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SUNDAY CIRCLE.

RELIGIOUS READLN

DEVOTIONAL. Just fob To-night.

Not for to-morrow, lord, I lift my eyes Up through tho darkness which botweon

us lies; Not 'gainst to-morrow's terror, (nil, or woe; Not ior to-morrow's jov or glad surpriso— Just for to-mgfit When tho day breaks and far tho shadows

flee, Strength for tho conflict still shall come

from Thoo, I all Thy graco shall prove. Thy oomfort know; Oh, let 1110 feel this deep security— Ju>t for to-night. Peace—''tis tho gift Thou givest, peaco and rest. Como, bid mo droop my head upon Thy breast I S|>oak to me, Master, murmur soft and low, Flood all mv soul with Thy Communion blest-

Just for to-night,

Nay, I'll not'shun to-morrow's wild alarms, Storms, when Thou Fondest, I'll not ask for calms. Yet, I grow weary in the way I go; Pol undornoath tho ovcrlastine arms Just for to-night. SnrrLicATiON. O Lord our God, Who dwollwt in the praises of Eternity, wo tluink Thee that Thou delightest, too, in tho praises of Thine Israel. And though our tongues are feoble, our thoughts of Thw far beneath Thy majesty, and our hearts but llttlo aflect«l by tho greatness of Thy mercies, and tJm glory ot Thy character, vet wo would eomo. For wo have an altar, ami oven tho poor prayers that wo bring aro propeiittM unto Thee by our groat High Priest with tho much incense thnt Ho can give. So we draw ncor to Tlieo with lonlv acknowledgment of Thy great loving-kindness to us, of the loftiness of Thy character, and tho blessedness that Thou dost bestow upon us. Wo thank Thee for gifts heaped upon us undeserved, for long-suffering forbearanoo which cr.durcth, and is kind, soon angry. Wo thank Theo for tho_ coals which honeth all tilings for us, and is not of firo which Thou hast heaped unon our heads, and we befoech Then that, observing Thy dealings with us, wo may more and more understand tho loving-kindness of tho Loixi, and bo grateiul for all tho ways by which tho I/nrd our God loads us. Through Jesus Chrißt our Lord. Amen.

Meditation. THE PBEEHtXENCE OP JESUS.

"That in all things lie might have the pro-eminence. "—Col. 1-18. Thesa words dcGno the position of Jesus in all rotations and through all ages—llo tnust_ havo tho pre-eminence. Ho was perfect in character The highest achievement of any man is his character. Jesus Christ has loft tho world a character by common consent the greatest in history. There aro occasions when tho uoblest men surprise us by Boino unsuspected meanness or baseness. Wo get no such distressing glimpse of Jcmis. We too Ilim passing thiough ai\ evil world, touching tho evil at its worst, but contracting no dotilement. We seo Him lowly, despised, forsaken, maltreated, but He never fails to be tender, just, magnanimous, holy. How very imprcssivo this is! That a Galilean peasant of the first oentury should bo tho normal ideal of tlicso latter days is an astonishing fact. Wo havo been growing saints for well-nigh 2000 years. Wo havo had mon and women by (lie million, high-minded, earnest, most unselfish. but thero .lias boon no othor liko Him, and Ho was only a village carpenter. All that is bright in others slnnw brighter in Him. while thero is much to which Ho attained which no others havo Ho had not simply less sin and more virtuo than others, His supremacy is not comparative; it is absolute. Ho has,exhausted originality in goodness. All the goodness of other mon is only an attempt to copy His. Ho is tho onn perfect, the one stainless character in human history. And it is felt that, to tho end of timo, mon in quest of wrfeot'eharecter will too it as tho ( v look at the radiant figure of Jwus standing in the goldwi haze where earth and heaven meet—J., G, Henderson.

Exhortation. RELIGION TO BE SEASONABLE UUST' BE SUPREME, Thero is only ono lifo truo to liveonly one kind of life which is reasonable. " Seek first tho Kingdom of God and His. righteousness." Most pcoplo aro more or less religious—they put religion somewhere. They havo enough religion at timos to nmko thorn unoomfortablo; they havo enough religion to urgo them to do this or thut; they havo enough religion -to tako them to church and make them do ■ some religious practices; but none of these things can have a show of reasonableness if you begin to think. If there is to bo reasonable religion it must bo supreme, all-master-ful. Well,,my friends, men havo lived this life. I was reading tho othor day tho lifo of one for whom I had a groat admiration—the life of a very distinguished curgcon, Sir James Pagi it. Nobody can ray ho narrowed his life; nobody can say it was not full of all kinds of iiitcrcßt. But you con read his lifo-<uid I know him, and I know it is tmo-vou could not havo doubted what hii life was, It was a, lifo which had ono great dominating motive, and ho never would havo hesitated to sacrifico anything for it. Ho sought " first tho Kingdom of God and His righteousness." And yet this is thought for tho mass of men impracticablo. There is a certain amount of truth which I should liko you to face. I would have you remembor that it was not to thu world indiscriminately that our Lord spoke tho tremendous language which Ho spoke. It was to the Jews who had been in long and spccial training in religion, ami it was to special Jews—it was.to His disciples. 1 moan, as Jews they had been under tho discipline of tlio law—tho moral law, which, besides laying down the being of [!<sl, laid down specific prohibitions-Thoy should not," " They should not,"—and luul thundered from generation to generation thli divino prohibition into tho hearts of all jieople, and tho law was the snhoolmastor at the worst, at tlio lowest-the schoolmaster to bring men to Christ, Our Lord appreciated it very highly j Ho came not t3 destroy, but to fulfil. Our Lord spoke always with the conscientiousness of this training in tho knowlcdgo of the positive moral law. Hie Jews had been brought up in tho law undor the discipline of on extraordinary powerful social order—tho social legislation of tho Old Testament—as I think, ono of tho most interesting specimens of legislation in tho world, about- labour nnd wages, ami about the land preventing it becoming alienated 'or incorporated in few hands, All that regulation of human life was splendid and admirable, adaptoj with such splendid foroo to tho lifo of a young community. It hod laid its ordering, disciplinary hand, on generation after generation of tho Jewish race. Our Lord wanted true roligion and social legislation; He had presupposed all tho social legislation and the discipline of the law.—Bishop Gore.

ABOUT PEOPLE.

Mrs Booth-Tucker, _ of the Salvation Army, is very ill with fover at Simla. She lias had two months of continuous fever, and the last pronouncement was that hor illness was enteric. Tho last account wus that a very slight improvement hod taken place.

The Bishop of will visit America early next year in order to tyfco part in tho World's Christian Citizenship Conference at Portland (U.S.A.) Other speakers will include tady Frances Balfour, Professor Luzzi, of tho Waldonsian Seminary at Florence, ar.d Hev. Mcrk> D'Aubigne,' of Paris.

A nummary of the evangelistic oampaign held somo timo ago at Toledo, Ohio, by the well-known American evangelist, Billy Sunday, says that it 'astcd six weeks, in u specially-constructed Tabcrnaelo scaling 10,000 persons, Tho attendances worn very large, thousands at (iiw« lieing turned away for lack of accommodation. Fiftyeight churches-co-operated. The music was lod by a choir of 1000 voices. Over 7000 persons profes3od conversion.

Dr Lon Broughton preanhed tho first sermon in his now Tabernacle, at Atlanta, licorgia, on September 3. The building, in addition to an auditorium able to acoommodato 5000 worshippers, is fitted with every convenience for institutional work of tho most varied kind. At the opening scrvico tho hall was crowded in every pari, and thousands wore turned away. Tlio I lev. Silvester Home, M.8., was entertained at lunch by tho Clerical Conference of tho Federation of Churches at tho National Arts Club in New York. Dr llillis presided, and tho introductory address was given by Mr Silas M'Bcc, alitor of tho Churchman. Mr Homo preached ono Sunday night at tho Labour Temple, a kind of New York Whitefiold's, which is worked with great succcss by Rev. Charles Stolzle.

G FOR THE HOME

Dr Torrcy and Mr M'F,wan havo been holding a most eucorasful gcric* of meetings iu'tho Rotunda Rink, Dublin. They were encouraged by an increasingly largo andicneo anil evidences of the blewing of Cod ujx)n their work. Thoy wcro aided bv a Kind of workers and a largo choir, which led the pi'rtiso with much ardour and feeling. Dublin clergy of almont every Protectant, denomination ably supported tho mission

Rev. T, E. Zartmajiu, D.D., of Jamaica, X.Y., Icnjj associated with Dr J. Wilbur Chapman nnd tlte Evangelistic Committee of Uxi Presbyterian Church, bw accepted a call to the Moody Bible Institute, of Chicago/ Hi; nominal position at first is that of arcistant to the dean, Dr James M. Gray, but it is understood that ultimately he will becomo the executive head of tho Extension Department of the/ inetituto. This branch of tho work is inerminc its borders in tho rending out of mon and women ovangolists and Biblo teachers, and Dr Zartmann, by of his jictjuaintanco with church loaders and religions conditions, as well as his experience as an orgatiisor of conleronoes and campaigns, vili find ft wido field of opportunity.

FROM ALL SOURCES.

Tho Chicago Y.M.C. A. is making an effort to raise £125,000 for tho purposo of constructing a hostel capable ot accomodating 1000 men. Threo subscriptions of £12.500 each havo been promised on condition that tho total required is raised within a year.

Hie American Presbyterian Mission at Alahabiul is about to establish an Agricultural Department to its college. Two hundred acres of land Iwvo been secure! which will bo turned into an ngriculturnl college, experiment station and demonstration farm. Ilero it is hoped to give spccial training to three or four ctacs of men: to thoso who can take a full course, inclthling chemistry, a shorter class whero results are simply shown, and a demonstration class for tho illiterate.

A real agricultural setting was provided for a harvest _ thanksgiving: scrvice, held jn connection with tho parish ohurch at Solston, near Alfrcton. The scrvico took placo in tho well-filled rickyard of a farmstead. Tho vioar, the Rov. 0. Harrison, tho assistant curates, the churchwardens, and the choir, durinff the sinking of tho processional hymn: took up their places in a spaoo surrounded by lorn and hayricks and agricultural imploments. nnd tho vicar delivered his sermon from a farmer's waggon. A largo congregation, attracted iso doubt by tho novelty of tho servioc, was present.

Tho total outlay on tho buildings of tho new Wesleyan' Church Houso nt Westminster tins been £160,000, and tho site cost in all just £350,000. However, part of the land was fold for £200,000 to Messrs Holloway Brothers, who built on if that, fino office block known as Caxton House, leaving a portion still in the hands of trustees. The eliiof feature of the inside of tho church houso will bo tho great Congross Hall, which is not yet finished. Thero will certainly bo no other covered space in London better equippod than this hall for tno purposes of religious nnd philanthropic Mooting!. Aoouslio properties havo taon specially considered, Sir Charlos Stanford kindly giving muoh porsonal study to tho matter. An orchestral snaco for 100 is at tho roar of tho platforiti, whoro a onxit organ is to bo built. With its wide galleries, Uio hall will accommodate 2550 P™P>o. npn.rt from tho platform spaoo for 400; and in cast* of nro or emergency, everybody can bo passed out in three »•„ Under tho superjntondnoo of Rev. J. K \\ akcrley, services/will bo held rogularly.

. Th®ro is likoly.to bo a colour-lino division in tho Methodist Episcopal Church of America, and tho coloured pcoplo themselves will draw tho lino if it is drawn. A proposition is being e&rnratly discussed for tho union of tho three coloured Mothodist denominations in tho United States— the African Methodist Episcopal, tho African Methodist Episcopal Zion, and tho Coloured Mothodist Episcopal; and thd coloured conferences of tho original Mothouist hpiscopal Church appear strongly in favour of withdrawing from tiicir prosont white connections'and going in with this black union if if can bo effected.

Tho "houso of retreats" for Catholio laymen is now in regular operation on Staten Island, in Now York City. Every Friday a group of Itjymen from tho city and it« environs gathofo in this quiet placo to hear lecturw and spend Sabbath-in doyotion. _ Tho practico of wcek-ond vacations is growing among business men in all tho groat cities of tho country, but thus far no Protestant laymen havo proposed to dovoto this respite from money-making to the uses of their souls. Certainly hero is ono Catholic example that tho Protestant Church could vory wisolv adopt.

,i Dr Arthur J. Smith, superintendent of ho Now lork City Evnngdislic Committee, has reported that in tJio seventh season of tont, shop, and opon-air mooting* just closed, 1725 meetings wore hold in 99 centres, in nino languagos, with an attendance of 302,304, of whom 78,579 wcro girls and boys. Thero wero 386 children's meetings. Tho work cost about 26,000 dollars. Almost 1000 cards wero signod. One of tho converts who testified in tho Carnegio Ilail closing rally was I. \V. Warner, vico-pro-sident of tho C'oppock-Warner Lumber Company, Philadelphia.

t Tho twinty.fifth anniversary of tho Student Volunteer Movoment, which was atartod by Dwight L Moody at tho first student confcrenco ovor held, was observed nt Mount liermon, Mass., September 10. John R. Mott, who was a student delegate from Cornell at this first national interoollegiato gathering of Christian students, gavo a most interesting account of tho personnel, scope, and results of tho first session. This first confcronco was held in 1886, and was attended by 251 delegates, From tlicso delegates, 100 volunteered to engage in foreign missions. Now nearly 5000 volunteers aro in tho foreign Odd.

Tho population of tho world as to. religious belief is approximately «s follows; — Christianity, 417,000,000; Confucianism, 256,000,000; Hinduism, 207,000,000; lslamism, 177,000,000; Buddhism; 148,000,000; Taoism 43,000,000; Shmtoism, 14,000,000: Indaism, 7,000,000; Polytheism, 118,000,000. Of tho three leading croods above, tho fust is dominant in Europo and Amorica, the second in China and tho third in India. Buddhism is at its best in Japan. Wo do not voucli for tlio accuracy of theso figuros, but present tiiom as of interest and worthy of verification as far as possiblo.

The small and fast disappearing sect of the Shakers lias been brought into rocont prominence hy ft very peculiar incident in Florida, whero a colony of seven members, consisting of otio man and six women, are owners of nn estate of 7000 accs of tortile land. The elder at tho head of this colony is Egbert Gillette, and tho oldest woman is Elizabeth Sears. The youngest of tho sisters, Sadio Marchant, aged 34, had been for several years an acuto sufferer from tuberculosis. Regarding her caie as incurniMo, Miss Marchant requasted tho two seniors of Uie fellowship to "assist liit out of life," and after prayer Mr Gillette and Miss Scars became convinccd that it whs tho will of tho Lord that they should respond to their sister's ronuest. Accordingly, they administered chloroform, und llie sufferer died quietly. But some of the other inmates of the home appear to lmvo complained to tlio authorities, and lioth of tho aged Shakers have been held to tho grand jury on tlio chargo of murder. An autopsy showed that tho dead woman's disease had by 110 means reached a point of immediate fatality. Tho accused, however, still persist that they were divinely guided in the matter. The Shakers have historically been noted for their inolfonsivu and law-abiding character, and tins parti culnr colony is said to hold tho highest esteem of its neighbours.

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Bibliographic details

SUNDAY CIRCLE., Otago Daily Times, Issue 15298, 11 November 1911

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2,708

SUNDAY CIRCLE. Otago Daily Times, Issue 15298, 11 November 1911

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