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ASSASSINATION

AUSTRIAN HEIR PRESUMPTIVE SHOT

HIS WIEE ALSO KILLED

ATTEMPT WITH A BO^IB

FAILS

SHOT WITH AN AUTOMATIC

PISTOL

FATAL EFFECTS FOLLOW

QUICKLY

CRIME ATTRIBUTED TO

PAN-SERBS

Pre«s Association—By Tehgriph—Copyright

LONDON, June 28.

Hauler's Vienna correspondent advises that-the Archduke Franz "Ferdinand, Heir Presumptive to the Austrian Throne, and his wife have been assassinated at Sera jevo.

VIENNA, June 28.

The Royal couple were driving in the streets, when a student shot at them with a revolver.

Both died in a few minutes. The assassin is a Servian student, aged

18 He had been banished from Bosnia. . Before firing he threw a bomb that -was resultless. ,

An unexploded bomb ,was found a few yards from the scene of the assassination, indicating that a third attempt would have been made in the event of the others proving 'unsuccessful.

DETAILS OF THE CRIME,

A DARING DEED,

YOUNG STUDENT THE SHOOTER.

BOTH ASSAILANTS ARRESTED

NEARLY LYNCHED BY THE CROWD

SERAJEVO, June 29.

(Received June 29, at 5 p.m.)

Gabrienovic, a compositor, who threw the bomb, belonged to Trebinje. He was arrested. Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife continued on their way to the Town Hal!, where, addressing the burgomaster, the Archduke said in a loud voice: "We come on a visit and bombs are thrown; it is infamous."

After a brief reception, while the Archduke and his wife were proceeding towards the military hospital, whither a wounded, aide-de-camp had been conveyed, Prinzip, a Servian student at the High School, dashed forward and fired two shots from a Browning pistol. The first shot hit the Duches3 on the right side of the body and the second struck the Archduke Francis in the throaty severing the carotid artery. The Duchess fainted and fell at her husband's knees, and the Archduke became unconscious. They were conveyed to Konak, but both had meanwhile succumbed.

The two criminals were almost lynched.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS,

PERSONALITY, OF THE ASSASSIN,

INTENDED TO KILL SOME EMINENT

PERSONAGE.

SHOTS FIRED AT CLOSE RANGE,

SERAJEVO, June 29. (Received June 29, at 10 p.m.)

The Archdnke Francis and his wife, while motoring from the barracks to the Town Hall stopped outside the Girls' High School. They had re-started, when Cabrinovic's bomb struck the back of the car, and, falling behind it, exploded under the second car, containing the Archduke's suite. Colonel Merizzo, one of the occupants, was wounded in the neck. The Archduke stopped the car, and, learning what had happened, proceeded.

The. pair were ova-tioned with enthusiasm along the route because they had escaped assassination. News of the event had already spread among the crowd,"and when the burgomaster began his address, the Archduke sharply interrupted as stated above, adding, "It is an amazing indignity." He then said, after a pause, "Now you may speak.''

The Archduke, responding to the burgomaster's address, acknowledged the loyal demonstrations of the populace, describing it as an expression of joy at the failure of the attempt.

Although agitated, the pair lost no time in driving to the hospital, when Prmzip consummated the crime.

The Governor, who was in the Archr was uninjured. Gavrulo Prinzip is a Serb. He was born at Grahovo, and studied for some time at Belgrade. When interrogated, he declared that for a long time he had intended to kill some eminent personage from nationalist motives. He fired when the car was slackening in order to turn into FTanz Josef street. As the Duchess was in the car he hesitated a moment, then quickly fired two shots. He denies having accomplices. He stood at. the corner of the street with hi 3 hand in his pocket, and was able to fire at close range owing to the. narrowness of the thoroughfare. TOUR OF DECEASED ROYALTIES. THE ABORTIVE BOMB ATTEMPT. VIENNA, June 28. As Inspector-general of the Monarchy's Land and Sea Forces, the Archduke Franz Ferdinand voyaged aboard the dreadnought Viribus Unitis from Trieste to Metvovic

He was welcomed at Mostar, where, in deference to local susceptibilities, when responding to the mayoral address, he spoke partly in German, but chiefly in the Serb. Afterwards he proceeded to the army headquarters near Serajevo, with a view to attending the manoeuvres in the mountans to the south-west of Serajevo.

There were two attempts at the assassination of the Arcftduks, the first during the drive to the reception at the Serajevo Town Hall, when a compositor threw at the Royal carriage what is called a bottle bomb, filled with nails and lead filings.

This did not explode until the car had passed, but the explosion was very violent, the' fragments piercing the iron shutters of many shops in the vicinity. ■

Twenty persons, including many members of the Royal suite and several women and children, were slightly injured.

THE EMPEROR'S DISTRESS. VIENNA, .June 29. (Received June 29, at 5 p.m.)

The Emperor Franz Joseph is at.lschl. He is profoundly distressed by the tragedy, and is returning to the Palace of Schoenbrunn, in Vienna.

SENSATION IN LONDON.

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS CANCELLED

LONDON, June 28. A painful sensation was causeq in all circles in London by receipt of itews of the tragedy. s The deepest sympathy is

expressed with the aged Emperor, whom the assassin had again afflicted. King George and the Kaiser have forwarded touching messages of condolence. All Court functions in London and all fetes at Kiel have been cancelled. All the Governments and heads of State are condoling with the Emperor Francis Josel".

THE ARCHDUKE WARNED.

CRIME ATTRIBUTED TO PAN-SERBS

VIENNA, June 28.

In some circles the assassination is attributed to pan-Servian agitators. The Archduke was forewarned of danger from Serigloo, where numerous political incendiaries were arrested during the past

few davs,

THE BOMB-THROWER

DENIES HAVING ACCOMPLICES,

.SERAJEVO, -nine 29 (Received June 29, at 10.55 p.m.)

Hodeljko Grabinovic declared that he ieceived the bomb from Anarchists at Belgrade, but he did not know their names. He dso denies that he had any accomplices. After throwing the bomb he jumped into the river, but was quickly arrested.

GRABINOVIC'S RECENT HISTORY. VIENNA, June 29.

(Received June 29, at 10.55 p.m.)

Grabinovic was formerly an Anarchist and -was recently employed in the Servian State printing works. He returned to Serajevo a month ago.

The first semi-official account received in Vienna stated that the ATchduke warded oit the bomb with his arm.

BREAKING THE NEWS,

"I AM SPARED NOTHING."

THE HEIR APPARENT

DECEASED ARCHDUKE WARNED

VIENNA, June 29 (Received June 29, at 11.15 p.m.)

When the news was broken to the monarch of many tragic sorrows, he became deadly pale, and murmured, " I am spared nothing."

Karl Fran2 Josef, the deceased Archduke's nephew, is'"now the Heir Apparent, He is a promising young Prince.

. It is reported that in view of the panServian agitation in Bosnia, efforts were made to persuade the Archduke to relin quish his visit. The Servian Minister at Vienna officially warned the AustroHnngarian Government of the existence of plots against the Archduke's life.

Several newspapers emphasise the fact that the Archduke had latterly inspired a growing confidence among the AustroHungarians, inasmuch as he approached great questions with (in open mind, and his many strong political feelings were modified.

Telegrams from all parts of the Empire report widespread horror and grief, coupled everywhere with spontaneous loyal demonstrations. ' ■' KAISER'S PERSONAL REGRETS. GERMAN INTERESTS AFFECTED. POSSIBLE UNEQUIVOCAL ■■■:.-■ -■■" ASSERTION. i.■ ■ . *JL ' ■ BERLIN, June 29. (ReceiveTr June 29, at 10.55 p.m.) The assassination has caused the deepest consternation and sorrow throughout tiermany. The tragedy is deeply regretted by the Kaiser, who had latterly established close personal and political relations with the Archduke, and would when occasion arose have strongly championed the claim of the Duchess of Hohenberg for a place on the throne.

German interest in the' Austrian problem will now be more intense than ever, and will possibly be more directly and unequivocally" asserted now that all problems regarding the succession have so tragically been solved-.

When the news reached Kiel the Kaiser was racing his yacht Meteor in a race. He stopped the Meteor, and she was towed into harbour. The Kaiser stood gravely silent at the rail, replying to salutes and an occasional cljeer. He will return to Berlin immediately.

CONSTERNATION IN ROME.

POPE'S MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY.

ROME, June 29.

(Received June 29, at 10.55 p.m.)

The assassination ; caused consternation in all circles here, and the greatest commiseration for the Emperor Franz Josef.

Cardinal Merry Del Val broke the news to the Pope, who is terribly shocked, and sent a long message of condolence and his benediction to the Eimperor Franz Josef, and offering prayers for the souls of the departed.

"BOSNIAN 'SYMPATHY. SERAJEVO, June 29. (Received June 29, at 10.55 p.m.)

The Bosnian Diet has passed a resolution of sympathy and loyalty to the throne. All the Deputies were dressed in black ; except four Servian Opposition members, who wore ordinary clothes. Thciv attitude aroused the indignation of their colleagues

THE PAN-SERB MOVEMENT.

AGITATION IN THE .BALKANS. ARCHDUKE'S PREDILECTIONS. VIENNA, June 29. (ReceiYed June 29, at 11.15 p.m.) Both desperadoes belong to the Serb orthodox faith and played leading parts in the anti-Austrian agitation. There are indications that recent events in the Balkans have rekindled a Serb Chauvinists'" resentment against the ■annexation of Bosnia by the Empire as a serious blow to the cause of a Greater Servia.. The surprise at Vienna at the tragedy is all the more jpronounced, inasmuch as the Archduke ! was regarded as favouring the formation of the monarchies of Southern Slavs into a third State on an equality with Austria and Hungary, and that his consort belonged to a .Slav family.

CAUSE OF THE TRAGEDY.

VIEWS OF THE LONDON TIMES.

LONDON, June 29. (Received June 30, at 0.10 a.m.) The Times says that the Balkan crisis of 1912-13 brought the Archduke a severe disappointment. Austria had assumed firstly that Turkey would defeat Servia, and secondly that Bulgaria in the second Balkan war would overwhelm Servia, enabling Austria in either case to intervene and secure a protectorate over the whole Serbo Croatian race. These ideas placed the Archduke as an antagonist of the Servian partisans of N the pan-Serb-ideal ; and the conspiracy of which he is the victim is possibly traceable to that antagonism. The new heir is not likely to tread in his uncle's footsteps. The tendency of Austria-Hungary will possibly lie in the direction of stagnation, while constitutional developments are likely to be steadier and the dual system to maintain for some years the ascendancy hitherto acquired.

THE BRITISH COURT,

A WEEK'S MOURNING,

LONDON, June 23. (Received June 30, at 1.5 a.m.)

His Majestv has commanded the Court to go into mourning for a week. The King and Royal Family are inexpressibly shocked by the tragedy. His Majesty has sent to the Austrian Court an expression of deep sympathy.

ANOTHER ACCOUNT OF THE SHOOT

ING,

V7OKK OF A ';S'SW SECONDS,

LONDON, June 29. (Received June 30, at 1.5 a.m.)

Gabrinovitch is stated to be 21 years of age. The Times's Serajevo correspondent confirms the statement that Prinzip threw a bpmb '-which did not explode, and that he then fired thrice. His first shot hit the Archduke's neck, the second his leg, and the third the Duchess's side. The victims on arriving at the Governor's residence were past all human aid. They received the last sacrament. The Archduke expired a few minutes after his consort.

Reuters latest Serajevo message describes the tragedy as the work of a fewseconds.

By tho assassination of the heir-presump-tive* (practically the heir-apparent; to tiio Austro-'Jriungaiian throne, tee dtiai Empire has been cast into tne throes that must accompany the settlement of the Imperial «uccession in limes of trouble. At any period this must have proved an awkward question to settle, but it is made doubly so at present by Balkan entanglcmicnta, with which Austr:an interests are inextricably woven. And there are internal troubles, too, caused by the clashjig of the PanGerman and Pin-Slavs aspirations, which, it was considered by many were only provented from oomiiiir to' a 'head by the strong personality of the reigning Emperor —Franz Josef. Concerning this monarch, Mr Francis Grabble, in a recent biography, says, " He is the one splendidly sane member of an eccentric and decadent house." His portrait k, as he puts it, a picture "not only of a great and successful ruler, but also of a brave old man tried in the fire, but not consumed by it, bowed down by sorrows, but not broken by them, maintaining' the mediaeval majesty of royal caete in tho presence of his peers, at a time when other Habsburgs—one Habsburg after another—were ringing the prejudices of royal caste to the wmds and making, as it must have seemed to him, sad meases of their lives, after the manner of those reprobate relatives who, oven in middle-class families, are spoken of, if at all, with bated breath."

The Archduke who has just been assassinated insisted upon marrying the Countess Sophie Chotek (afterwards created Duchess of Hdhenberg), who suffered death with him, but the aged Emperor only consented to the marriage upon condition that tho Archduke renounced for any children that might be born of the union,- the right of succession to the throne. Under these circumstances, the Orown would nominally revert to Karl Franz Josef (born August 1?, 1887), the eldest, son of the late Archduke Otto, who died at a comparatively early age as the result of dissipation. The lit-, tor, it is said,*-was the most amazing of all the archdukes.. • Ho was hail-fellow-well met with the common people, -who rather liked him because of his festive buffoonery, and do not seem to have been offended at his appalling lapses from morality. Austria was filled for a whiln with stories of his misdeeds. He is said to have got drunk on more than one occasion, in a fashionable cafe, and then to have executed a dance there, apparelled in nothing except a kepi, a sword belt, and a pair of gloves. What the character of tihe young man, his son (who is in his 27th year) may be, we have no means of knowing, but his parentage is certainly not : in his favour. According to the law of primogeniture, the Crown should on the death of the present Emperor—who is in his 84th year—pass to this prince, but when Franz Josef was aoclaimed Emperor, as being the sanest and strongest of the Habsburg-Lorraines. it was after his uncle had abdicated and his father had renounced all claim to the crowd. AustriaHungary, iyir Gribblo asserts, "has only a small Teuton nuclous, associated with a Magyar nucleus nearly ,as large, trying in conjunction with it to assert predominant partnership in a large and increasing community of Slavs, and casting envious, but not very hopeful eyes across- tho Danube towards the Balkan States and the j33gean ' harbours." Throughout the work of construction the Emperor has played a leading part, and it is only the prestige of tho throne that has made possible trje work accomplished. Another 'strong man is needed, and it remains to be seen whether those who govern the. destinies of AustriaHungary will consider that _ Karl . Franz Josrf possesses the qualifications for tho position, or they will regard it as necessary in tho interests* of the nation to cast about for someone else to found a new dynasty.

THE LATE ARCHDUKE'S DIARY. Edith Sellers, in a review of the late Archduke's diary, published in the Portnightly Reviow, says:r'i'he diary, which was originally intended only for his own relatives, was written by the' Archduke during a year ho spent in a journey round the world. This year was practically his Wanderjahr, although he was already a man iof nearly 30 at the time. In spite of the fact that his father was alive, he was even then regarded and treated as Ireir to the throne; and the Emperor Franz Josef was hard at work, and had been for two long, weary years, trying to fit him \for his future position; while Count Taafe, his Prime Minister, was striving manfully to render him popular. For, unfortunately, Austrians and Hungarians alike had begun by looking on him askance when ho became heir. It was by no', means his first journey. Already he knew Europe well, birring Italy,, of course; he knew tne Near East, too, for even as a boy he had a keen love of travelling. But whereas on his former journeys he had gone merely as a tourist on pleasure bent, this time he went as a future Sovereign, and for a,-pur-' pose. 'In many respects Franz Ferdinand is a true liabsb-urg; no one who gives even a casual glance at his diary can have any dcubt on this point. He is as firmly convinced as any old mediaeval Kaiser that between himself and mere ordinary mortals there lies a deep gulf. When, on board the Empress of India, he found that he, as every other passenger, was numbered, and might not sinoko where he would, his astonishment knew no bounds; and when, in a certain mammoth hotel, the fact was brought home to him that hf. must take pot-luck with German tourists and. sharo a room with men of all sorts and conditions, liis astonishment was turned into dismay. For he stands aloof instinctively from the great mass of his follows, and shrinks from all intercourse with them. Nor is it only in his exclusiveness that ho, is a Habsburg. His father, the Archduke Karl Ludwig, was always regarded, both in Vienna and Budapest, as an anachronism. " Had he lived in the fourteenth century he would have made an ideal Sovereign," his brother's subjects used to say; ju?t here and there iu this diary, there are remarks which seem to show that Franz Ferdinand himself is more in sympathy with the past than the present, the East than the West.

Although unmistakably a Habsbu'rg, Franz Ferdinand is one of tho Josef II type. This, too, a casual glance at his diary is enough to nrove. If ho feels that he is not as other men, he feels also, and still more strongly, that he owes not less than other men to his fellows, but infinitely more. Wherever he went, when on his travels, ho war/on tho watch to s?e how the poor were cared for. lie might perhaps have forgiven the Americans for being a parvenu nation had he not found, or thought he found, when among them, that they trampled on the needy with callous indifference, Ho never writes in a martial strain ; there is no touch of the war spirit in his book, no touch of craving for military glory, no clashing <A arms or trumpeting. On' the contrary, when he deals with things military, he does so in a plain, busi-ness-like fashion, and keeps to facts. None the less, no one can read his book without realising that he is a soldier at heart. , Thus a new state of things may be expected in Austro-Hungary- when Franz Ferdinand is Emperor-King—a state of things in which capitalists may fare worse than they fare now, while the working classes will fare tetter. For if we judge him by hie diary, he will be no roi faineant; he will rule, as well as govern; and, in ruling, will make the welfare of the masses his first consideration; first, at any rate, after the honour and glory of Austro-Hungary. Perhaps ho may even venture to try tho experiment of framing a modern State as States were framed in mediaeval, patriarchal days. For it is not altogether without reason, quite apart, from what he says in hig book, that the Christian Socialists of Austria count him as one of themselves, and hope for great things from him in the way of righting wrongs. Still, the Archduke is a patriot, before ho is anything else, if-, must not be forgotten; whatever experi-

monts ha may be tempted into trying, he will therefore try only in so far as they din bo tried without "detriment to AustroHungary. His love of his country is much too intense for him ever wittingly to do anything that would entail in it sacrifices. Of this he has already given proof. For although personally he is mare in sympathy with Franco than with Germany, politically he supports the Triple Alliance as staunchly as the Emperor Franz Josef himself; and he will no doubt continue to support it, so long as it is lo the interest ofiiis country to do eo. Then he Ims a sincere friendship for Tsar Nicholas, and for years cherished the hope of an Austro-Russian alliance. None the lr.ss. he sacrificed Nicholas ruthlessly and with him all chance of this alliance the day the fact was brought, home to him that Russia barred Austria's" way in the Balkans. Ho is a practical statesman now, whatever he was 18 yenrs ago, a statesman with ambitions too; lie has set his heart on A'ustro-Hungary playing a groat role in tho world; and so far as in him lies he will sec to it assuredly that play it she does.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19140630.2.24

Bibliographic details

ASSASSINATION, Otago Daily Times, Issue 16113, 30 June 1914

Word Count
3,509

ASSASSINATION Otago Daily Times, Issue 16113, 30 June 1914

Working