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SPOUTING AND SPORTS.

THE TURF. , f liv Sentinel. 1 ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 1 C If., Tarns.—Boomerang wa3 handicapped t to carry 8.13. The highest weight successfully carried is 8.9. ( A. L. D., Southland.—The rider you name 1 is not likely to bo seen in the saddle again. j Quiry, North Otago.-Tasman was bred in ( ' Tasmania, and brought to New Zealand in 1880. He was foaled in. 1878. ( THE RACING CONFERENCE. j The annual conferencc of representatives of Now Zealand racing- clubs was held in i Wellington last week with Sir George Clif- 1 ford (president) in tho chair. There was ] a full muster of delegates, and several important motions, such as those which had 1 for their basis tho registration of owners, j I)je> appointment of stipendiary stewards, 1 lie appointment of a judicial committee, j that every programme shall include a. race of not. Icm than a milo and a-quarter, and , Ibo restriction of tho length of mootings, were thrown out, whilst a. proposal to appoint paid judges at all meetings using }ho total isator was withdrawn, as were also .notices of motion referring to the uniform measurement of raoecourees and tho sip- : poir.tment of a. committee to report upon tho possible reduction, of meetings held by registered clubs not entitled to use tho tolalisator. In fact, the additions or amendments which were mado to existing racing laws were small in comparison to the amount of .business on tho' list. Still it must be borne in mind that the copfercnoo is hold "for tho purposo of sifting tho grain from the chaff and not for tho purpose of passing experimental legislation which is enacted at ono meeting and annulled at another. It was not astonishing fo find that the proposal to lieenso ownors was killed, bceause it was regarded with n good deal of hostility from its birth. In tho first place, it waa believed to be unnecessary, and, furthermore, that it gave too much power into tho hands of the corninitice. It was no doubt lovclled at , tho unprincipled raoing man, but whilst it would in oases raissfiro. it unnecessarily harassed sportsmen of tho correct type. The motion gavo birth to an amendment, brought forward by Mr Samuel, which had for its effect that a committee of five should be appointed to overlook tho conduct of the eporfc gooorally, and to investigate and rojx>rt to tho conference on any matter whioh ■renders action by the conference desirable for the more effectual prevention of corrupt praotiocs in relation to raoing. Such a rule would baveoovered tho most desirable part of Sir George Clifford's motion and; at tho same time left out what was deemed unheoessarily drastic. There was no suggestion in Mr. Samuel's.. proposal that the committee should havo power to inflict disqualifications. That was to rest with tho conference, and by tho tiino a ease reachod thel governing body thero would not bo much chance of an injustice occuring. Mr . Samuel's suggestion, in tho opinion of the writer, ranks a olose second io tho appointment of stipendiary stewards, and although it was also defeated on being put to tho vote, it is a. proposal {hat should not be lost sight of. The air of our sporting world is occasionally filled with tho doing 3 and sharp practices of 1 eomo of tlio tlover division, but once tho curtain is rung down on tho particular meeting at which nometliing 'shady lias occurred, it appears to bo nobody's business to find out what truth is really contained in tho rumour. Ycrj few clubs like to be troubled with inquiries, and it is here that Mr Samuel's committee could do good work. The motion for tho appointment of stipendiary stewards wag thrown out on the Toices, although a. thousand arguments have been advanoedin favour of the proposal, whioh was probably killed bceaißo of tiro exponso it would entail. Honorary stewards should really wolcomo' tho stipendiary stewards, as it would bo the latter's duty to relieve tho former of all the unpleasant part of their office. However, the stipendiary steward has to go for the present. The compulsory appointment of a judicial committee of five, ipstcod of being optional, as at present, was also lost; and it was audi a sound and eonsiblf) proposal that it is a wonder it was thrown out. A commifcteo of five would be infinitely preterahlo to a long list of stewards (some of whom are not too expert jn raoing matters), whose very numerical strength tenda to mako the inaohinorj of racing law cumbersome and sometimes ineffective in its action. It is a slock boast that raoing is primarily conducted for the purpose of improving and testing the quality of the thoroughbred, and incidentally keeping up tho standard of tho' light horses, such as hacks, hunters, etc.. which follows in its trail. Consequently it is somewhat astonishing that a comparatively mild proposal in that direction, which would have made it compulsory for every programme to contain a mile and a-quarter race, should lio thrown out. It is possible that such a rule would havo proved a trifle hard on clubs racing ,on only one day a year, but .it is regrettablo that it should not. have jicon made compulsory for at leaflt ono race of that distance to bo found on programmes of meetings extending over two or more' days. Tho balance of the business transacted was comparatively mild in its object, and in soffio cases hardly ialLvfor special notice. THE TROTTING CONFERENCE. The annual confcrenco of the representatives of New Zealand trotting clubs was held last week in Wellington, wheh Mr G. Paiyling (president) occupied the chair. Nothing of any great moment was on the business sheet except the proposed rule which would have made it compulsory for trotting (5) clubs to havo at least one race per day for trotters only, but this was rejected on being put to the. vote. Tho cliairman, in his address to tho doleg&tes, stated that "steady progress has been the leading characteristic of tho year's sport, and those clubs affiliated to tho association, taken all round, ore in a flourishing oondition and on a sound financial footing." The statistics furnished with the report go to prove the; truth of tho chairman's remark, and, that being so, the rejection of the clause is all the more pronounced and unsportsmanlike. Tho principal opposition appeared to como from tho representatives of country . clubs, and this is somewhat strange, as tho' country folk havo more use for a genuine utility horse than their brethren in the city. In town there is some excuse for a paoer. as on good level roads ho can act? in a light, runabout trap with somo degree of success, but where solid' work has to bo done or a stylish, roadster is' required tho trotter is the only horse to fill the bill; in faot, the pavir is #• racer pure and simple, and of no use except for the lightest of harness work or ambling about under saddle. It is clear that tho commercial aspect of the question ■was the cause' of tho motion being defeated, and it is regrettable that a representative body of sportsmen, presumably ■with tlio true interests of the sport at heart, allowed finance to dominate the most important matter they had before them. It as not intended to unnecessarily di6parago tho pacer, which is in some eases V- natural, gait, but it is time tliat some' check was put on tlio ruling tendency to breed more gambling machines. Apparently uo attempt was made to modify the motion by making it compulsory for olubs holding two or moro meetings a year to provide Vaces for trotters, but it i 6 to be hoped that, tho clubs who an count thoir revenue by tho thousands will not always havo the stigma attached to thorn that they nuke the tnio interests of sport, subservient to mere racing and gambling.

—Tho New Zealand Cup candidate CrieMon has' broken down.

— Solution is doing very well in her preliminary work at C»ulfield. — Tho New Zealandor Swimmer fell early in tho Y.R.C. National Steeples. — Grand Stand. The Seer, and Strath- ■ Allan leave for Ric carton this week.

— During the past week Leesido lias come into favour for the National Hurdles.

— Tho well-known Gorton gelding Raw. more has been sold to a Mclbourie buyer. — Seamau has earned a 10lb penalty far tin "Winter Cup by Ms victories fit "Wellington.

—In Iceland horses are shod with liorn. *hiie in the Soudan they war socks of camel (kin.

—At a recent Ascot (Melbourne) meeting r rider's license was cancel-led for careless ri(]ing.

«-Sir Georgo Glifford has been re-elected chairman of tho New Zealand Racing Conference.

— There is a probability that the English Jockey Club will at last give a trial to the walk-up - start. — Jolly Friar has incurred a 7lb penalty for tho Winter Cup by his brace of wins at Wellington. • —Mr "Bos 3" Croker is credited with landing £40,000' ui bets over Orby's -win in the Epsom Derby. — Prior to leaving for Sydney, Mr J. Loughlin offered f6OO for Paritutu, but failed to do any business.

— "Follow tie money" is the usual tip when we gel 011 a racecourse. Most of us do to —and never-catch'it. — Ben Jonson has inouned a 101b penalty for the National Hurdles by his will ill the Fittill Jluidbs at Vflliiji'tou.

— The Turanville Stud (N.S.W.), comprising 120 brood inarcs and several stallions, is to be under the hammer next month.

— Regulation has incurred a slb penalty for the National Hurdles. This makes her burden 10.0 for tho Riccarton event. — Grand Stand, The Seer, and St rath fil lan leave for Riccarton on Thursday to fulfil their engagements at tho National meeting. — The four fastest trotting mares that ever produced foals are Lou Dillon 1.581, Alix 2.3J, Nancy Hanks 2.4, and Sunol 2.8}. — Lou Milton, the dam of tho world's champion trotter Lou Dillon, 1.581, died in California last month. Sho was. 2G years old. — Tho National Hurdle candidate Southern Cross, who won tho Jumpers' Plat Handicap at Wellington, doos not incur a penalty at Riccarton.'

— Some lucky ones threw in for a good win over Orb/s Derby success, and early birds got as much as 40's to 1 about their pick. —Of the 42 starters in .the four steeplechases run at the V.K.C. Grand National meeting 19 fell or failed to get the full course.

—We often hear of "good things" at racing, but after all there is only oue certainty in connection with the turf. This is its uncertainly, —Tho motion to debar the issue of dual trainers' and jockeys' licenses to the same person vps lost when brought up at the conference.

— A Chrislchurch Press Association message states that To Aroha and havo been scratched for all engagements at til© Grand National meeting. — The Derby winner Orby has never been ruggod except in the depth of winter, and the top door of his box always remains open summer and winter.

—Stayboy, who. got amongst the winners at Wellington, is a half-brother to Muscatel and Sultana, both of whom have been good winners over country. —Three horses were killed, during the V.R.C. Grand National. meeting—Bisley on' the first day, Roma on Wednesday, and Australian on the last day. —If the form of some of the horses seen out at Wellington is truo they will have to improve a good deal before they can have a winning chancc at Riccarton. — The New Zealander Lionheart was put under tho hammer at the conclusion of the T.R.C. National meeting with a 400-guinea reserve, and was passed at 300gs. — Maniopoto is reported to be doing good useful work in the North Island, and at latest accounts was to be worked at Wangajiui during the next month or two. —Mr It. H. Helming has decided to sell off all hift racehorses in training at Nowmarket, England, and his trainer, A. Ferguson, intends to return to Melbourne. — Good progress lias been made with the widening of the Tn-Turna Park' track, and when 'completed the improremeit will no doubt be much appreciated by owners aad trainers.

— The Trotting Conference delegates threw out the proposal that all trotting clubs tehoiild provide one race per day for trotters only. _ Evidently they are a J)it hobbled in their ideas.

—Of the 359 jockeys who were licensed last year no less than 67 did not ride in a race; 44 roda in one race, 27 rode in two races, and 21 in three races, whilst it is believdd thait somo jockeys rode without licenses. —The proposal to license owners of racehorses was not made into law at the Kacing Conference, aud the ousting of the motion would cause more pleasure than sorrow amongst the majority of horse-owners. —It was tho intention some little time back to send Bellis to England to race, but according to. present arrangements he will couipcU in the Caultield Grand National Steeplechase, and will afterwards go up for sale.

— Orby's win in the Derby has placed his sire, Ormo, at the head of the list of English winning stallions, with £11,252 to his credit; next come Gallinule (£7589), Desmond (£612'2), Isinglass (£5050), and Love Wisely (fflcsu). . — The yearling colt, brother to Orloff, by Stepniak from Sortie, which was one of the numerous team taken to Victoria a few weeks ago by D. Price, has been sold, and has gono into E. A. Connolly's stable at Mordialloc.

— After hcine pasted out of the ring at the' Allendale Stock Farm's sale, the New Zea-land-bred horse Dan Patch was sold at 400gs to a. New South Wales buyer. Dan Patch is a son of New Zealand's great sire of speed, Rothschild, and Ruahine, a grand-daughter of Berlin.

— Although the train -which conveyed -the Derby winner Orby back to Dublin did not reach the station until an early hour in the morning, there was an immense gathering and a couple of brass bands awaiting his arrival, and a most enthusiastic scene was witnessed.

— In England a magistrate has ruled that if a bookmaker stands his ground p.flor a race and promises to pay when' able, being without the means to pay on the spot, he is not ipso facto, as it used to be supposed he was, a welsher. — Some of tho English scribes contend that Woolwinder should have won the Derby. Ho got blocked, and lost a lot of ground during the race, but still was troublesome at the finish. Otto Madden is said to have ridden a bad race on the colt.

— Useful work is being done each .galloping morning at Handwick by Proportion, Collarit, Proceed, Lest We Forget. Maori Girl, Pos. 'polite, Noreeri, Comely, Melodrama, Lord Fitzroy, Hapsburg. Soot Free, Tartan, Barbican, Poseidon, and Blue Book. — The well-known Victorian sportsman; Mr Albert Miller, has decided to give up breeding thoroughbreds, and the whole of his Broadlanda slud will be offered for sale on September 2. It includes 40 mares, 25 yearlings, and 20 two and three year olds. ' —Highball, an eight-year-old gelding who has shown a mile better than 2.10 to waggon, was recently purchased by his present owner at £3500. He has a private reputation which will prove him one of the fastest trotters Been out in America in the coming year. — The French Grand National Steeplechase, worth £5858 to the winner, was won by the four-year-old mare Grosse Mere, who carried 9.12, and got over the four miles and a-half in 7min -18&ec. The. conditions were weight for age, and the highest weight carried was 11.6.

— The operations of the various trotting olubs in New Zealand during the past year, as a whole, show an increase of 3500sovs in prize money, and of £51,000 in totalisator revenue. Tbe trotting clubs entitled to use the totalieator put £280,038 through thoir machines during the year, and gave away £29,023 in stakes.

— The imported two-year-oild colt Lord Howard, by St. Serf from a mate by Galopin from Lady Superior, by Sterling from a sister to Hermit, has left quarantine and fone into I. Eamshaw'a stable to be trained, formes (by Gallinule), who was a fellowvoyager with Lord Howard, is also to be trained by Earnshaw. — Tho motion for payment of jockeys' fees at Bcale was carried at the conference, and in future no jockey shall weigh out for any race unless the amount of his minimum fee as for a losiu s mount has been previously deposited with the club. If the jockey wins the balance of the riding fee will be deducted.from the stakes payable to the owner and paid to tho rider. — Seorotaries of racing clubs will have to be careful in future when receiving nominations and acceptances, as amongst the business transacted at the conference was ail alteration which reads: "No arrears due on account of any horse permitted to start at the meoting at which such arrears were incurred shall be placcd in the unpaid forleit list."

— Hadyli is amongst the acceptors for the National Steeples, but a Wellington paper states that the Sou'-wester gelding will not be a starter in tho race. Haydn won 535sovs in slakes at Wellington, and by doing so incurred a 141b penalty for the National Steeples. This brings his weight up to 12.3.

— A report from Melbourne states thai a boring contest has taken place at Philadelphia between Johnson, the coloured heavyweight, and Fitzsimmons, formerly champion of tho world. The match was of short duration, Johnson complotaly outclassing Fitisimmons, and knocking him .out in the second round.

— The three-year-old colt Montagu, who scored easily in the Lawn Handicap, six furlongs, on the last day of the V.lt.C. National meeting, is a half-brother by Bejivolio to Malfearn, a very promising filly which Sir J. R. Mackenzie imported from Australia, but which was unfortunately put on to the rails and killed whilst racing in the North Island.

— About 200 years have been spent, says the Kew York Spirit of tho Times, teaching tho English thoroughbred to run, to run. remember, and no>v wc insist- he shall come to a barrier and stand still. It is the one umutural, irrational, ridiculous blot on our flat lacing. By-and-bye we will niako them come to a dead standstill within 10 yards of the judges.

— The weak points of a _ horse can be better discovered while standing than while moving. II he is sound, he will stand firmly and gracefully on his limbs without moving them—with legs plump and naturally poised. A fine, spirited liorse may have a bungling gait or lack of endurance from bad foot, which will hurt his value very materially, and too often it is all the owner's fault. — Prpi and St. Kooringa were again schooled ill company at "Winjatui 011 Saturday morning, and it was evident by the stylo in which they shaped that their previous bout had sharpened the pair up. Tlicy put a bit more dash into their work, and alter jumping in capital style came along fast over the last four fences. The pair are hooked to lotivo for Riccaiton on Friday.

— Cross Batter}', who "was one ot the ruling favourites for .the Winter Cup, for which she was backed down to 10's to 1. is amongst the missing after the declaration of the first payment for the race. It is rumoured that the daughter of Stepniak has been giving her trainer soino trouble, and consequently is liks)y i<t wiita tlit tup to iustoli#.

— Lameness in horses is far more prevalent than among any other species of animals, and this is dye to a. highly-organised and complicated internal structure'being encased in ail unyielding horny box. In keep, ine this external portion of the hoof in a natural and healthy condition, the internal sensitive tissues are thereby more securely protected from injury, and this is the main secret of having a sound-going horse. — UJie gentlemen appointed to fill the positions of stipendiary stewards to the West Australian racing clubs are Ht H. Roulston, -who was the turf editor of the Sydney Referee, and wrote under the pen-name of "Umpire"; Mr F. Morris, v/lio lias been acting as a stipendiary steward at the pony meetings in Sydney; and Mr A. ll'Dougall, of Melbourne. Each of the stewards are to receive £700 a year. —In a private letter written'a few years ago the King declared that he had a horror of gambling, which, in his opinion, like intemperance, was one of the greatest curses that the country could be afflicted with; and he went on to add: "Hcrse-racing may produce gambling, or it may not, but I Iw-ve always looked upon it as a manly sport, which is popular with Englishmen of all classes, and there is no reason why it should bo looked upon as a gambling transaction. A!as! thgse who gamble will gamble at anything." ■' — Sir lan Hamilton describes the test to which the Chinese farmer in Manchuria subjects a mule offeree! for sale:—Ropes are fastened to the mule's collar, and six strong coolies hang on to these like Tim death. The animal is then whipped up, and if it oan overcome the resistance of the coolies it is bought; if not, it is rejected. Sometimes the coolies lose their footing and are dragged through the mud a.nd trampled on by the mules, greatly to the amusement of the women standing in the doorways, who simply shriek with laughter at the fun.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

SPOUTING AND SPORTS., Otago Daily Times, Issue 13970, 1 August 1907

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3,570

SPOUTING AND SPORTS. Otago Daily Times, Issue 13970, 1 August 1907

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