Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SLAUGHTER OF THE ARABS.

MR M'CULLAGH'S PROTEST.

REVOLTING CRUELTIES,

LONDON, November 6.

Mr M'Cullagh, the Westminster Gazetto correspondent, returned his papers to General Caneva as a protest against tho atrocities that had been committed.

Mr M'Cullagli photographed many of the ficencs of horror, 6onie of which ore worse than any Russian pogrom or Armenian massacre.

Four hundred women and children and 4000 men, whereof not 100 wore guilty, were shot in cold blood.

Mr M'Gnllagk saw 50 men and children executed.

' A batch of crippled and blind beggars deliberately shot.

Sick people, whoso houses had been burned, were left on tho ground and refused a drop of water. . »

Tho Italian soldiers are paralysed with fear owing to tho enemy's persistency day and night affecting thei; imaginations and nerves. OUTBREAK OF CHOLERA. ITALIAN TROOPS AFFECTED. LONDON, November 6. The bodies of 50 victims of cholera ■were collected in the streets of Tripoli on Sunday, and there are 40 victims daily in the Italian army. A pestilential stench is rising from the casis. Atf EXCITING TRIP. DANGERS ON THE TURKISH COAST. MELBOURNE, November 7. The steamer .Berlin, from Smyrna, had an exciting time Tunning down the Turkish coast, where all the lights were out and submarine mines were scattered about on account of tho war. Tho captain, who has an intimite knowled"! of the coast, managed to steer clear of danger. VICTORY FOR THE TURKS. DERNA CAPTURED. ITALIANS LOSE HEAVILY. CONSTANTINOPLE, November 7. (Received November 7, at 9.40 p.m.) Enver Bey and the Senussi chiefs have telegraphed thai the Turks hav« eeijsed. Derna, and that the Italians lost 500 killed, numerous prisoners, and 18, guns. The Turks had 80 killed and 80 wounded. BOMBARDMENT BY THE TURKS. BRUTALITY OF ITALIAN SOLDIERS. WANTON SLAUGHTER. ROMfJ, November 7. (Received November 7, at 10.25 p.m.) The Turkish artillery bombarded the Italians throughout Monday, concluding with an attack on .the Itab'an left until 9 o'clock at night. Aeroplanes dropped bombs in the Turkish camp. Heavy downpours indicate that the winy season is commencing. The correspondent of tho Turin Stampa states that the soldiers. arc inebriated with vengeance. He narrates that after other executions a husband and wife, two splendid types of Bedouins, were led to a wall. They took ono another's hands and repeated a prayer. The soldiers then levelled their rifles, and the husband was shot, but the woman did not flinch. The order was given to fire, the rifles were levelled, and she was killed. Liter

sn old woman was shot after being charged with concealing cartridges under her rags. She was forced to strip, though she "feigned modesty in order to prevent a search. ITALY'S LAST WORD. The following is the text of Italy's ultimatum to Turkey. It was signed by the Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs: Throughout a long series of years the Italian Government 1m never ccased to represent to thu Porto the absolute necessity tiiat the state of disorder and neglect in which Tripoli and Cyrenaica are left by Turkey should come to an end, and that theso regions should be allowed to enjoy the same progress as that attained by other parts of Northern Africa.

This transformation, which is roquired by the general exigencies of civilisation, constitutes as far as Italy is concerned a vital interest of the very first order by reason of the small distance separating these countries from the coasts of Italy. The Italian Government, finding itself forced to think of the guardianship of ite dignity and its intere*ts, has decided to proceed to the military occupation of Tripoli and Cyremuca. This solution is the only one Italy can dccido upon, and the Royal Government expects that the Imperial Government will in consequence give orders bo that it may meet with no opposition from the present Ottoman representatives, and that the necessary measures whicli will be the necessary consequenco may be effected without difficulty. Subsequent, agreements would be made between the two Governments to settle the definitive situation arising therefrom. The Italian Ambassador in Constantinople has orders to ask for a peremptory reply on this matter from the Ottoman Government within 24 hours from the presentation of the prrfient document, in default of which the Italian Government will be obliged to proiwd to the Immediate execution of the measures dostlned to insure the occupation. '

ITALIAN ENTHUSIASM. The tirst Italian expedition of 23,ua, men was ready to eait on October 3 for Tripoli, aud was to be shortly followed by unoiher 13,000. The Italian naval squadron was concentrated at Augusta, near Syracuse, under Admiral Aubrey. Steam was constantly kept up in rcadmm to eail at a moment's notice.

{ Much enthusiasm was caused when tlio Duko of the Abruzzi left on board the cruiser Vet tor Pisani, irt command of a flotilla of torpedo-boat destroyers and to"-pedo-boats. , Cries of "Evviva It alii!" "Evviva Savia!" and "Evviva Tripoli!" wero beard on all'sides, and the sailors wero loudly cheered. The commandcrg of the naval squadrons at Augusta and Taranto wero in wireless communication with the fast cruisers patrolling between Malta and Tripoli, and were ready to reach the latter within a few hours.

. Although the situation was most grave, hope was still entertained when the last English mail left that a conflict would bo avoided. Notwithstanding the official denials, negotiations were proceeding with a view to inducing Turkey to agree to some form of an Italian protectorate over Tripoli, the sovereignty of tho Sultan being preserved, and a considerable tribute being paid by Italy to Turkey, instead of the risk of almost inevitable defeat and of the loss of Tripoli altogether without any indemnity. Italy took steDs to inform the Balkan States that her dispute with Turkey had reference to Tripoli only, and that Italy would oppose any act of aggression on Turkish rights and possessions in Europe. ARMS LANDED. The first Italian ileet of battleships, seven in number, were ready in the event, of hostilities to seize the principal porta in Tripoli—Tripoli, Benghazi, andDerna. The second lleet was to remain in home waters for service. Waralnpa villi the expeditionary force on bourd were 20 inues olf the coast of Tripoli. Panic prevailed among the Italian colony, which feared a Mussulman rising in the event of a landing by Italian troops. There was a condition almost amounting to an Italian blockade of the coast of Tripoli. By every possible means open to .them Europeans were hurriedly clearing out of Tripoli. British subjects who could not •"ay were hoisting tho flag over their houses.

i)erna, a Turkish eteamerj landed l(w soldiers and several boxes of ammunition and rille3 at Tripoli. These were being distributed to various points. The Italian fleet ?aw the l)err.a before she landed, but did not 6top her, though they could easily have done so. They were acting under special orders from tho Italian Government.

The Derna entered the harbour within view of the whole fleet, which had apparently been watching her for many miles. Tho news spread like wildfiro in tl»e town, and the Turkish soldiers especially were thrown Into tho greatest 6tato of excitement-. They ran down to tho harbour yelling at the top of their voioes and uttering threats and menaces against Italy and Italians.

STRANGE SCENES IN TRIPOLI'S CAPITAL.

ANCIENT AND MODERN IN CURI-

OUS CONFUSION

Tripoli lies far south of the groat Mediterranean highways. It possesses little natural wealth, and this, no doubt, account® for its having escaped the Euro, pain influences so noticeablo in Cairo, Tunis, and Algiers.

The capital ie crescent in form, being about two miles 'from tip to tip, and ono mile wide. The inside of the crcsoent is bounded by a magnificent bay) and the outside enclosed by huge ramparts, except to ttio south-east, whence lead the principal routes to the Sahara. Here, if anywhere, is a <uty of romanco. Pirates aud corsairs, doomed by obsolete Turkish gunboats and modern progress to idleness from their nefarious exploits, still throng the marina cafes. In blue zouaves ana looso baggy'trousers, faced with brilliant touches ot gold and rod embroider}', they remain at heart untamed.

A maze of narrow, winding streets lead from Custom Houso and ramparts to tho business quarter. High, white-washed buildings, quaintly corbelled projections, and perforated caseinaits, whence tlve harem ladies eee, themselves unseen, com-

bine in riotons fantasy of street architecture. Hera and there the street burrows through a house, or underneath a series of arches. So, by devious and marvellous ways, do all streets lead to the business centre, Sukil-Turc (street of tho Turks), which is half a mile in length, and some 15ft to 2Vft in width. Shops and bazaars occupy botW sides; VINE-COVERED STREET. Overhead, a latticed roof, densely overgrown with vines, runs from end to end. brilliant splashes of light flicker down on a moving mass of Orientals. Every race from Stamboul to Morocco is represented—Jews, Armenians, Sudanese, Arabs, and Bedouins bargain and barter in the cool twilight. Donkeys nose their

way through the chattering crowd, while beggars appeal silently for alms. One sees a Roman triumphal arch, solitary relic of a previous occupation, check by jowl with a barrel organ and a loud gramaphone wailing Arab dirges in awayside cafe. The triumphal arch has now lost ita pristine glory. Delicate carvings adorn the nurble capitals and panels; but th<y sand of centuries, blown from the Sahara, has swallowed up the lower half, leaving visible little moro than the semicircular arch. An enterprisng tradesman lias carefully boarded up tho apertures, and a first-rate dried fish and provision shop is the result.

Past the Pasha's Mosque, and to the east of the town, lies a long tract of sand, bounded on one side by the bay, and on the other by camel compounds. Hero everv Tuesday is held the famous Haifa Market. During tho night caravans havo been arriving from south and east. Camels laden with esparto matting and fruit have been unburdened, and formed into miniature camps. By early morning the sands have been converted into a market city, with a population of from 5000 to 10,000 people.

The permanent population of Tripoli eonsik chiefly of Arabs, Jews, and Turks, though there is a considerable sprinkling of Italians and Maltese. Tlio English colony numbers a dozen persons.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
1,704

SLAUGHTER OF THE ARABS. Otago Daily Times, Issue 15295, 8 November 1911

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working