped the payment ol gotd, tuid that paper money was freely, distributed. It was also stated that, in spite of assurances tliat there was nothing to fear, the rush on the Government Savings Bank continued, but the bank was able to meet ail demands. To-day I drew tho attention of the Postmask; i-general (the iiou. Mr Rhodes) to this mat*jr, with a view to ascertaining il there had been any run upon the New Zealand Government Savings Bank. 'Mr Rhodes, in reply to the question, said: "There is no excessive desire apparent on the part of depositors to withdraw their money, and I am glad of the opportunity afforded to assure die depositors that there is no cause for alarm. Their deposits in the savings bank, being guaranteed by the Government, aro as safe, or safer, than they would bo in any institution in the dominion."

It was pointed out to Mr Rhodes that there was power under the Act to requiro a certain uraount of notice to be given of withdrawals.

Mr Rhodes replied: " Yes, that is so, arid I have already this afternoon issued instructions under the Post and Telegraph Act to the effect that depositors desirous of drawing more than £2 por week must give the prescribed seven days' notice. This," added, tho Postmaster-general, "is really in the interests of depositors themselves, becaufto I am aware of the fact that in times of excitement money is nervously withdrawn and |yut in a stocking or a hole in the ground and frequently losti"

THE CHRISTCHURCH OFFICE.

WITHDRAWALS INCREASE BUT LITTLE. (Pkb Unttsd Press Association.) CHRISTCHURCH, August 5. The war has had practicitlly no effect on the position of the Post Office Savings Bank I here. "The withdrawals," said Mr Morris, the chief postmaster, "are only infinitesimally larger than tbo.se of tiie corresponding period of last year. iThere havo been one or two withdrawals by nervous people, but the great majority of the depositors are perfectly satisfied to lot their money stay in the bank. In the present situation is nothing to cause panic. The bank is really safer than personal possesion." TELEGRAMS IN MAORI. SHOULD THEY BE ACCEPTED. (Fkom Oujj Own Corrispondikt.) WELLINGTON, August 5. The question of wnether Maoris should bo permitted to send tuiegrams written in their own language during une present censorship was raised iu the irloufee this afternoon, by the Hon. A. 'I'. Ng-ata. He stated that he had received a telegram from Judgo Jones, of the Nativo Land Court, asking whether it was a fact that Natives must write their telegrams in English. i'he Postmaster-general (the Hon. R. H. Rhodes) said that the Telegraph Department was acting in this nuattor, under instructions received through the Defence Department from the Imperial authorities. The instructions were that telegrams must be in English or French. The Minister of Defence (tho Hon. J. Allen) said that this difficulty had not cropped up before. Inquiries would be made &s to whether facilities could bo afforded ior tho sending of telegrams in Maori so long as they could be interpreted at the office of origin. It was poss.ble that, even withiu New Zealand, messages might be sent which would be detrimental to military interests. It was very necessary that all possible stops should be taken to ensure that no message should be sent that would lead to any '"Ttrsnisation which might possibly endanger those interests. Mr Ngata said that it was jieirmissfble to send messiges in .French, and he thought there would be less trouble in New Zealand in securing an interpretation of Maori messages than there would bo in • getting French messages interpreted.

NATURALISED GERMANS.

WILL FIGHT FOR ADOPTED COUNTRY. (Peb United Press Association.) PAHIATUA, August 5. Referring to the war, Ilerr Carl Sauer (Wellington), musical adjudicator at tho local competitions, stated in an interview today that, he had lived for 12 years in various British countries, being a naturalised British subject. He felt, with all Germans who had lived under the British flag and enjoyed the privileges of English libortv in Australia and Now Zealand, that he would fight sido by side with his fellow men to protect the honour and uphold the integrity of these two countries, which he said, were the two most, precious gems in all the British Empire.

NEW ZEALAND ALLIANCE.

DOMINION CONVENTION POSTPONED. (P»m L'nitud Pnuss Association.) WELLINGTON, August 5. In view of the war crisis the Now Zealand Alliance Executive has resolved to postpone the Dominion Convention to decide on political action to a time to bo agreed upon later.

STRESS OF WORK.

THE GOVERNOR. (Fhom Ottß Own CrwFSPONntfNT.) WELLINGTON, August 5. His Excellency the Governor has bee particularly energetic in connection wit matters pertaining to tho present crisis, an very keen regarding all arrangements thi are being made, lie has also shown th greatest solicitude in assisting Ministen Knowing that their time is so fully ocoi pied with a double stress of work, *. h has oven gone the length of visiting th Prime Minister at his office and his privat residence when he might have sent for hii to go to Government House. THE MINISTRY. Tho Prime Ministor has appeared togres advantage in tho present crisis, and thoug ho must have worries from day to da he displays a cheery optimism and "ives th onlooker the idea that ho has at oomman more than an ordinary amount of reserv force, hia demeanour being very mvoh lik what it was during the height of the reccr strike. Mr Massey'e efforts aro being abl seconded by all Uio other Ministers Mr James Allen, in his dual capacity a Minister of Defence and Finance, has, c course, a particularly heavy share of th responsibility. PRICES OF FOODSTUFFS. IP*» Lumi.l. i-mi- .Hvicunoiil AUCKLAND, August 5. With the exception of flour, which ha gone up 30s per ton, there 'ins been n increase in the price of foodstuffs in Aucl land. There has been a great rush on pre vision stores during the past few days, man; persons laying in stores. WELLINGTON, August 5. Prices of foodstuffs to-day showed n further advance on the rates, quoted on th previous day, and; no action was taken b; merchants with a view of making increases In regard to flour, one firm which is agon for a free mill is selling at £11 per ton f.0.b., South leland, and is making 3 pe cent, on its traneactibns. The manager when interviewed, said be thought ther were ample stocks of flour in New Zealand The public seemed to have the idea tha things were going to be as bad (but he dii not believe they would be) as during th strike. In the sugar market there had beei recently competition from outside souroes with the result that the price fell by £. Ss a ton, but in the event of outside com petitors being unable to supply, the Nev Zealand price would in all nrobability gi back to the original level. The desire o merchants, ho pointed out, was to keej prices down. Sugar at £30 a ton was no to their advantage when prompt payment were necessary. The heavy war risk wouk make differences in the case of goodi coming from overseas. Merchandise nov afloat was bearing this risk, and even aftei the war ended there would bo a good quan tity of etock still on the water and bearing war risk. The loss so involved would pro bably have to be borne by tho merchant! themselves. There was really no reasor why prices should be advanced at present and be considered that tho abnormal de mand by the puplic for sugar and floui was due to a panic having- net in. " The people are making the prices th«m selves," said another merchant. "To allaj the unrest Mnoni? the consuming public il would be a good idea to ascertain what grain and pulse is in gtook. whnt the rate of consumption is, and what is tho approxi mate amount of'grain that can be securer by next March." As for sugar, he did no) see anvthing to hinder th" importation froni Fiii of the raw material for the Cojpnia! Sugar Company's mills. He conld not see any reason why the public should be anxious as far as most commodities were concerned. English goods might rise in price on s>o count of war risks, but he did not believe the position would be as bad as that experienced while last year's strike was on. CFbom ,Onn Owv PomiESPOKntKT) WANGANTJI, August 5. The Merchants' Association has notified storekeepers that there will be alO per cent. 'rise on all foodstuffs from to-day. GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN CONSULATES. NO OFFICIAL INSTRUCTIONS. INTENTIONS IN THE EVENT OF WAR. (Pea Unitid Pbess Assocutiok.) AUCKLAND, August 5. Official infonx.at.on that war has been declared between England end Germany has not yet reached the Imperial German Consul for New Zealand —Mr Carl iSeogner. He stated last evening that as soon as he received the expected telegram he would vacate tho Consulate and become a private citizen and a British subject. Discussing his position Mr Secgner said ho had not received any advice from' official sources during the past 10 days, but ho expected any time to be informed by cablegram that Germany is at war with England. His duty would then be to hand over tho Consulate, with all the official documents, to the Consular representative of some other Power, probably the Acting-Consul for the United States. '• Most of the Germans living in New Zealand aro naturalised British subjects," Mr Seegner explained. " Personally, I was naturalised 35 years ago, and on vacating my office I shall, of course, aesume my Br.tish citizenship. I shall remain here and give my assistance in a friendly way in smoothing any difficulty that may arise." AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. The position of the Consul for the Aus-tro-Hunganan Emp.re, Mr E. Langguth, has not yet been defined. " There is no indication yet that England is at war with Austria," Mr Langguth remarked last evening. " Perhaps her declaration will automatically have this result, but so far I have not had any instructions to close the Consulate; in fact, I have not had any telegrams from Vienna since Sunday, and until I do receive official advice I shall continue to act as Consul. Mr Langguth added that if ho is informed that a state of war exists between England and Austria he will hand his papers to tue American Consul. As ho a subject of Austria Mr Langguth will not, according to official etiqJbtte, be able to remain in British territory. Hcintends, however, to apply to the authorises for permission to remain in order that he may attend to his private affairs.

t AVIATOR'S OFFER.

MR SCOTLAND AND HIS BIPLANE. (I'M Ukitio Heiss ASSOCUTIOW.t CHRISTCHURCH, August 5. Mr J. W. Scotland, the Now Zealand aviator, has sent a telegram to the Prime Minister * offering his services and tho use of his Oaudron biplane to the Government. The! aeroplane, which was shipped from London by the Kaikoura a month ago, is duo here :n about a fortnight DUNEDIN MOTOR CLUB'S OFFER. In reply to the offer made by the Dunedin Motor Club, tho Prime Minister wired as follows last evening:—"A. E. Aneell, chairman Otago Motor Club, Dunedm,—On behalf of the Government, 1 have to thank tho Otago Motor Ciub for the telegram of yesterdiy, offering to place resources of the club at the disposal of the Government in case of emergency during tho present crisis. Please express to the members our high appreciation of their offer, and, should the occasion arise, you will be communicated with by the fence authorities.—W. F. Masaey." j

MISS MACKENZIE SAFE.

STATEMENT BY HER BROTHER. Mr D. S. Mackenzie, of Balclutha, son of the Hon. T. Mackenzie, states that he has received information to the effect that hi? sister, Miss Mary Mackenzie, who was reported to be missing, is safe in France, in the compiny of a Mrs Hope, though he has no definite news as to her whereabouts. DAY OF PRAYER. The attention of our readers is called to an advertisement by the Presbytery ot Dunedin, on fcho first page of our present issue, asking all connected with the Church, within the bounds of the Presbytery, to set apart next Sunday as a day of special prayer in view of the threatening aspect of affairs in Europe. The Methodist churches of Otago will hold a day of humiliation and prayer on Sunday. INSURANCE COMPANY'S PROMPT ACTION. A PATRIOTIC STEP. The directors of the London, Liverpool and Globe Insurance Co. have instructed their branch managers throughout New Zealand that in the event of any of their employees being called on for military or naval service, leave of absence will bo granted on full pay, and the positions of those offering will bo kept open.

PATRIOTIC DEMONSTRATION IN DUNEDIN. LARGE CROWD AT THE TOWN HALL. SPEECH BY THE MAYOR. Vivid recollections of tho stirring days of tho Uoer war were brought before tho general publio evening when a. great patriotic domonttration took place on the streets shortly after 10 o'clock. Headed by tho Salvation Army Band, a crowd of several thousand persons marched to the Town Hall, where tho City Council was hold lag its fortnightly meeting. The English and French National Anthems wore sung lustily, and vociferous cheering was indulged in lor some time, after which the crowd commenced to call for the Mayor. Eventually a deputation forced its way td the- Council Chambers in the mvlst of an important debate upon the future position of the city electrical engineer, with the request that the Mayor would address those who had assembled Mr Shacklook responded to the request and was met at the door by an impromptu guard of honour of Territorials, who received him at tho " present arms." and cleared a passage for him to the Town Hall stops.

Hie Mayor who was received with enthusiastic cheering, and with tho singing i ~ ,vo th<> Kin e," made a brief speech, all the patriot.© utterances in which were received with further cheering. He was faced with some difficulty, ho said, in addressing so large an assemblage on the burning qutetion of the moment without any previous preparation, but in the first place he could not help saying that the present orisa was not a fit occasion for jollification or anything else.—(" Hear, hear ) They were all true patriots— (applausc)—but no doubt they all regretted the position into which the nation had been forced. The crisis wa* a very serious one, and everyone of England's sons would be willing to uphold the Empire to tho very •utmost—(cheers)—and to lend every possiblo assistance to the diplomatic coders, and to the army and navy.(Cheers.) They wore all loyal to the King and to the Empire, and were all wiUinjr to do their very best to help the country out of the difficulties with which it was now face to face.—(Loud cheers.) He trusted the nation vowd rise to trouble, now

( .Further cheering „d the tinging ot God Save the King " followed, and after a renewed demonstration of patriotism the crowd gradually dispersed. Jr! c °n cl ' u 6ioa of the general buein« of the Oit y Council Cr Green snorted that a verso of tho National Anthem should d?atT g ' aD I-^ e . 9^^ stion ™ immetl Z» ?? IQd Wlth ' councillors standfflg meanwhile.

LOCAL MOBILISATION. VOLUNTEERS AND HORSES CALLED FOR.

ARMY COMMISSIONS OFFERED.

trict (Colonel Bauchop supplied us with the following part.culars, which fully explain the stops now bemg taken by the authorities to meet the situation with which the dominion is now confronted •- from U Ota d m ° n infantr y wi " mobilise Mn^l'iJ" 3^!" 0 s / ctl °** with infantry and also with mounted men One field battery from ' New Zealand quota from Otago. "«u<*uu t,3! eld *J°?P? <En«noers) and field signal m P and field ambulance Notice to military men, who desire to xhe procedure, «, there set out. Roughly the troops wJI volunteer through tneir unite and will then bo sent to £ reg£ mentalheadquan*rs. There they will bo selected, equipped, and subsisted under regimental arrangements. When these different sub-unite are completed they will be mobilised at Tahuna Park The General Officer Commanding has given leave to frontiersmen to participate TW& -T Cla i T ™" a orills under local Territorial officers, should they so desire. fn,™ h? 'T °? C l rS , ? f Territorial force bo willing to (help in establishing the camps for mobilised volunteers, , their services may be accepted, and be paid Territorial rates for the time their services may be required. J

DISCIPLINE ALWAYS.

THE FIRST-SOLDIERLY ESSENTIAL.

THE EXPEDITIONARY! FORCES.

THEIR POSSIBLE DESTINATION.

Discipline must be the first command, ment of the New Zealand expeditionary force, should it be called together and sent abroad. It has been suggested that in all probability the New Zealanders will bo sent to such a olace as India, to occupy the garrisons there and liberate tihe Imperial troops for service at ihe front If so, their eflicienoy depends on rigid adherence to the ethical code contained in the words "discipline audi "'obedience."

t , 1^ s , M ai°r Fulton, D.5.0., of the 2nd Mioorkai, who is at present in Dunedm, to d an Ota™ Daily Times reporter wine-spoke to him last night on the subject. He disclaimed all knowledge of the probable destination of t.ho troops, and had nothing to say as a soldier But, sneaking as one who has had a great deal of experience of the conditions of service in, India, he made a few remarks as to the probable value of the New /jealanders in India should thev be serlt there.

New ZeaJand is a temperate country," he said 'and a country in whioh one can live without taking the numerous precautions that hedge about one's existence in India, in New Zealand one may drink water with impunity, and alcohol may bo indulged in without sudden and disastrous effects. The social conditions regulate life .insensibly. But there are differences in India, and the climate is the chief of these Certain rules must be obeyed—rules which the New Zeakndor would never think of, and which would bo irksome and opposed to the desires of young men. It is a hot country, and tftere is thirst to contend with. But one cannot satisfy one's thirst readilv for water is a conunodity which is extremely dangerous, except in the smallest quantities. Cholera is the result of undue, indulgence. Then the native liquors may prove enticing iio tic New Zealanders, deprived of his natural beverage, water. But the ; native liquors arc dasastrous. They madden the brain, and their influence leads men to the dens where diseases lurk. That is Why discipline is necessary—discipline stern and rigid. Garriaon work wouid bo undertaken by the expeditionary force in India in the big towns. This would entail a code of obedience whioh would regulate the entire lives of the mpji.

The men might, perhaps, be sent to Egypt, where the conditions would be very similar to those prevailing in India, Of course, a large number of British troops would bo still left in India, even though tho New Zealanders camo to enable a certain proportion to go to the front Given plenty of discipline, tho New Zealand men should be able to take the place of the. Imperial troops in garrison quite efficiently."

Major Fulton spoke a word of confidence, curt and soldierly, but none the leas sincere, on the ability of the 'New Zeakmder to =!hako down and respond cheerfully to the discipline imposed. "Always," he insisted, ' discipline is necessary, and abstinence from water which has not been boiled, and also from alcohol. Three-quarters of the British army in India .ire total abstainers." ANOTHER SUGGESTION. NEW ZEALANDERS MTOTTt ATTACK GERMAN COLONIES. A close student of war. who was spoken to concerning; the expeditionary force, said th.it it w:is qtirt.r> j-oss-ble that it might be sent to attack the German colonies. su."h as German New Gu>noa and German South Africa. It misfit also happen that the British troops wouHi bo withdrawn from South Africa, in which case Australasians 1 could take their \>hco. It was quite- tx>B sible that troops mieht be sont to India from Western Australia, which was nearest to the crreat Empire. Then troops from other Commonwealth States might be sh-'fted into WrM-am Australia, and the of shiftin.fr on might end in New Zraland troops being- sent to Australia. TVs, of course, was ntire speculation. It was un iikely that the New Zoalanders we'dd b» sent to the front, or the Australians either" After all, it was a matter for very hiehlv trainedi troops in the European battlefield. But they were quite sir'table for the work in India. Should the hm trbeg break out in insurrection, indeed, the situation would b-3 more crave, for hill nphting was a specialised branch of the war game. But w'th the Imperial troops and the Sepoy* (who misrht, of course, be sent to the front), they should bo a.ble to hold thoir own. HUNT CLUB'S OFFER. Himt Club litw deeidied to Rend a tdocrnm to the Prime Minister offnring 150 mounted men from the club's districts (Middlemnrch, Milton. Taieri, and Dunedm).

COMMISSIONS IN THE BRITISH AEMY. Fifteen army commissions in the British regular army wilk bo offered to New Zealanders. Applicants must be over 21 and * under 25 years, on date of examination, and must be unmarried aaid pass a medical examination and qualifying theoretical test at Wellington. Military experience as a Territorial or cadet is necessary*, but candidates must be recommended as being suitable for a commission.

GIFTS OF HORSES. . The following telegram was forwarded from Wellington headquarters yesterday:— 'Please circulate through the press and in- •^ a i_ aU , conoGrned that the Government will be glad to receive gifts of horses for any .farce that may leave New Zealand, but it must be understood that if the force goes abroad the horsjs shall be the absolute property of tho Government, to be used as tho Government chaoses." THE EMPIRE'S PERIL. TO THIS EDITOR. Snt, —In tlis hour of peril it becomes the imperative duty of every British citizen to unite for the common protection .of the Empire. So far the Government has taken prompt action from a military point of view, but there is one other aspect wihich jas yet has not received that attention it requires. I refer to the evil aspect of our system of production end distribution, which is threatened with dire disaster. One does not require to be an expert in economics to see that the inevitable rise in the price of food and the simultaneous curtailment of enterprise will cause a crisis that must be immediately and effectively dealt wrbb if the British Empire is to emerge victorious. To meet this unprecedential situation there is but one course open to the Government, and lihat is at one© to proclaim by Act of Parliament a prohibition in the rise of the price of food beyond the cost of production. From an eoonomie point of view there is no impediment whatever to this step because., as tho cost of production has not been interfered with in the slightest, there is no justification—*md least of all at the present juncture—to raise the price to the consumer. I shall probably be told that the iron law of supply and demand is insurmountable. To this I say, after 25 years of economio study, there is no such thing as a law of supply and demand which determines prices. The correct statement of the position is this: that under the present system it "is the conditions of supply audi demand that affect prices of commodities. Now, it is only necessary to examine these conditions and we see that the only natural law fjhat coo- / trols and determines prices is the cost of production. There is no escape from this law, but while tihis is so, the community has the power at any time to fix prices at this limit. That no other law of rates is further seen from the fact that neither landlord nor capitalist is compelled by any law to charge rent or interest If tfiey chose they could let their land and advance tiheir capital at half the present rates without any serious opposition. It now remains to be seen how far out .statesmen realise the situation, and how far our loyalty and devotion to the Empire can be bjrougbt.—l am, etc., Atigut 5. W. SmsBTSEN.

THE WAR.AND FOODSTUFFS. TO THB ELHTOB. Sib, —We read in this morning's Daily Times of the "enormous" volume of business being transacted by the grocers on account 01 the misgivings regarding Hiture supplies, and ot tne! anticipated rise in prices of food generally. 1 tuink, Sn-, that people wiU have themselves largely to biame if, uy thus rushing of tho stores, they help to - increase the coot of tho* necessaries of life. Such a policy may be all very well tor the time being, but it is short-sighted and selfish in the extreme, as it means high prices for those who are soo poor to lay hi large supplies, and who are therefore bound to suffer through the action of those who are better off. I am very pleased to see notice of questions in the House as to what steps are N being taken by the Government in ordtr to secure an adequate supply of food commodities for the people ot the dominion at reasonable cost, and I hope, Sir, you will do all in your power to promote this matter. And also to allay any panic there may bo in regard to the likelihood of stores running up to famine prices. New Zealand is able to produoo ample food of all kinds to supply its inhabitants, aad there need be no fear of shortage if people keep calm and ■ act wisely and unselfishly.—-I am, etc., W. F. Kennedx. • 1 Bishop's place, Dunedin, August 5.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19140806.2.39

Bibliographic details

LATER CABLEGRAMS, Otago Daily Times, Issue 16145, 6 August 1914

Word Count
13,383

LATER CABLEGRAMS Otago Daily Times, Issue 16145, 6 August 1914

Working