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SPOTTING AND SPORTS.

• THE; TUBE.

, By 1 : Skntiml. • - ,

.RACING CALENDAR, : ■ • 1905. iV"- . , May 3 and 4—Marlborough IfcC. Autumn. . May 3 and. 4—Hawke's Bay J.C, Autumu, May 6—Ch'ristchurch B.C. Autumn; : : May 10—Tahuna Park meeting. '.'.'"v.May 10 and 11—Egmont B.C. winter. May' 11 and 12—Ashburtou ■ County B.C. Autumn. May 20—Forbury Park Winter. May 20 and 24—Xakapuna J.C. Winter. ■ May 24 and 25—WangamiiJ.C..Winter, May 24 and 25—North Otago. J.C. Winter. June 2 and 3—Dunedin J.C.-'Wintel'. ' June 3 and s—Otaki Maori B.C. Winter. Juno 3, 7, and 10—Auckland B.C. Great Northern Steeplechase. June 21 and'22—Hawke's Bay J.C. Winter. June 23 'and Pirlt B.C. Winter. July B and 7—Gisborne B.C.' Winter, July 11 and 14—Wellington B.C. Winter. '

"Thero lias recently been a good deal of discussion in sporting circles as to ( tlle merits of Machino Gun and Achilles . 'yor a short coursc, and the ivritor has learned, on fairly good authority, that a ehnik-iigo ,wii3 issued against Achillea ly tlio Ynldhurst party . to .. match' .Machine Gun against the Porirua crack, over a five-fur-long ooiirso, 9.0 up/ for anything from £500 to £5000. Machino Gun is now at his very best, and after coming back from Mana-«-atu come oh. in- his work, and what was of considerably more importance,, from what can be learned, His respiratory organs appeared to got into better working order than usual. Achilles, on. the other hand, although in good order—as evidenced by his win in the Challengo Stakes—does not begin so smartly as usual from the barrier Bihco he went amiss in the spring! and it is understood that it was this reason which caused tho Porirua party to decline tho challenge. It will always bo a debatable point as to which of the two is the better over a short course, a.nd it is .regrettable that Achilles .did not.. figure amongst the starters for the Great. Easter, from .which he was probably withdrawn owing to the penalty .conditions attached to the rate. With his penalty, Achillas 'Would have had lo carry 10.9, and as Machino Gun also incurred a 101b penalty the pair would have met under tho same conditions as in t.lio original handicap, with tho difference of having to cany a. hisJic-r scale of weight, which would probably. , havo boon in tho Ynldhurst horse's favour, as there's no gainsaying he has proved himself a. great weight-carrier. There is' an idea to ijo obtained from tho Easter and Challenge form ao to how the pair would have shaped had they met on Kasfar Monday. In the Easter, Machino Gun won, all out, under 10.4, in tho official'time of lniiu 29 Msec; biit tlioro n.ro excellent reasons for believing that the correct time was under 29; whilst Achilles ran over <lhc samo course, with 9.6, in lmin 28 4-ssec, and accomplished his task comfortably and in 'such a manner that even with the extra poundage ho would have had to carry the son of Medallion would havo given Machino Pure something to do in beating him. ■

In the Electric Handicap (four furlongs), run in November, Machino Gun downed Achillcsj but the latter, although a bit off colour, was able to pace it with the Hotclikiss horss over throe and a-half furlongs. Since then tho form displayed by them is quite recent, but thero is no doubt that Machino Gun has improved all round: still. whilst Achillea has lost a hit of his brilliancy • off tho mark, no doubt that would eomo back to him; and, fit and well, the -.writer is one that would give his veto foi' Achilles under the conditions alluded to above, whilst it would be a shado of odds on him over six furlongs. The faces of some of cur old-time sportsmen wore a regretful expression as they noticed .the flags at Riccarton flying, halfmast high last week out of respect for Mr Robert Reay. or ns lie was more nopulnrly known, "Old Bob Ray," who from tho infancy of the New Zealand turf down to tho early eighties was one of the best-known figures on our racecourse?, and many of our race-goers have a vivid recollection of tho French grey, ceriso bolt and cap which Reay wore when ho steered Torn- :■ ploton and others to victory. Reay was , identified with efimo rf tho best horses' which were raced in Now Zealand and Aus- | tralin in the early days, and his horsemanship was of a particularly high standard, whilst ho was a thorougn master of the art of preparing horses for ■ their races. Tho first hbri2<3 of 'note his name was coupled with were Strop, Potentate, Miss Rowo, and Jo. Strop wns eonsiiterod one of the garaest and best horses ever foaled in New Zealand, and dropped dead after running' fourth 'in one of the Champion .rases won by Zoo. Ono of his first winning mounts of note wa* on Ada, on whom' lie won the P.wt Canterbury Derby, run in 1860, and which raco ho subsequently won on fivo othor occasions. Reay won tho Christchurch Plato in 1370 on Knotting];, - and the raco is now known us-the-New Zealand Cup. In 1P63 and 1f64 Roay won the Canterbury Cup on Revoke and (Iclden Clo'iid respectively, and also steered Knottingly and Tomplcton to victory in tho samel rncc. When Ladybird won tho Champion Raco at Ohristcliurcli Reay was her pilot, besides winning, many other important races both in this colony and ■« Australia. At tho first meeting hold at tho Silvcrstrcam Reay won tho Provincial ,Cup on Kauri Gum, and tho outcome of this victory was that a match was arranged between tho winner and Falcon for 600aiiv.i a-sido over thr«> miles. Kauri Gum, who was trained and ridden, in the match by Reay, won after a groat race by a short length. 110 gave '650gs for Teniplolon, and won tho Duncdin Cup, Canterbury Cup, tyid other races willi tho son of Traducer, and had a sham in Mata whcb.tlu famous Dead Shot, gelding ran in tho Melbourne* Cup. ■ Other well-known cracks !:<; was identified with were Luriiuo, Calumny, Hatred, Malice, Envy, Daniel O'Rourko, (!rii>, Natator,.. Oudeis, .Cheviot, Vanguard, Maritana, Hornby, Welcome Jack, and many others. He last rode in 1884, when he bade adieu to tho saddlo after steering Cheviot to victory in the C..T.C. Midsummer .Handicap and Craven Stakes. Mr Reay had been more or less of. an invalid for a number of years past, and it is some considerable time since ho was seen on a racerenrso. It was generally understood that severe wasting during the early part cf his. career had a great deal to do with Reay's iiclieato state of health in recent years Tho Forbury Park Racing Club has issued ah attractive programme for its winter mooting, which is set down to tako placo on Saturday, May 20.- The principal item on tho card is the St. Kilda Handicap, of 40sovs, ono mile, Tlinrc is a 35sov prize attached to'tho Mu.scl burgh Handicap, fivo, furlongs, a 30. ; 0v Welte-i* to ho run ovoV ■ft six-furlong course, a Trial Handicap of 2osovs, fivo furlongs, onon to horses that have not won a raco exceeding 40sovs in value at tirno of starting, , and a Hack Handicap of 25sovs, six furlongs, completes the-galloping events on the card. A milo trot of 30sovs and a 35«0v .milo and a-lialf trot also find a place on tho programme, nominations for which close on l'ridav next, May 5. - — The death is reported of tho St. Leger— Hazel stallion St. Cyr, — Needlework is reported to be shaping well in his schooling over hurdles.. — Savoury was passed in at 250gs'. when placed under the hammer last .week, — Roller broke down whilst running in the second day's hurdles at Riccarton." — Acceptances for..the Taliuna Pnrk Trotting Clnb[s meoting close on Saturday nest. — Machino .Gun was -discovered to be a roarer .the first time he was asked to gallop. — Stronghold, lias been shipped north to fulfil his engagements at. tho Hawlte's Bay meeting. ■ ■' — Mi=s Gladys, .the dam of Gladsome, slipped her foal a'few flays ago for the second yearin succession. — According to reports 'Mr G. G. Stead's colt Delaware gave a poor display in his raco at Auckland. — Nomenclature item: Amongst the starters at the C.J.C. meeting was Ariadne, a daughter of Caslashorc, — Apollodoris stands about 14.3, and it he dees not grow upwards he would make a moro than useful pony. ... — "AVhnt Ailsa?" murmured a punter when he hot iced the daughter of YPallaeo getting licked in the Easter. — Signalman put up a couple of good performances in his Epsom' and second to Ailsa ill tho Teinpleton. —It has been decided that the, V.R.C. Derby wil bo run on December 4, and the-Melbourne Cup on November 7. ■-..'' :

' —Euclid, a lialf-brotliee to Solution,'-shaped promisingly in tho Bussley Plate, ahd was .travelling welt at the finish'. 7. < — A complimentary ticket for the'Westland Itacing Club's autumn' meeting is to' hand, and. acknowledged with thsnkV — Tho late B. Beay rodethe first winner of .the Canterbury Derby, and subsequently rodo. 'five other winners of the same race. — The Russians will no doubt Rain fresh ardour in their efforts against the Japs wltoil, they hear of the victories. of Vladimir and Alexis oil-the Biccoiton batt-lefiold. — The English horseman W. Bainbridge'had a mount 1 at Feilding, and created a favourable impression amongst the spectators. — Tho Weatiand Baeing Club last week disqualified the erosß-c.ountry. horseman Delaney for 12 months for suspicious riding. / — Machine Gun's official time for. the Groat Easier was lmin 20 >l-ssec, but several private watchholders made it lmin 28 2-sscc. —If not ambitiously placed, Alexis should not prove ft dear horse at the 105gs which ha realised under the hammer last week. — Tho colt by Ho'.clikiss—Fornio, a fu'lbrother to Multiform, broke 0110 of his legs tho other day and had to be destroyed. — Vladimir cost his present owners somewhere in the neighbourhood of £550, and has proved u very cheap horse at tho price; — Tile Ciiirassow—Poiilsettia gelding-Culro-Bettin has been leaac'd by J, Kuttifdge, and has joined the litter's stable at Wingatui. — The C<lstashore—Poiilsettia gelding Citira-, Ecttia, owned by Mr S. J, Price, lias been leased to a patron of J. Buttledge's stable. — Cavatina was ilridiug along vory strongly in the early part of the Epsom Welter, bub collapsed after' going about five - furlongs. — Tirolo won both his races- at lliccarton with a good bit in hand, and his form went to show that his Timaru win was.no fluke. — Exmoor, Savoury, 1 and Gold' Crown have been scratched for all engagements at the Hawke's Bay Jockey Club's autumn meeting. — Munjeet was allotted 10.7 in the Autumn Nursery, five furlongs, and was asked to concede, ,71b to Glenowlet, who finished fourth. ■ — Tartan, the winner of the Sydney Cup, is a half-brother, by Loehiol, to tho well-known performers Australian Star and Australian Colours. — The Gipsy Grand—Mai-lin mare GipsyLynn fell in a race on the second day of tho Riverion meeting, and had to be destroyed. — It is stated that the crack high-jumper A Fours, who cleared Oft llin at the Maitland show, was sold on Bogamildi Station as a foal for 30s. • — The two-year-old Sal Tasker won the. Juvenile Stakes for the last day of the New Zealand Metropolitan trots from a flying start in 2.20. — Ylndimir.nml Convoy cannoned into each other nt the star! of the Great Autumn, and tho former wns a trifle sore the following day as a result of the buiup. — Alter Tupara won the Hurdle Eace on the second day of tho C.J.C. meeting his legguards had to be pipt in the" sca.!e before lus rider could draw weight. —A half-brother by Grafton to Lord Cardigan and Dividend was purchased by Mr Cliirnsidc, of Victoria,' tor 1750gs at the Bandwick blood stock, sales last week. —Auruin's stud fee in England has been further rodnced, and is' now only 9gs. l)he fact of not having proved himself a sure foalgotler may be responsible, — Vladimir wns chased • into llie straight bv a Machine ■ Gun on Easter Monday, and he did tho wises! thing possible under the circs.—that is, beat a retreat. . — The price paid for Seahorse by his Ainetjj can buyers was 2000gs, at which figure, in tire light of his English form, the ex-New -Zealander appears to ho well sold. — Although B. Beay must have had a warm spot in his heart for gallant old Teilipleton, he considered Welcome Jack the very best horse with which he was ever associated. — Sungod has not made the improvement one would reasonably expect from his spring form, and showed a lack of brilliancy in both his latest efforts at Biccarton, — Owing to Air H. Brinkman being unable to attend the forthcoming North Otago meeting the handicaps ior the trotting events will be compiled by Mr 11. J. Gourley, jun — It is a long straight that hasn't an occasional winner in it, and the recent success, of Ailsit was considerably overdue, but nolle the less desirable or popular oil that- account. — Convoy was evidently'a bit above himself when he went- to race in the Great Autumn, and his peacocky behaviour lost him one or two admirers for his chance. -- Congratulations to W. M'Donald, who i was married last week to Miss A. Low, of lliccarton. Long life and happiness together, ; with a ton of luck to the young couple. | —Ailsrt* did no,t-'look .well to the eye when going out for her; recent races at -Kiccarton owing to. being troubled with a-skin disease which has affecled a number of horses lately. — The V.H.C. Committee proposes at an early dale to invite representatives of country racing clubs to meet in conference and discuss the subject of. the -curtailment of country racing. . - -

— Tho Guard figures amongst the nominations'for the principal events to be decided at the Auckland National meeting, and also lias been entered m tho AVanganui Steeplechase!

— The totalisator returns for the C.J.C.' autumn meetings held (luring the past few years read:—l9oo, £15,189; .1901, £18,212; WO2, .£18,207;'1903, £22,619; 1904, £23, Gil 15s; 1905, £19,784.

— Owners aro givon a final reminder that nominations bloso on Thursday, May 4, for all events, except the linok Scurry; to be decidcd at the North Otago Jockey Club's winter meeting.

— Mr Stead timed the various stages of tho Great Autumn as follows;— Two furlongs; SGJsec; four furlongs, 52sec; Rix furlongs, linin lßJsec; eight furlongs, Imin 44sec; 12 furlongs, 2iuiu Msec. — Tlio lion. George M'Lcan's stallion Lord liosslvn had a winning representative at Auckland last week, ivherc a (hree-ycar-old geiding named V/aitati beat 15 others in the A.it.C. Criterion Handicap. . — Vladimir put up a good performance in tin! Autumn, as he was last off the' mark owing to cannoning with Convoy, and his actual time must have been it trifle faster than tho official 2.30. — Red Black, who won a coiipic of races at tlio Besnumont meeting, is a half-brother by the Maxim horse Black and Red to the onetime .well-known performer Jupiter, who was a good winner in his day.

— In. Prance the stud services of at least one of flying Fox.'s progeny is obtainable at n low figure. The four-year-old French Fox, who showed excellent form as a two-year-old, is doing dutv at- a fee of 20gs.

' — Gladsome's three-year-old brother Giadp.tolio showed good form at tho A.B.C..meeting,, and registered a good.perfopnancc in comfortably annexing the Autumn Handicap (ono mile ami a-half) in 2min 3G 3-ssec.

— The trotting horse Engineer got away from his trainer after doing exercise at l'ahuna Park or. Thursday, and broko his neck. This is bad luck for the owner, who refused £100 for tho Electioneer gelding two days ago. — A number of mcta'licians got a severe blow to their banking accounts by Sardonx's win at AVr.irarapa. The Saracen horse was popularly supposed to be a rod in pickle, and rewarded those in the know with a £12 5s dividend.

— It is stated that the' West Australian paper which decidcd to exclude all horse-racing news from its columns lias suffered a considerable decreaso in its circulation, and the management has gone in for general retrenchment. . — Hie mucb-talkcd-about Jlaniopoto reported to have pleased the Napier touts in a couple of sprints he was, treated to on Saturday, and his beautiful action and de- 1 termined style of moving won him heaps of admirers. > — Canteen has lost many friends since ho won the New Zealand Cup, and now he has been robbed of his Australasian record by Tartan, who cut out the Sydney .Cup journey in 3ir.in 27sec. and knocked a fraction off the. grey's time. — The A.E.C. has declined to endorse tho disqualification of J. M'Cluskev, imposed by the Avomlalo. iToekev Club, until further inquiries have been made into the matter. Consequently M'Clnskey was allowed to ride at the A.K.C. meeting.

— Messrs ibarnett and Grant have erected. now offices in Christ church, and are now ill the happy position of being able to collect rent from themselves, together with that from other tenants occupying suites of offices in the smne building. — Machine Grim will probably be taken to Australia, where bis dam Kubina hailed from, and where his half-sister Florrie and halfbrother Launceston carried silk when taken across by Mr D, O'Brien. -Kubina, by the way, died in 1901. — The High Jump al the Sydney shoiv, held last week, was won by Mr Moloney's 13hd» pony Kaylnate, who cleared 6ft> 4in, beating horses which have ivou pvizes- m all parts.oJ Australia. This reads a marvellous perform-., unco for such a liliputian. — t'lio Melbourne Cup winner, Cleaii Swtep, ran in a, £50 Maiden Hurdle llacc at Cheltenham (Eng.) last month, and finished a long last iu- a field' of. 10. . He had » fcuru at the stud, but. his return to the turf suggests that bis services are not in diimand.

. — After seeing Pfiltovna under big weights leaking great haste orer the early put o! some of her races and fading aWnj at the business end of tlie trip, it would perhaps lie advisablo to steady-her -'a bit at tlio. outset, and see if she could act better at.tha finish.

— An offer of ilDOgs was recently refused for the North Island hack Sit,Geraint,.who tost £2gs at the I'ahnerslbh sales last year, and wr.s' subsequently resold.;fov ; 30g8, , because bin' ottner had 110. 100 m for him in a truck of horses which ho had purchased at the sale. — Daliiy, the sister to 6r!ofi, is evidently doming on, as she held her own in five-furlong gallops with Boomerang on Saturday at Napier. :It is,said that fialny was as smart as either Boomerang or King Billy in the early part of tho season,' but went amiss.' - . ' ■

• —At the recent meeting of the FeildingJockey Club the, piun of £29,767 was put' through the totalisatot during the two days, which is £277S more than was handled at Uie A.R.C. meeting (three ,dAvs), and no less than £0933 moroilhau at the Canterbury J.C. meeting, (two days). -- Sttpniak received additional honours to his m<»rit as a stallion during tho past few days by tlio wins of Vladimir, Kremlin; Roso Madder, and Munjcet, landing over 1300soVs in plir.e money. In addition, some of his stock won at some of the.minor meetings held during the recent holidays.' — A Duiiedin s.p. merchant who dropped £GOO over the hurdle races' at Feildiug has cut off tho No reply" .permit ill connection with the illegitimate game ill the North Island, simply because it was t. case of " pay, pay, pay " with suspicious regularity ill connection with ilirsc events.

—Mr A. Moss was struck heavily over the hurdle events on the Feilding programme, and owing to the extremely remarkable luck displayed by some of his clients' does not intend to operate so fully as heretofore on the illegitimate gamos an seen at some of our North -Island meetings. . — Norice. put up a go.of 2.18 4-5 in the Fliers' Handicap, but waß unqualified along with Very:; for galloping. It appears both horses-left their feet in tho last couple of strides, aiid, according to press reportSj tho action of the club in distancing the winner did not meet with the approval of the public. — frladsome's latest success, which was ac'quired at Kandwick, is the twenty-third victory standing to the credit of the New Zealandbred marc, .and her stake winnings now amount to £7702, a little mora.than half of which has been won in the colours of her present owner. Mr Sol Green. ■ — Up-to-date (the cable informs us) did a fins performance in the A.J.C.. Steeplechase,' holding a good position all the way, and jumping faultlessly. lie took charge after passing llle half-mile post, and led Kaffir, Young Crcswick, and Skyward info the straight. He then drew away, and won in a- canter by two iengths. — Notwithstanding the V.R.C. had adopted the disqualification imposed by the Calcutta Turf Club, Mr Barney Allen put in an appearp.nce at Fleniington 011 Saturday. Ho was requested to lcavo, hut 011 deolining to do so was escorted to the gate by the club's detective. A'.lon has announced .that he intends taking the matter to the law oourls.

— Machine Gun was allotted 11.5 iu tlie Templetoii Handicap, and Vladimir camo next on the list with 9.10, whilst the weightadjuster allowed himself a range of no less than GBlb to bring Ilia field together. Willi all his weight Machine Gun would have had something to say ill tho race if his owner had elected to send him to the post.

— The New Zealand Trotting Association has published the' official list of horses registered ill New Zealand from August 1, 1903. lo July 31, 1904, and also alterations and additions to previous list of horses registered from 1893 to 1903. This is a most important piece of work, and all clubs and owners should be in possession of the lists, which are published at 2s. — Referring to tlio reappearance of Sloan early last month, the New York Journal says: ".T. Milliliter Sloan is not only sincere in his efforts to regain his prestige as a jockey, but ho aIEO retains much of tho skill which made him tho star rider of a few years ago." This eulogy was brought forth by tho fact that Sloan had four mounts in one day,. and landed two winners.

— King of Iron, said by tho Northern Miner io lie about 16 years old, won the Flying and Coriudn. Handicaps at tho recent Corinda (Q.) laces. Says the Miner: "Mr \V, Hartley, who was looking on, remarked that Ring of Iron beat his horse Magistrate at Mount Success in 1595, just 10 years ago. The old chap looked ragged, Wt Jacobs had liim in great condition, and rode him with judgment." — Since the O.J.C. Champagne Stakes was inaugurated in 1871 Mr Stead's name figures on the list of winners 14 times—a remarkably creditable record. His first win was ill 1884, when Trenton was'successful. Other Yaldhurst victors wero llaxim, Medallion, Strowan, Blue Fire. Mannlicher, Bombshell, Multiform, Altair, Screw ! Gun, Formosaiij Cruciform, Orloff, and now Munjeet." — That this year's A.R.C, Easter Handicap was regarded as ono of the most open races ' that lias over coino up for decision at Ellerf'io was well exemplified by the prices offered oy the luetallicians. When the inile race (says an Auckland exchange) came to bo attacked onthe day odds of 8 to 1 were pretty well everfi' where obtainable, and at the close of operation!! that prico was still being quoted on the field. '■ — A private match over a mile was rmi off on the Tinwald racecourse last week between Mr J. Smith's Prohibition and Mr R. Burnett's Bouncing Bob, the former being ridden by Smith and the latter by L. ft/King. Bouncing Bob went to the front after the first fur-' long: and won easily. The mile was covered' in lmin 50sec. Tho match was for a wager of .£2O aside."" Mr T. E. "Upton acted as starter and Mr MT Stilt as judge. — As in many other towns in England, street betting is strongly suppressed in AVcst Hartlepool, but in that city the bookmakers have a cuto way of circumventing the authorities. From 1 o'clock until well on in the afternoon the "hookies" stand on the stretcli of sand on tho seashore, and on positions below liighwater mark As this is not a place within tho meaning of the act,-the local authorities aro. quite powerless in interfere. — Convey would have probably given a better account of himself in the Autumn Handicap if lie had had a race m the Easter. !Qle looked and acted as if he was a hit above himself when lie'went out to race ,in the Autumn. After gelling badly away ho raced through tho rack as the field turned into the back stretch, and five furlongs from homo lie wan up with the leaders, and appeared to be pulling M'Comb out of tho saddle, bilt ho collapsed beforo reaching llielioiho torn. — Savohry's displays under- silk last week were disappointing. In tho Easter he was in the ruck throughout, .and finished' ■second lasT. There was some exciiße to bo made for him in tho tact that, according .to Dame Rumour, the colt was specially trained for the Autumn, for which lie finished fifth after never appearing to be dangerous at any stage of the journey. Judged by last week's form, the prack flyer of the spring can now neither go fast nor stay.

— A yearling colt with which the writer wa9 particularly struck when paying a'visit to Mr G. Ct. Stead's Grasslea stud in November last -was a handsome upstanding chestnut- by Multiform out of the imported Orvicto marc Strosaa. Unfortunately tho colt has injured himself across tho back, nrnl it is more than likely thai lie will have to he shot. This is a, piece of bad luck for his owner, who valued tho youngster vet)' highly, aiid is. understood to have said that 2000gfl would ! not liavo made him part with the colt.. — In a rccent issue of the Racing Calendar the skwards of tho English Jockey Club givo untico to owners, trainers, and jockeys that the following instructions have been given to starters:—Tho start- is to bo mad* from a " stand," and jockeys (especially the seniors) who wilfully prevent tlnjir horses [rnm standing still should invariably bo reported. Unruly horses must suitor for their bad behaviour, and if they cause prolonged delay, they , should either' be started "at a stand" behind the rest.of the horses, lie "'eft." —"'J.-M'Comb was kopt fairly lrasy at tho . C.J.C. meeting, and had 13 rides out »of % possible 14; He rode 7.5 on the second day, and his record was: Three vfins, two seconds, and a- third. One of the host races lie redo was when, on pnehton. lie was defeated a head by Derrelt on Hoyal Crown. M'Comb waited patiently on'his mount, who is. not the most courageous animal in the world, but when he made his final call the Lochiel colt did not respond or lengthen his stride an inch, despite a couple of rib crackers which were given in the last couple oi strides. --Messrs "Darnell and Grant's, A. Moss's, and, "J. Loughlin!s double books over the Easter and Autumn proved to .bo good volumes for those metallicinns. One of those who picked tho combination for, half ft century agaijst Mr Loughlin was a gentleman from whom tho latter had just purchased the house and stables formerly occupied by Mr S. Mercer at tho Forlniry. The vendor of the property a-sked the' inotallician what he fancied for :tho double, and by-way of giving him a turn planked a sovereign on tho selection which netted the sum mentioned above.

. FOOTBALL.'

' 1 Bx Pull Back. The latest addition' to tho New Zealand team, for .Great;: Britain"is tho Otago -front-ranker, -Stephen Casey. -His going is, liko that of othoraj subject to medical test and continued forni. . Trifling Injuries. Playor (feebly): "Did, we win'/" Sympathising Comrade: "We did,, old fellow.";- Football Player (excitedly): . "A'over . mind that dislocated thigh, doctor. Take these broken teeth out of mj' mouth so that I can holler." • An instance of-liiiusnal scoring is reported to liavo taken place ili a match in Knglarid recently.' - M - tho ways possible of scorine were followed-a goal from a try, a dropped goal,, a goal from a mark, a penalty goal,, and a.try. . . ' . ; .'lt may interestfootballers and football iogi?'lators.-t6 knov that.'at a special meeting of the International Board of Rugby football in .Lriglandj- it-wasidecided'to' alter the'

modo ofiseoting by riJuoin? tho value of , the mark goal from four -points to three, and ■ abolishing the field goal. ' , Quite, a number of intelligent persons at.'., tho Oalcdbiiian 'Grollnd On Saturday bOcanio perturbed over 'tho' question of replacing an 1 injured player oocaeioncd by.-Hobson, tlip' captain of Alhambra,' having to Icavo tlio field owing -to an injury. Whatever. Mr - Williams's own pbrsoniil feelings were in ; iho matter, he had 110 option but to enforce 1 the. deeisjon arrived at by tlio Rugby Union last yoar that an injured playor . could not W replaced. Tho fact that •ho was not' quite certain of tho .position had no bearing on tho question, for whoii assured that, ail injured plnyei" could not be replaced lie did .they proper thing by refusing to' allow Another man to go'ofl. The question is of great Hhd _ I atai pleased. that Mr ,lley has moved ill tlio direction of hayiiig tho 'rnption rescinded, if for, no other reason than that tlio matter will again como up for discussion. There aro a number of sensible Seasons why an injured player should not be replaced, and quito as great a number equally sensible why ho should. No doubt tho 0.K.F.U., at tho next meeting," will reason the Question out. intelligently, and settle tho matter ono way , • or . tho other. It.'has been contended that tho English Union is not quite eortain on the question; yet it is a fact that in all matches played under the jurisdiction of the English Rugby Union in England an-;,' injured player cannot bo replaced. The forogoing is not put' forth as an argument why we should do so here, for it may bo that)what has .been looked upon as ari English Kiiuby Union ruling is , only a practice! What has become custom in .. England need not necessarily bo followed -' ' in the colonics.

George W. Smith, ' "the greyhound" of tho '97 New Zealand team which toured Australia, and who shortly a (forwards 'retired from ' the' game (says an Auckland , writer), took part, in the practico on a. recent Saturday. Hedid fomo useful sprinting and kicking, while his handling and fielding of the ball showed that, despite v his long absence from tlio game, ho still, retains much of hi? old ability. Although, in very good form for the beginning of tho . season, lie showed .signs of fatigue long before the game was; over, which was only, to bo expected. It. is no secret that George is donning tKe* jorsov this season in view of the visit of a Now Zealand team to England. Acknowledged with thanks from tho editor (Mr W. Garrard) copy, of tho Canterbury Rugby Union's Annual for 3 905. First, in the field, this compact publication, full as it is of.slatistical matter, is "Bovril' to the footballer. . W. T. Ritchie, Of Duftodin and Cambridge University, was picked at. the lass moment as olio of tho Scottish thrce-nuar-ters for the match against England at Richmond recently, and played a very sound game. It is probable, that another New Zealandcr would have beeav in the Scottish team—Stewart, of AVancanui and Edinburgh University—had.not this young player met with a severe accident on tlio football field some few weeks ago, after showing brilliant form throughout the season. Th« injury sustained by P. C. Htilme, the English International half had;, in a club game, was worse than at first anticipated. but there is every ohanco that ho will lie thoroughly sound. within the next few days. . Special' treatment ifl pulling him ■round nioely. " ' ■ Tho. Kaikorai-Union match served to attract a largo attendance to tlio North Ground on Saturday, but the game was brilliant in patches only, and was for tho - most nart n rather uninteresting exhibition. Probably this may lie accounted for by tho fact that the loam? have not shaken down to tho season's business of Rugby football. Whatever tho cause, there was certainly a lack, of combination 'on both side. Individually sorno of the men played well, but tlio.ro was nothing of the "well-oiled ma- ( chinery" about the toams as a whole. Moro training—sprinting, .not long-distance running. and os much outdoor work, as'possible | —will lick tho men into shape and get tho 1 team going together. . ■ Speaking of individual play. Kaikorai'* weakness lies behind the .pack. The half back is not sufficiently clever for tho position and does not get the ball away tinartlv enough. A three-quarter lino like that claimed by Kaikorai may. play themselves sick for all the- gqpd they will do without, tho ball. - It.should be dinned.into tho half hack—not the Kaikorai eomm man in particular, but all the half backs—that tho hall-alone is wanted, and in. every case it should lie marked "urgent." Of the Kaikorai three-quarter lino Booth was probably tho brst. Apart from tho ■ brilliant run from .halfway to over tho Union lino, tho feature of his play :was his tackling, - which was of tlio deadly . order. Hard and.low Booth went at his . , man, bringing him down . wit-lv certainty. Quite a .number, .of intelligent perpons hold tlio opinion, li6sml .'oil last year's form,.that. Booth is lucky to- Iks selected in the New': Zealand team for . England. Tlio Kaikorai back has only to play a, few more games like last Saturday to convince the scoptics that he is entitled to selection. Since last season Booth has improved greatly, and as he is in Excellent condition and playing to keep his plaie in' the New Zealand team, we may look for something extra special from i im every time'ho puts on n jersey.

,Armit did not pet much of tho ball on t.lio wins of the three-quarter line—certainly not as much as this sneedy player should, — but when the ball did find a resting-ptaco in-the arms of the Kaikorai throe-quarter that worthy made several Iwld dashes with it. to\v«]ds - the enemy's goal. Armit is a player who should he' fed all clay, for, possessing plenty of pace and dash, he is always a most lilcoly man to score.

1 Dobsnti played fiyo-cighth on Saturday, - and albeit a good enough man in that position I adhere to the belief that, ho is out o f his pluee and should ba in tho three-quarter line. Possib.y it was tlin slow lob passes received from his half back whioh prevented him showing to tho best adv.mtaie in' the position. " Given a quick, resourceful man behind the scrum, Dobson would mako a deal of play for the three-quarter iine Duncan. is still in a class by himself as a lire-eighth, and on Saturday showed that not only docs ho know the game, lwgimiing, end, and middle, but what, is more to tho point, is; still able to play it. As his team waß for the most, part on .tho attack Strang, tho Eaikorai full baeV. did not. have a great deal to do, Ho' fielded the ball with certainty, and played to the. touch-line with his kicks. It was noticed that Straus frequently followed up his owii kick, leaving his goal unprotected. This stylo of play is not. to lx>-cncouragcd, for in the event of tho ball being rntjirnod smartly a bifr gap in tho defcncc is, left.' It should nlweys be the practice of one of the threequarters to drop back when tho full back is following up his own kick. While they shone in tho loose, I noticed, that one ov two of tho Kaikorai forwards did not appear too fond of scrum toil. There were others, however; who wero doing their share in the hurly-burly and in tho dribbling work. M'Bonald, Adamson, Omnnd; and Thomson were conspicuous for goal play throughout. The former whs the best all-round forward on his side.

Tiio appcaranco oE .Tames Duncan, oneRCiisnn retired footballer anil hero of a hundred Kugby battles, clad in the blnck-atid-bluo hooped jersey of the Kaikorai Club. wa3 the signal for cheering-by tho multitudo on the North Ground on Saturday. Tho "Old Man" turned out in placo of Don, the Dune-din back, who has not yet been granted a' transfer from his old club to tlwt of Kulkoroi, which lie desires to join. In Coombcr, the Union full back, do I recognise a player from .Milton who was onco pickcd for;a Irial match in Dunedin a rouple or three seasons ago? ... Placing against Kaikorai on Saturday Coomber shoived, that he lias some knowledge of tho game, but as a full back ho does not quito come up to, the standard. He gets to tho ball quickly, itnd invariably fnula the touch-line, but there is 110 power behind. and his kicks pain little ground for his side. Coomber did not cut a very good figuro on defence—Booth beat him badly on ■ 0110 occasion—but be may reasonably b* cxpeeted to improve, as tho ceason goes 'Oil.

Tho Union three-quarters, young , and somewhat inexperienced -aa they, are, shaped fairly weiroll tho whole.. Reid, who kicked, the Association ball last year, •wis tho pick of the three-quarter liiie. This .player has all the qualifications. for a three-quarter back, and when ho gains experience should develop into a useful

man in that position. Littlejolm played sell until meeting with ail injury to his thigh,. which handicapped Mm somewhat ,'or later efforts. Bennett appeared to bo nervous and anxious to get rid of the ball. Ho might have uindo a great deal more list; of his pace, of which ho possesses t fair-share. IJcnnctt has played many better games. Directly behind and closo up. to the Bi-ruinmage tliero is a weakness which niu.it bo remedied if the Union hope to win many matches this season. I refer particilnrly to tho half back, who has not quite grasped his position—tho most imWjrtant oil :,lic field when a back game is ' being played. It docs not matter how elever your front-rankers aro in hooking the. ball if your half back does not get it away smartly. This is wherein tho weakness of tho Union man lies. He, like several others I have in mind, approaches the job the wrong way. My friend crouches down directly behind the scrummage—a common mistake with nine out often half backs. Taking up such a stand, lie not only leaves two sides open where the enemy can pour round and smother him, but lie le«es precious time—the fraction of a. second may be, and rrtcn is, too late,— by having to turn round to pass tho ball out. Let him take a stand side On to the serum—to the blind or open—just, as it is intended to work tho game. When the ball comes out lie is moving \vith it, and in one action should scoop tho ball out Bmartly to tho five-eighths, whoso position he is able to see all tho while, (the other way the half would need to have eyes in tho back of his head to ascertain the position o" bis five-eighths). Moreover, should tho opposite sido happen to play wing forwards, tin half back, if ho turns side on to .take the bail from the scrum, is able to shield the ball—which is the object —from tho one winger, and, seeing the other coming, should be smart enough to pass it over his head to the five-eighths. Tho half back which we often refer to as being 'too slow' 1 brings this condemnation upon himself by the incorrect attitude he takes up "behind the. pack. Take in the position of the five-eighths while the scrum is'being formed, turn sido on to the scrum, 60 that tho man you are about to pass to is in your gaze all the time; make the pass one i.etiou. Practise this, and you will realise tllo advantages over the old system of rivetting a pair of eyes to the bask row of a scrummage. lluuro stood up to a Jot- of hard, defensive work—and wo know what that. mean 6 with the Union back. It. is a thousand pities this solid-player is not a bit faster. The Union forwards are a light, but fast lot, who play till the whistle blows. The Maroons' vanguard put in several Siose dribbling rushes on 'Saturday. In following up they burst through at top fcpeed. With a little more tonnage they would be hard to beat. Quite a fai- proportion of tho 2000 j.ml odd spectators who foregathered at ti.e Caledonian Ground on Saturday bccamc wildly excited over.the Rugby tussle between tho chosen of Alhambr:-, and that o| Southern. Last year's premiers were favourites. and enjoyed tho ccnfidenco oi the multitude of "rooters" who _ yelled "Akol ake!" or words to that effect, in good plain Southern. A feature of the game, which was exciting enough to try the voico of the most hardened barracker, was the dashing play of the Southern forwards, who from the Mei-ofF to the call of time kept pounding away; at the Alhambra_ citadel. The Southern front-rankers easily beat tho Alhambra pair for the ball, but the efforts of the Southern backs, particularly tho half and five-eighths division, when the leather canio out to them, were for the most part deplorable. It frequently happened that the good work done by those Trojans in tho forward brigade was thrown away by tho crratio passim; of the backs. When it came to real Rugby intelligence in tho pa-ssiug game tho Southern backs, with ono or two exceptions, showed themselves to be in the first primer. The forwards, as previously stated, played a hard Raine of tho no-man-standing order. The whil-i I did not notice any intentional rough play, neither side stopped to beS thr> other's" pardon. Tho Alhambra. backs rarely handled the ball. But the fault v-as not with them. Hence the " compliments" that were flying jound were not altogether deserved. - Beater {or l.ho ball forward, the fifteen good mer nnd tiuo on the Alhambra side could onlj hope to bo up and doing when tho othei side by their reckless passing allowed t,li< Beds' flying brigade in amongst them. Am speaking of this, it struck me that A 1 hambra did not make enough of the mis takes by their opponents. On the iim the Reds stood out. clear-cut against tin enemy.. The few glimpses of effective pais ing shown during tho game by the Alham bra backs cimo from the line. Unfortunately.for Alhambra, Hobson, th< captain, met with an injury which necessi tated his goiug off tho field, and as thi referee ruled that aji injured player coul( not be replaced, the team played for till wholo of tho second spell with only W men It might be wondered if it were not tin means of spurring the team on, for eacl man played with the energy of two after this and at ono time it appeared as if the; were going to burst through the Souther) defence--liko through n, paper hoop. The Alhambra. backs without excoptioi played a sound, useful gariie, and had the; been able to sccuro the ball more frcquentl; would have given a good exhibition of tin passin? game. Dobson, the full back fielded the ball surely, and kicked well making good use of the touch-line. Of th three-quarters Bennett, albeit, making a fc\ mistakes at the outset in fielding the ball retrieved himself as tho game wore»on, am to the finish played well. Slattery, the ex Wellington representative, made a good firs oppearan-M. He is very quick off thliiark, and runs with all his weight, wliicl is considerable. Alhambra's first- try wa scored by the new-comer after a fast sprin over the lino. Slatt:ry was also indirect!; it sponsible for scoring the Reds' secoii' try by heading a dribbling rush, -lakini the ball over the Southern line, when M'licod came fast at tho right moment and, falling on the ball, scored 3 points Coulter, the half back, got tho ball awa; smartly, oil the few opportunities ho bin given him by the forwards, while King am M'Ltod both -played well at five-eighths Tho latter is, I understand, the amateii runner, which explains his undeniable pac< on the football field.' Of the forwards Johnston stood cut by himself, beinj easily the best on bis 6idc. Hobson playei hard up to the time of his injury. Om or two of the vanguard were .evidently no on speaking'terns with the scrums, for i was noticed they did not go too near to d< any damage. Of the Southern backs, Kii.dloy, Eekhold and Havley were the pick. The former a full back played a really sound game, un jr.trrcd by a single error. At all time he took tho ball well, and was not a all bustlid by the opposing forwards chaw ing down upon him. Kindlcy kicked well naiing good use of the toich-iine. Hi collaring, too. was quite first class, the w-n; ho, brought Slattery down on ono oecasio: being (is solid a piece of tackling as tin wuter bus feca Harley did a lot <■ sound work, but he did not meet with muoi support. Eekhold is the most piomisin; ~ 2 fcoathern backs. ' Moreover. ! will say this for him. (hat he shows tlx most in the game, and wJi;i he gains more experience will be quite om of the best wing three-quarters—and bein: possessed of plenty of pace, is a dangeroni man near tli.j goal-line. The five-eighth: aii(i half back, considering the forward: were heeling out Hie half to t hem, playei degrees below standard The half was "tc< Mow in getsinj the ball awav, and tin five-eighth was collared frequently befori lie made a move. 'The forwards "are uro bably the finest pack in Dunedin. Tb.i ha\o excellent . combination, and infuset plenty of dash into their play. Isaac wa: conspicuous throughout a hard came, wii'li Usey. Leydcn, Allen, Olson, aiid Sheehai also -Jid good work A mixed team from, the Pirates Club jour neyed to Matakanui at- JCastcr, and after ft \ei) fast and interesting tnuo were successful in defeating the horn? team by Id points to 8. Die <rome was of a very friendly 1 uatujv, .and .ilip Matnkanui foam showed by their exhibition that, with a Jittle coaching, lhev wou'.d be a very hard team to beat. The forwards played a dashing game throughout, and it would be hard to single out any particular one for ' 0f Ihc lu(:b ' Jloran > Hiirley, and Thompson we r e the most consnieuous, the former especially playing n brilliant gaw at centre three-quarter. The Firakf speak very highly indeed of the treatment received at the hands of the Matakanui people, and the whole team are unanimous in their opinion that it- was the mo=t enjoyable trip they have ever experienced. Th"- recent-opinion of (he Volsh Vet ball Union reversing the deei-ion of the - referee in the Swn'nsea-Leicrster "mntch (r"Snarks the Athletic News of January 2) directs attent'ou fo the anomaly of a disputed try. The referee, a member of the Welsh loo*bill Union, and one of. thorno*-*' capable referees, disallowed a try claimed bv B'-riiihivaite, tho I/oicestev half back, who dived into a scrummage on the Swan-goal-line, nnd touched the hall down, tl'e referee disregarded the claim, and ordered another scrimiiringe ov'side. Front this .scfummage' IWcester eained n trv, whidh. was awarded iind kicke'd a goal. Thi? un' in the last few minutes of'the game, which ended in Swansea winning by

x goal and. a try- to a goal., Appealed to j t by tho Leicester secretary, the referee. 1' readily gave his reasons for. disallowing-tho 1 o try c'.aiined by Eraithwaite, tho said reasons v being that the half back contravened the ii law by hanuliug in the, scrummage,, and I expressed his readiness to staio'tho Msg for v tho English and Welsh Unions. Tho Welsh Union decided that the rcferco was wrong, 1 as was apparent from the first to those c who understood tho rules.' Orice tho ball in 1 a scrummage touches tho. goal-line, or is [ over the line, the penalties attathing to in- j formalities in scrummago play do not apply, s and ally forward, half back, or any player c may touch down,_ and- if such player lie of the attacking side a try is scored, while e if of tile defending side- then a toucli-down j should be awarded. It must be under- ] stood that this is only -an expression of ; opinion of the Welsh Football Union, and that tho point has been referred for'final ' ruliug and decision to the * International i Board. There need be no doubt, as to j what tho decision will lie, ami. the only j pity is that tho point of Leicester's second ( try cahnot bo considered. , At a meeting of tho London Rugby Union 1 Society of Referees, it was decided to submit a number of amendments in the laws to the annual meeting of the English Union , next month. In dealing with the mode of play, the rule now stands; '' If a player, , whiio iioWing or running with the ball, be tackled, and the ball fairly held, he.must at onco pi(t it fairly down, between him and his opponents' goal-line." The revised rule reads, "If a player, while holding or running with the ball, bo fairly held, lie must at once put it down between himself and his opponents' goal-line." Tho word "fairly" is expunged from "down." With , regard to penalties the law .now' reads, "Free kiclra by way of penalties shall he awarded ii any player, bc-ing in' the scrummage, lift-. :i foot from tho ground beforo tho ball has been put into such a scrummage," Tho revisers propose to insert as a marginal note to the above. " When the ball lias passed the first forward it is in the scrummage." This excited some discussion, but it was'eventually agreed to adhere to the suggestion, and leave further discussion to the Rugby Union. Forty thousand spcctato's witnessed the match at Swansea between Wales and Ireland. Shamrock was the favourite adornment of the button-holes. Cork sent a lively contingent, and tile voting blood were as horsey as riding-breeches and leggings could make them. The following table shows the position of the International Championship for tlje season 1905: _ _

"Champions 1903-1, ASSOCIATION. Bt Left Wise,. Next Saturday is fixed (or (lie opening of the Association season, and I hear it is the intention of tlio Northern Club— who, by tlie way, arc to meet their old rivals, the Koslyn—to make quito an afternoon of it. l'he .Wobdhaugli Band is to 1» present, and during the course of the game will give several selections. The Northern Ground is a splendid acquisition to socker, and will in time 1)0 tlio best ground we have: . Association enthusiasts will be glad to hear that the O.F.A. has made satisfactory arrangements with that well-known Association follower, Mr TV. H. Irvine, to take over the secretarial work of tlio O.F.A. It is well-known that the- Asso--ciation work is getting harder every year, and quite beyond anyone who has his ordinary business duties to attend to. I'm sure Association players will agree with mo when I say the O.F.A. has made a wise move. The Kait.angata Club is launching out this year, and lias entered three teamsSenior, •Junior, and Third 'Grade. This speaks highly for the game and tlio spirit of the Kaitangata boys, who, Saturday after Saturday, journey, nt their own expense, to Diinedin for a game of socker. I sincerely trust their efforts will be rewarded this year by taking off more than one first event. Advices from Kaitangata point to tlio fact that good carnival work is being done there, and the sale of tickets is very large. Another acquisition to socker forces is the team at Milton, which has been got together by the energy of our old friend and committeeman Mr A. \V. Parkinson. The Milton team is only playing Third Grade as a start. It is Mr Parkinson's hope that next year he will be ablo to jilaco ■ three teams in the field. More power to him. There is a noticeable increase in teams this year, about seven in all, and it will bo very hard to pick the winners. I do not, however, anticipate that the Northern Club will lave it all its own way, tut I should adviso all clubs to train hard. It is the intention of the N.Z.F.A, to send a team to Sydney this season, and the Selection Committee has been asked to forward to 'Wellington the names of those who will lie able to make the trip should they bo chosen. Names, therefore, should be submitted at once. It is to Ijo hoped that the Schools Committeo will be got. together at once, and tlic wheels set in motion. There is a hard task in front of, it this year, and coaches are asked for by tlie boys. It is also to be . hoped that those referees who will wield (he whistle in the schools matches will use their best endeavours to tench the young idea how to shoot—or, in other words, teach them tho game. I hear that a conference has .been arranged between tho Schools Committee, ,0.F.A., and Referees'. Club to go into several important matters connected with the game, one of which is all-important— that of Rood referees. I trust that referees will be forthcoming this year, and a public appeal be not made necessary, as was last year. There are plenty of old players who should be only too pleased toehold the whistle. Those willing to help are asked to send in their names to Mr B. S. Knox, Australian Widows' Fund. Clubs ju'o reminded that they must look to themselves to find money for ground improvements, as the O.F.A. is not in a position to do so. Marking out of lines and goal-posts and other improvements must Ik> borne by tho club. Captains of clubs are reminded that they must each bring a ball on to the field of play, otherwise matters will go hard with them. ' ' Coupon-holders are notified that they I must return coupons at once to the lion, secretary of the O.F.A. through their club secretary, when a claim for refund will be made on the N.55.F.A., who will, I believe, meet us fairly in. the matter. Winning teams are reminded fliat they must send in reports and results of matches to "Left Wing," care of the editor, who will give them due consideration, , Indications point to Saturday being a fine day, and I sincerely trust that tho opening matches will be gone through without a hitch. I wish all clubs a prosperous season. I I hear that M. Chadwick lias again donned the jersey- for the Black-nnd-whites, but that the little favourite leftwins. W. Morrison, lias decided not to play. S. N. Brown and 11. Sicdebdrg avo again to tlio fore for Itoslyn, and D. and J. M'Millan for Wakari. The Mornington Club is going stron? this year, and has put four teams into the field, and will have to be reckoned with. Waddoll, the New South Wales Association footballer, who toured these parts with the Cornstalks last season, _ is now settled in •Maoriland." • Alfred Slirubb. tlio English long-distance runner, is something of a footballer. Speaking to the writer during .his recent tout of New Zealand. Slirubb asked if the Asso- | ciation ga-n.e throve here. WVn answered in the'affirmative Slirubb _ said lie would I not mind playing a season in New Zealand 'it business would allow him. He is an injidc right. - ' The crip which the-Association eame has I upon the- affections of the Scottish people was demonstrated' at Glasgow (says Ath- ! ietie News), .when nearly 40,000 rceople foregathered at the spurious and splendid ground of tho Queen's Parle Club to witness the renewal of hostilities between the Scottish League and the En?lis)i League. The crowd would not be considered in any wav remarkalJe save for the very uninviting weather which prevailed. Despite I V* 7 .vTVmKl a I .?"AT&F ' w HOW MR DEW CURED HIS COLD. Mr 11. Dew- publisher of ihc Hawthorn and Camberwell Citizen,; at Hawthorn. Victoria. sa-vs: "Willi the beginning of la-st winter, I fell a'victim to &,severe cold, causing an attack of bronchitis. leavine in its train a. persistent, irritating comrli, which annoyed me for several weeks. I heard of numerous cases similar to mine in which relief bad been effected by tho use of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy; and the trial of a N tattle resulted in jrreat improvement. After using, three bottles I was completely cured from the irritation which bad distressed me for so long. ; . Profiting bv this experience, I always keep a bottle of this remedy handy.in the house.'.'. For sale by all dsalen.

tho .wretched conditons, £875 14s 6d was paid at the turnstiles, aud £24.7 8s for use of tire stands and enclosures. The contest, was remarkable in that the Scots led at the interval by tiro goals, and yet England won by 3—2, and conclusively, proved \liat they were a very fine side. Questions answered in Athletic News:— When, a penalty kick'is taken the players , on either side, other than the kicker or ; the .- goalkeeper, may stand where they i please so long as it is outside , the penalty area and within the field of 'play. I am surprised at tho referee's ignorance in ordering all players "behind 1 the ball." , A player waiting •in an offside position,and who tries to head the ball, but misses it, would no doubt be ruled offside by most referees, on the ground that his action was an interference with the play. I think this also answers. your query, Tho point about offside is that a player in that position should efface himself., It miy even bo a breach of Law 6 to run for tlio ball if. that act in any way seems to tho referee to bo an interference, an opponent being close : by, and • perhaps "put oif his stroke," ami so on. . A refcreo is bound not to allow any free kick to be taken until he has -given a signal for it, but lie is not obliged to whistle twice for a free-kick that a goal may bo scored from. A team is allowed 11 men, If one starts with 10, it may at any. time during the gamo take in tho eleventh, even in the last- minute, but no substitutes can be made without the consent of tf he enemy. The ball was going into touch, but the linesman 6topped it before it was out, and it was thrown in by a player as if jt had gone out. It would hardly be fair to punish the player for handling, as he presumably followed the linesman'-!, decision. But the referee, if he saw the occurrence, should have stopped the game and restarted it by a throw-lip, and reprimanded the linesman, as it;was his fault, and not the player's. ! A referee sounding his whistle stops the play. If a plajfer, unheeding or unhearing, runs on and scores, the goal should not be allowed. If the ball accidentally touches a player who is otlside, lie has broken Law 6 as much as if he intentionally played .-the ball. The Northern Club held a final practice on Saturday, and some good form was shown. Morrison and Harrison, as full backs, played a good game, setting in their kicks -with certainty. W. Sinclair at half back played in great stylo, placing well t" the forwards. 'The Timlin brothers, Uren and Scoones, showed up well in the foiward line, and tome good passing rushes resulted. Morrison, who is retiring from active football, controlled the 'same in an able manner. The Northern Third Grade B team were playing on Maori Hill. This team plays a good frame, and, under the capable leadership of Sheen, tho captain, should malte a name for itself. Tho Northern Club is holding n special general meeting (see advertisement) tonight (Thursday). The business is important. and a strong meetini is cxpected, the majority of the vice-presidents of the club having promised to be present.

ATHLETICS. IJ

IST AIWTEOK. I 1

AVith the secretary's compliments comes s 0 hand a. tiekct of invitation to tlio musical t :\cning and presentation of prizes in conicetion with the Dunc<lin Amateur Athletic ] i'lub: The gathering is to be hold ou May I [0, when a larg; muster of athletes is ex- s :ccted. _ ( A professional runner named Patrick, at 1 present in Dunedin, has through the press t lccepted what ho terms L. C. M'Lachlan's l .-hallenge of from £50 to £100 to run him ] 100 yards on any course in Dunedin. I lii reply to the foregoing I have t received the following letter:—Dear > \inatcur, —In a recent issue of tho ' I'inies a pedestrian signing himself W.. i Patrick 'accepts what he terms my chal- < lengo for £50 or £100 over a distance of > 100 yards on any track in Dunedin. Now, 1 1 am not- aware that X have been throwing 1 challenges broadcast. Anything I have j issued of that naturo of recent date ha 3 been over three distances—namely, 100, 120, j 150 yards—and has had special reference to one man—C. J. Morris. Mr Patrick does not state whether ho has deposited any amount as a guarantee of his intentions. Mr l'atrick is to me an unknown quantity oii the "path," fhd I am rather- soeptieal as to the genuineness of tho "doll." A deposit, say, of £20 with you by Mr Patrick as'a guarantee that business is meant might help to dispel the idea that the man and money are illusionary.—l am, etc., L. O. M'Laciuax. Invercargill, May 2, 1905'. Commenting on Arthur Duffey's world's rcootd of 5 2-ssec over 50yds, established at ilic Otago Centre's meeting, an English writer says "the little man is tho speediest in the world up to this distance." One of the stewards at tho International athletic meeting in Sydney was W. A. Low, the ex-New Zealand quarter and half-mile champion, who is now treasurer for George Stephenson's' Musical Comedy Company. Such is fame! At tho coursing meeting last week there ran a dog named after our recent atliletie visitor Shrubb! C. H. Gardner, who represented Australia in the Olympic games at tho St. Louis Exposition, on the American competitors: "I think our men equal them in physique and skill, but we do not have the training facilities or such good tracks to run on." On the first day of the Shrubb-Duffey meeting in Sydney all the competitors wore black bands on their arms out of respect to the late O. D. Graham, tho Queensland athleto, who died suddenly in Sydney a few days after competing at an athletic meeting. The St. Andrew Harriers have suffered a severe loss in the transfer of their captain (Mr l'\ "Williams) from Dunedin to Balclutha. A thorough snort, who took a keen interest in the members, Williams will lie sorely missed. . St. Andrews wislt him every suoocss in his new sphere, and trust he will be among them again very soon, and be able to run in the club's championship, which he has won for two years in succession. At a meeting of the committee of the St. Andrew Harrier's Mr F. Thomas, deputycaptain, was elected to the position of captain, rendered vacant by tho transfer o.f Mr Williams to Balclutha. Mr T. Carpenter was clected to tho deputy-captaincy, and Mr H. Gill was appointed delegate to tho centre. Two very successful evening runs were held by tho ctob during Easter. A Chicago University sprinter named Cat. li'i established a new world's record in the Illinois-Cbicaoo track meet by winning tlie 50yds High Hurdles in 6 4-sscc, beating his own record of 7sce. Speaking of Arthur Duffey's visit to tho colonics, here is a gem from an American paper: "DufFey, it will be remembered, lowered tho world's .record' of 100 yds t.o B§soc, tho previous figures, held by 11. M. Johnson and others, being 9 4-ssec." "Boondi" corrects a statement quoted in last week's issue:—lt was not Mr Lennard's good and speedy friend Bill Lang who was suspected of stiffness. Lang was above that kind of game. Lang, by tho way, backed by Captain Machcl to run a v mile in' less than 4{inin. Ho did it in 4min 2sec, which shows he was a clinker; and he was a pretty runner also. "Old Athlete," writing to Svdney Daily Telegraph iinont Shrubb and Duffoy: "You sneak of Messrs Shrubb and , DufFey as the two best men in the world at their respective distances.. As regards the former, he undoubtedly is the best distuncc runner :n the world. Nobody disputes that. But. Dulfey is really only an examination champion. Ho lias been a firstclass man, but no longer holds the title amateur champion, and was never anywhere, near the very best professional form Is 'is only fair that facts should he so j stated ithat aihletes should not be under anv mistake." [Oulfev lias never been referred k> in the Daily Telegraph as the best man. in the world, for Morton, the English champion, hss defeated him several times. Our correspondent i? distinctly wrong in stating that DufFey "n'e?er was anywhere near the very best professional form." DufFey holds tho world's accented records over 50yds, 60yds, 75yds, ,jnd 100 yds.] The foregoing brings forth the following reply from "Old Athlete": "Yon state I am perfectly wrong alwuf DufFey in my statement, that ho was never near the best pjofessional form. Your reason iVtliat he has world's records for 50yds and 60yds, etc. Ti'it, I admit, is true, buj the best professionals have no sprint records. At Sheffield, where the scratch man runs from the 71J or 72{(very peculiar distance), there is no official timekeeper. Hutehins, the fastest man ever born, was never 'officially timed, even over a recognised'lOOvds. These 50' and 60 yards' raw.-, nre quite recent inventions. There .are very few expert and reliabletiinekeeMrs'in thi- world. In the profes-sional-days at Botiuiy and Carrington the official timekeeper uied to put up absurd times. Tt> give ono instance of timekeeping. and to show what, sprint records arc worth. I will • take .T, H. Fcmptoii, of New Zealand! . This amateur lias records of. 91sec and 9 p .4-ssee for 100 yds." In Svdney, at a private trial, \V. H, Williams (the pro.), gave him syds in 100 yds' . go and. caught him. In the amatcw championship .the same week lie (Hempto® won, beating W. Macpberson (who also had a 9Jseo j record) in under G. L. Wain's i timekeeping! In England,' at the amateur ' cjaunpionshiy; after Uirco montlis 1 training | under Hutchi'is, Hemptca was ltcaten in

his heat in 10 2-ssec. Wha{ are Hempton's records' roally worth?"—[Clin this be flic jealousy-of vhe . profosional runner over the 'amßtcur.—AliATgiin?]. , Following ai'o some of-tho best previous performances of this Sydney University Nigel Barker, who defeated the, American' Duffcy jn the^.lOflyds'lnternational Scratch Kacc and won tho ?sydsfFirst Class Handi; cap in Sydney vUNApril 15: Won College Clip, 1900 and 1901;' won Great Public Schools' Championship; 100 yds, 1900, 10 2-ssec' (record); , 440 yds, 1901, 53sec (rccord); in 1901, won the triplo over 100, 220. ftnd~44o,-yards. At, University_ sports (1902), won University . Championship (100 yds), 10 1-S.SCC, ■ heating H. H. Hunter (Victoria)-; also 440yd5.(51 Wsec) and. Long Jump (20ft Olin); -1904: 100 yds, in 10 3-lOscc; 100 yds Champion New South Wales, 1903-4, and sccondVin 1905. In Australasian championships, 1904, lie was second in 100 yds, beaten by six -inches, by H. H. Hunter (Victoria); won 220 yds heat in 22 2-5.500, and final in' 22 3-ssep, both Victorian records; won 440 yds in 50isee. Tho other Sydney competitor, Stanley 'Rowley, who, finished within. a foot of Barker in the,big event-, lias not raced for nearly five years. , His record is as follows:— 100 yds Championship-N.S.W:, 1896, i 10 l-ssec; 100 yds Chaimpioiiship Australa- I sia,'lß97, lOsec; 200 yds Championship Australasia, .1897," 22 3-sscc; 200 yds Champion-] ship N.8.W., 1898; 100 yds • Championship' Australasia, 1899, 9 9-lOscc; 200 yds Clfampionship Australasia, 1899,'22 l-ssec; 100 yds Championship N.&W.'i 1900, lOsec; fourth in 100 yds Championship of England; third iu 100 yds Championship of World (Paris): third in 60yds Championship of World (Paris); -lioldcr of 100 yds New South Wales record, lOsee'j- and 120 yds, 12scc, Australasian record; 200 yds, 22 l-sscc. In the athlctie contest between Cambridge University ,and London Athletic Club sonic notable performances were registered. The 100 yds "was won by W. Brass (Trinity) in lOisee. A. 11. Welsh (Trinity) carved out a slashing mile in' 4miu 21 3-ssec. llon'ard-Srnith (London A.C.) won the High. .lump; clearing sft lOiin. At the same meet lost year he did 6ft. IJ. B. May (London AX.) won tho Hammer, with a throw of 130 ft lflin. Tho 120 yds Hurdles went to IT. 11. Tcall (Cambridge) ill 16 3-ssce. S. Abrahams, won the Broad Jump, clearing 21ft llin. H, Van Namen' (Cambridge), secure! the Quarter in 57 3-ssec. Tlin Half wont to .T. If. Spink (Cariibridgc) in 2min .Jeee. ' Mitchie (of Trinity) won tho Weight-putting with 37ft BJiti, and A. R. Churchill won tho Twomiles in 9min 37sec. -

A most remarkable athlete is a youth named Moullen, of the California School of Mechanical Arts. • Moullen was the hero of the athletic meet which brought together the school athletes of California, Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, and Lowell at Berkeley Owl on March 25. Moullen bad his right foot injured some timo ago, which necessitated amputation. An artificial wooden foot, was put oil. Despite'this Moullen is one of the best pole vaulters ii: the Academic League, is a champion hammer-thrower, and can play football in American 'Varsity style. Tivo school records were broken by tho youth with the artificial foot. Moullen created a new record ill the l'ole Vault by clearing the bar at- 10ft BJin, and established new school figures for the Hammer Throw by an effort of 157 ft lOin.

"With the compliments of Sir G. J. lirucc," a member 01 t-ha Exccutife of the New South AVales Amateur Athletic Association, comes to lm'nd copies of the programmes ismied 011 the occasion of the Interstate Sports meeting, held in Sydney on Anril 8, and tho International Spores meeting at which Shrubb and Duffcy competed in Sydney on April 15. In both programmes Mr Brace has gone to some trouble in filling in the.names of the placed men together with the times for each event. Tho programme for the International meeting is quite an elaborate affair, containing 011 the front, pago portraits of Meiers Shrubb and Duffcy. Wlia# strikes one on perusing tho programme for the afternoon's sport is tho number of events it was attempted to crowd into the time—2.4s to 4-.55. Thus in 2i hours it was expected to get. off 19 events exclusive of licats, or with heats 36. Little wonder the Fivc-milo race, tho last went, on the programme, was run in semi-darlmess. On tho buagln in the Five-mile Handicap a Sydney jjapor comments': The muddle over the Five-mile Handicap at the Sydney Cricket Ground spoiled a successful afternoon's. racing. It was bad enough to have started the event in the failing light without getting bothered over Iho number of laps. Who was to blame h hard to say, becausc the lap-takers were interfered with by people who had no right to bo on tho oval, and by oilier officials. Shrubb was much concorncd over the long starts he was asked to eivo, particularly the Zniin' ssec to 11. C. Griudal, who last year won the Five-mile Cross Country Championship in 29min 46=ec, on a ground which was not conducive to fast time. Shrubb, therefore, knew he would liavo to l>e almost at Ilia best to win, but consented to start. He made the paeo merry, and passed op-1 ponent after opponent, "until nearly four miles were completed.' Then he was about! a lap to the bad and gave tin, It seems ho hud some difficulty in ascertaining his exact position in tho lace. Tho public, however, was afforded an excellent idea of Ilia ability, and everyone was surprised at the way he kept the ono unco throughout, and the manner in which !.e would spurt to leave an opponent. It is evident he does not believe in making (lie pace for anyone. The Caversham Harriers have not boon long in registering a win. A. E. Rowlands, tho energetic scarctary of the club, was successful in winning the Mile Walk at. the T'ioneer. at Chvistehurcli on Easter Monday. Judging by the time, ho must have been in rare form. Should ho walk as well during tho flat season tho C.II. will have at least one prize-winner in their ranks. The Caversham Harriers have mack a splendid start. Tho thanks of the club arc due to the officials and Wnibers of the Civil Service and Dunedin Harriers for their kindness in attending the initial meetings and invitations to their runs. Special mention should be made of Messrs Melville and Mackintosh (C.S.IL), and Musker, Brickell, and Jackson (I).II.).

CRICKET.

liv Long Sup. Tho Australians commence their first match against the. Gentlemen of England at ttie Crystal Palace to-ilny. Tho Ofcago representative cricketer, "Jerry" Austin, swung his bat to some purpose during, the Easter holidays. Playing lor a "mixed" team of Carisbrook atQuccnslown, the Ctirisbrookian hit up 103 in very attractive style. By'Hlic way, Austin purposes-'playing hockcy during the winter ' with tho.Dunedin gj'flinastio "shinty'' experts. It. Wilkio, the cx-Olairo representative, took part in the'annual match between the shipping companies of New South Wales and Victoria, Playing for' New South "Vyales. he isoorcd 21 and 9, and in Victoria's only innings he took four wickets for 24runs. ■ Commenting on my remarks on "bnlli" soil, a Sydney writer says: "Surely there is a sufficiently good soil for tho purpose of making wickets to be found in New Zealand." The cricket season in "Victoria was brought to a conclusion oil April 15, when the association pennant was won by tho Melbourne Club, with East Mc'bourno as runners-up. A case of importune to crickctcrs was heard at. tho Accrington County Court, \ylien John Usher, cricket professional, of Cromiiton, near Manchester, claimed £50 from the officials of the Lancashire Cricket League. Usher's case was that 'when he was cricket professional-at Wlialey, tho Rishton Club wanted to engage him for ono Lancashire League match, hut the chairman and secretary of the Lancashire League telephoned that Usher had been blacklisted, and Risliton must not play him. The'league had refused'to give any reason "for this , refusal. Usher said Ilaslingden signed him for £125 for one season, but through being blacklisted lie had to take an engagement for £102 10s in tho Central Lancashire Leagfte. Usher admitted having lieen fined £10 by the Lancashire League, ami having apoloi gised for haying said to Hi ley, tho Ne'.son cricket professional, at an important stage' in. the league competition' that Nelson had no chance, and if Riley -jrould bowl loiwely ■jt might be worth a sovereign. Usher admitted having betted at horse-racing and cricket, matches. hut never aeainst his own side. After hearing plaintiff's case, the further hearing was adjourned. A. Sydney Ee/ereb reader, who saw "Boondi's" notes on «orae stnnge cricketir e items,' .sends along i a-' cas« which would require a cricketing Solomon to decide. Two hack-country teams—tho. Pike's Cully' and Tosum -Flat—were wresting for fame, ' when .the" former champions, wlio were batting.;'had' fvy'o..wickets, to fall,, and "only wanted a few.;fuhs :to.win. At this critical juncture a Pike's Gidly. ]iero skied a ball, to leg, and a 'Possum Flatwarriar made a neat catch.-; The bntsmoir attemplod to steal a ruii, biit- thes.'Possum Flat patty, by way of making'-ttoublv' sure. : knocked down the .wicket at tbe other end. • Then the 'Possum Flat' or home team's rose to'tlifi occasion with- the lordly air of "another -Daniel come to- judgment." and gave his decision thus: "One cove's run out: the other' cove's caught, out. therefore the both of thcm.is Jhc Pike's.Gully captain was doing hisllvest to the 'Possum■ Flat rumpirc. that lie, was'a born ass, and-.his decision Vwas sinmly absurd, when a lean and lanky youth in soi'.ed

flannels camo up, dragging his, bat after linn, ami drawled: "Sav. Mister Umpire, where do I come in? -. If them two fellers is out, wot about-me? X ain't been in at .all yet, and aeeordin' to' your.'jackass.. . decision I can't go in coz I'm the eleventh man. I'll luve nopardner,■'•so. we! 11.bo playinVyouse covei a'man. short." . "H'rol" said the umpire, considerably staggered, but not in the least inclined to give in "this is a bit of a tangle, suttinly. If you haven't .been, in youcan't very well be out, and yet. you can't bat-by yourself, becauz this isn't comic opera an important match—sp I; think the best thing to do'll bo to mark you down as absent, or hurt too bad to play." "Yes, lam hurt,. but not in the place or way you mean," was the reply, of the ambitious batsman. But the umpire was two stone heavier than him, so the decision stood, and the home team went off to catch a wallaby for the cricket banquet at night. . In the-course of an article on "Decadence of Sport," which'appeara in'this'month's Baily's Magazine, tile author, "Spartan," has something to say about the payments made to amateur cricketers. This re- , numeration may, he says, be a necessary evil, and. may have como stay; but with the multitude of first-class gentlemen, university, military, and others,' who now , play cricket, perhaps in the proportion of ' 100 to'lo, as compared with those in the , ■ 'forties or the 'fifties in' the last century, ho believes that the best sport in cricket might . still bo had if . such payments were more | generally discountenanced in tlio future, and | if each county had to depend, as of old, upon the freely-given aids of its gentleman I in support of the paid'professionals, who . would always form the backbone in every team. The less, indeed, that cricket be- ■ comes-a "cut-and-dried' 1 eanie the better. Wo venture to deprccatc the eternal sames ness of tile identically same eleven going from place to place, arriving half-fagged. , out, after a long night's iourney, going in J to bat in one stereotyped and prescribed ' order, without reference to tho bowling, or . the weather, or tho circumstances, matters ' which used often to be a matter of general- • ship and management in other days, and ' need often to snatch a 'victory, or at least ' to prevent a draw, by putting the. hitters ? and fast scorers to the front when tho ' more correct artists would lie losing time \ elegantly, and leaving thc'liitable balls alone 1 in best scientific style. Less playing to tl& > gallery and to the press, and an absolute j disregard, not to say contempt, for the J "averages" list in every Monday morning's t newspaper, would be desirable, Theso are '• Bomo of the items, which we would like to press upon all who wish to preserve cricket '! a* Hie manly and sportsmanlfko game which '1 it had been for nearly 200.years, until overo done lawn pilches and heavy, rollers and, r one may overdone means of locomotion' i, for one particular set of players deprived. > it of that "glorious uncertainty" and variety' u which was notoriously ite chiefest charni,

LAWN. TENNIS.

By Lob.

The annual tournament of the Otago Lawn Tennis Association was brought to a close on Saturday, April 29, all tho ovents being completed. In the Men's Handicap Singles, Sinclair beat ](. S. Brown after a vejry good game, Sinclair well deserved his win,' as he • pla/cd most consistently tho tournament. It lie had a little more stamina to onablo him to stand a hard' match, he would lie able to give any of the cracks a good run. In- the Indies' Champion Singles Miss Campbell defeated Miss Wliitehouso 9—5. Miss Wliitehouso played very well up .to 5 all, but -after that seemed to lire, She played a much freer game than Miss Campbell, who is very disappointing in a- match. Tile Combined Handicap Doubles fur nishod some exciting matches.. Whito and Miss W. Hislop beat Salmond and Miss Whitchouso .9—6. White seemec 1 to disconcort. Miss Whitchouse altogether, as she seemed unable to get them away from him at the uet, Miss Fiislop p'dyacl very well, her' driving being especially good, Dr Maries and Miss -Marks easily accounted for Sino'.air and Miss Maclean. Sinclair was very much oft colour, a ad only seemed to begin to wake up when tho game was lost. The semi-finals were exceptionally close. The game between Dr Marks and Miss Marks and S. A. Brown and Miss Crawford was 8 all, and was finally won by Brown after his opponents had held the vantage three times in succession, Whito and Miss W. Hislop had to concede a very heavy handicap to Monkman and Miss I). Histoy, but seemed to have tile match in hand as the scoro was B—68 —6 in their favojr. The un-. expected happened, h'owevor,; and Mail:man eventually won a most exciting game 9—B. The last stroke of the game was. lost by White ill a most unfortunate fashion, a smash by Monkman which was going out hitting White's racquet before lie could get out of the waj,. and so the point went against him. • Tho final between Brown and Miv. Crawford and Monkman and Mi&s D. Hislop resulted in an easy victory for tho fci'iiiCT pair. The Ladies' Handicap Doubles wflre won by Misses Campbell and Whiteiioiiso,J/mx opporicnts, Misses Marks 'and Ciwftul,; making a very poor fight of it. Mk? "Wliitehouso put in sonic very neat net work, and a lesson, in this respect might, bo taken by Dtagb ladies. t After the conclusion of the Ladies Doubles, Mr W. T. Monkman, president of the association, presented the" prizes to the successful competitors, and in the course of his remarks congratulated players on tho success of the tournament. The prescnco. o[ visitors from Ashburlon, South Canter-, bury, and Naseby had added greatly to the interest in' the various events, and ho was pleased to see the names °f Misses Crawford and Wliitehouso and Mr Thompson on the prize list. The championship had again been annexed by Mr -AVhito, and as this .was that,-player's third Win in succession,. tllO cup became his absolute property.- / Tho "cup was presented-by, Mr Frank Hyauis in 1891. : and was won by Mr Koch in 1894 and_ 1895, and by Mr A, Borrows in '1896, 1897. and 1898, thus becoming his property. He, however, presented the cup for reconipetition, and after being won by 0. H. Broad in 1901, K. Salmond in 1902,' was won by C. I. White in 1903, 1901, and 1905. Tho Championship Double were won by S. A. and R. S. Brawn, tho final maich'belng one of the finest games cvei' seen on tho courts, and he' heartily congratulated the winners on their attaining to championship honours. The win was an extremely popular one, Messrs White and Salmond being tho first to congratulate their opponents. Tho Ladies' Championship was again won by Miss Campbell, but this had happened «o often that ho (Mi- Monkman) could scareelv remember how many years Miss Campbell had held tho title. Tho best thanks of the association wore duo to Mr W; 11. Irvine, tho gefiial secretary, to whose courtesy and tact the success of the tournament was largely due, also to Mr Dnggar, who lent invaluable assistance all through the tournament. lie desired also to thank the Kaituna and Otago ladies for the hospitality shown by them in providing refreshments, and also those sentfcmcn who had kindly acted as umpires for the various matches. Mr White, on receiving the cup, said that after much deliberation lie had made up ilis* mind lo present the cup to the association. It was a decided wrench to do so, as such a ctip was only won after strenuous exertion, and it carried witli it memories of many a- hard struggle. He thought it a pity, however, that the record of the association's championship- since 1894 should disappear, and he had decided to offer the cup to the association on dition that it was held as a, perpetual challenge cup. never to bo won. outriejht' by any player. Tho cup s-liou'd have the name of the. champion engraved on it, and should lm held by him for tho yean and in addition the association should give a suita-hlo trophy as a memento of the championship, i Before concluding lie (Mr White) f wished to ■ add his congratulations to thoso of Mr • Monkman on the Messrs Brown winning the Champion Doubles. Tliov had got • into the final for two years previously, and ■ had taken their beatiner like the true sports i •they were, and now tliat (he tables were s' turned he trusted that he and Mr Salmon 1 could take their beating in a like manner. Cheers were then given, for the champion. Mr Monkman, on beh.alf of the associa--1 lion.-said he had the greatest- pleasure in 1 accenting the cup from Mr White., subject ! to .the conditions mentioned. All players must recognise .the generous spirit which prompted Mr White to make flip prescntaj tion.. Ho himself "was glad that the re--1 cords wre not poing • to leave. the - as-:o- ---•_ ciution, but would row lie held by it altogether. The other .'irizps .were then pre--1 seated, and cheers. fr?< the . winners of, the I Champion Doubles ; and for the secret-irj ! brought the.proceedings to.a. conclusion. .

In a draw, for the Davis Cup Australasia drew a byo ill tho first Touiid, and in the second- round :meet Austria. . This latter match should be aii'easy win for the colonial team, and in the third they will probably' meet America, which .team has to meet Franco and .Belgium. The round lo decide, tho challenging'team will be played at Wimbledon- oii July 17/18, and 19, and the final /match, against ,-.England, the holders, will takoiplacc'-the following week. Austria,"' Australasia's C.first; 'opponent,' enlered "last: year,'. but 'forfeited to Belgium, of her-leading players aro up to firstclass English form, for'iione of them eonld make oven.a? against M. ,1. R. Ritchie, the_ Engli«h" player, who won the championship" or Austria last. year. A picture of interest to tennis players and enthusiasts ill this week's issue ol the Olago Witness .is' a reiiroductioii of the menibere of the Australasian tennis, team who have sailed for'Eiiglahd to compete for the Davis Cup at the world's ,'championships, Tile Davis Cup competitions, for which Australasia' lias entered a team this year, are recognised to,be for-the world's championship at lawn tennis,-' Tho cup was first.offered by Mr Dwieht P. Davis, of America, in 1900, to bo held as a perpetual challenge cup. .• Tho first year a challenge was issued by.tho English Association, but

tho team sent to America, consisting of A. \V. Gore, E. D. Black, and 11.' R. Barrett;, was easily' 'defeated, mainly owing to the use by'tlio Americans- of the now famous "American ' twist service." Undaunted, .England again challenged in 1901, hut as a representative team could not be got together, the, cliallengo was withdrawn.. In 1902 a strong team, consisting of R, P. Doherty, H. L. Doherty, and Dr ,T. Pim, had another try to capture tho cup, but met with a second defeat by 3 matches to 2; Then in 1903 tho British Isles team, composed of the Doherty Brothers anthll S. Mahony, mrj3e their memorable and successful effort, ami'the :inpst remarkable series of, matches that has yet been played eventuated.. Mahony was" not played, but tho Dohertys, in'a brilliant and "decisive manner, thoroughly routed the Americans to the tunc of 'four, matches -to one, the sole victory 'credited the -losers lieine secured on a forfeit. The cup thus found a resting place in England, where, uchvitbstanding an attack by Belgium ami' France last ypir, it still remains, For -tills year's- competition Australasia has nominated a team consisting of E, Brookes, A. W. Dunlon (captain), H. A. Parker, and A. F. Wilding. The team cannot in the absenoo of Dr G. G. Sharp and H. Rice (both.'of whom were not available) he considered . thoroughly representative, 'but nevertheless it is a strong combination. Brcolies-; holds . the championship of' Victoria; graving secured that honour, for the. past,'-'three years, and it is a moot question whether', he or Dr Sharp is at present the strongest player in Australasia. Parker holds tho championships of ,South Australia, and Tasmania. Duplop has'not appeared in firstclass tennis for a, couple of years, but at his best' is a splendid all-round man. and one of tlw finest natural tennis players Australia has produced. Wilding, who lias been at the Cambridge University for the past two years, is eligible to play for Australasia: li'o being, on, account of bis birth,. A; Jfew Zealandec. ' - Ho, othersuccesses,': last -season', seemed the championship of .Scotland. : and' is .reported to be.one of the six best players in England at present. - .

GYMNASTICS.

Br Parallels.

Exorcise 111}- body, for .'tis a, wonderful machine. I wonder how many, of the youth of Dunedin can say. that they oxerciso their bodies in a proper maimer. Kipling says many nowadays consider themselves athletes because they wiytcU a football or cricket match and, criticise the game, but is that' doing them any physical good? livery young, fellow should lollow up some form of sport,, as it makes him a man. He is a poor .creature who ;Jias" to admit ho indulges itv no form'of'exercise, and there is do excuse ■ nowadays,', as 'we have fully, equipped gymnasiums' in-.every, suburb, besides football,'" liarrier, and other clubs. 'Tho Dunedin Gymnasium was well • attended on Friday evening, and it. is expected that tliis week the members will roll up in full force.' Squads under the captain and deputy-captain were put through a good night's .'exercise. This club has some splendid talent this season; the new members all-have the making of good gymnasts, and some,.are already showing noticeableimprovement. l'V C. Liggins was present-jon Wednesday,, and. ofticiated at_ the.' piiinci ■ for the run round' at the finish, which was executed in a very crcdithblo manner. .. The club should 'bo able to pick strong teams for the competitions this season, as' W.',' H. Matthews,. G. G. Austin, n. G. Sie'debcrg, and A. Al'Master arc all showing fine form, while .T, Robertson, M. J. Lamacli, E. Wilson, IC. James, L. Downes, E. il'.Afaster, N. Powell, awl others are improving nightly. Some of the new .members, should -.likewise secure places'in one of the teams. J --. • .'Arthur'Hudson 1 was ;dowii having a-look on'on Friday'evening.: He -talks ot starling again shortly. " Another' fine' gymnast, W. Dcy,- is also going to'have another go. In form, Billy taies'some beating, on slow cxcrciscs. ■ . 1 The Mornington Club • had good v'att-en- : dances' -last week, when some excellent classwork was gono through. "'Captain Callaway is-as enthusiastic as eVer, ", and wliilo -lie is a(;-the holm, tlio success of the club is'assured! ' V ( , ~ •The; Trinity Club is, lieing well attended. Captain Downes has not • been able -to attend very regularly of late, but Deputycaptain. Mowbray 'has 'been carrying , the class'on in good style.. This, club, has some very promising.young, gymnasts, and-, tliey will no doubt- bo heard'of before the close of the season. •" ,- \ v . • '.The High: Street->.old - Boys'. Club is flourishing, .an'd; the members aro now working hard. . This dub -'shouldho .'strong .when' . 'the .'competitions ': c6riie.' : ' -round again. Captain Gollar and Deputy-captain Tage are untiring in their efforts tovbring 'the members along, and it must ho pleasing to' them to • see the improvement already noticeable in some of the members. The High Street Ladies' Club was fairly well attended last "Wednesday. Mr .T, Robertson is now acting as instructor, in place oi 35. 13. Wilson,"who found lio' had not tho time at his disposal to act, as instructor this season. The. club is very fortunate in securing the,-services of 'such ,a; capable -instructor as Mr Pi-ohertson, 'who is a very efficient gymnast-and a splendid club-swinger. Most of last , season's memIwrs aro still to the fore. The Misses M'Beath, Boss, and others aro showing splendid form for so early in the season. I hope to soe a ladies' competition arranged this season. The Trinity I,adits' Club is being largely attended this season, and the members are working very hard. Most of last year's members are again to the fore, and a successful season is- anticipated. 1 The Hoslyn' Ohilr anticipates, a successful season, as the 'membership is, if anything, larger ; thaii last seasonS'V .T. Robson, their enthusiastic; captain, is as keen as ever, and it wilt':not be his fault if the club docs not give a gopd account of itself. Tho annual meeting of the Otago Gymnastic Association ; was held on Saturday night. It was suggested that the exercises for' the Second' Grade competition should not be of such a hiqh siandard'as they were last season, but the meeting approved of Volunteers being included. It was suggested that efforts should bp made to hold a display at the end of the season. Is there no chance, of a contest being arranged with Wellington this year? If not ■ an intcrpro. contest, could not die Dunedin Club arrange a contest with the Wellington Physical Training School? Though the Dunedin are not<|uitc so strong as they were a season or so ago, still they oould pick a.:very decent- team, and it . would be very interesting to see how oiir crack: club compares with the crack club from the Km'pire Oily The North Dunedin Gymnastic Club' is having very fair mnsicra .lately. there, being an' average, attendance • of.'. 26 members nightly.' The active membership' ■ soj far this quarter is 33, which will bo considerably increased as the season-advances.'The leaders :of squads-last week were Deputycaptain . TT. ; Robertson, _ r , Wbittaker, and Dreaver, Whittaker having charge of the ; seniors, Dreaver .the' juniors, and Robertson the new-comers." The" new-comers are a very-likely lot of gymnasts, and are showing 'under the-able tuition.of 'the. depulv- ! .captain •,considerable • imorovement.- The r .work in .tliH',:.squad : „Js".gradn'aflir' getting . harder.' and the aim of the leader is rica.tr : no.=s and precision, The most- noticeable "lijst week in were Russell, I Dow, Arthur, Jl'Kay'(2)# and J. Robinson. , The juniors are ; comiiig on wonderfully, i the most r?insnipiinn3 Piping Timbers. Stc- ! vens. Frew. (2). Thompson. M K.av. and i Higgms.:- The-last-named.'who is a, wellI n)ade : youhg fellow,' is-the makings of n • first-class igyHinast."--, - 1 .'The class of work set the seniors bvWhit- " taker is very intricate,• and varied. Punlje, j Weir. Lemon; M'Donald. and Moir arc j. vapidly . l'ciaming . their '.old -form. Maw . seems.' to be /improving .every melit. anil , should turn out a top-notelier. Wo regret . , report that'the popular captain of this

club (R. Baber) is on the sick-list just now. "A hint to members (new-comers .in particular) .Jwlieii at practice,;: pay . the'.closest; attention: to the exorcises sot bv the instructors; when doing tho. exorcises keep your logs perfectly straight; knees and licols together, with toes pointed away from you, and eyeS up. : When finishing ■ ari exercise land on .tho'imattress .\yith' hands to the. sides arid legs'toother. Constant attcndanco ' at ' practices '*■ will'- •'••help" members to obtain thnt proficienoT which is ''characteristic of tho North End Club.': :• Harriers, footballers, and athletes, in general should, attend, this club. The exercises l gone through of an evening; (Saridow's dumbbell and running exercises, including gymnastic) ddvelop every muscle in the body, Sandow says- if you want ty' succeed in any branch of ' sport you must develop the rest of the muscles of the body besides the ones used in thnt particular sport.

SHIMMING.

By Side-Stkoki Miss Annette Kellerman, the champion; lady swimmer of Australia, left Adelaide for London, by tho Orient liner Ophir: A Sydney paper states that George Head, who was a success amongst the alna< teurs a couple-of years back, hut who joined tho professionals somo time ago r and who has been managing a baths atBroken Hill fort: a. year, left for England by tho-Ophir. K-Md'suys that lie has nothing particular.. in view, although he expects to ifiake a'match with Ilobbs, tho champion of the British Navy, over distances of three, or four, miles.' He Says that lie',' may.possibly take on the Channel swim, but.'this all' depends" upon .whether lie can get the financial backing necessary to the undertaking. (Some of tho previous, attempts, liavo been • financed by one .or other of i the. big'.English journals.)' 'Head says that ■he 'is .a better swijrimer than ho was when he went to England, in ISOE, and although all records put up by .him have been lowered by the amateur champion, Koran, lie holds the professional reCords as well as the titlo of champion.

•At a meeting of the Canterbury Centre of. the Now Zealand Amateur; Swimmingj Association the President' stated that the Australasian championship meeting would, i:r tho ordinary course, bo held in New Zealand during the 1905-1906' season. He thought that it would be worth while' for the council to postpone, the chumpioiisnips for a year, in order that they might be. held in' Christchurch at the time of the International Exhibition..: He moved that tho council should be recommended to alter the date of the championship meeting to tho 1906 1907 season, and that inlthe event of the date, being altered'the centre .should apply for permission to hold the championships. The motion was carried.—A letter was received from the council stating that tho New South Wales Association proposed to scud B. B. Koran, champion of the ■State, to England, to compete in tho English championships and the King's Cup Race. The New South Wales Assofljation asked for subscriptions towards. the fund for providing ICeran's expenses. Several members oxpressSd the opinion that the matter .was one for Australia, 4ind it'was' dceided that 'no action should .be taken.A. Wickham has 'been . competing in Queensland, .and lias been proving himself a great draw,- big .crowds being present on cach occasion. He did tho 100 yards in 60Jscc in frcsb .watcr, and heavy at that; and practically won all the best events of the programme. The lteferee publishes an, interesting letter from its American correspondent, ill which he states that ,lames Xl'Uiisker, who is described as the American professional champion swimmer, has issued a challenge to lVcy Cavil! and Joe Nuttall, champion of England, to meet , him in, a series of races to decide .the world's championship. M'Cusker's intention .is to swim against both Cavill ,and Nuttall as a team, hut stipulates, that the distances shall bo. 100 yards, 1000 yards, one, five; and ten miles, with a side bet of 5000dol, A curious and remarkable stipulation is that only sseo shall elapse' between the races.., Mr W. W, Hill, the lion, secretary of .the New South Wales Amateur Swimming Association, has been selected by the Keran Fund Committee to accompany, the champion on his tour to England: ' The report regarding the probable visit of Cecil Ilealy to England is premature. It is understood that the 100 yards champion has never given any serious consideration to the matter. Even had he been selected to go with Keran, it is doubtful whether lie would have gone, owing to business reasons. j On the 18th inst. Keran had another try to lower the 220 yards World's record, which lie shares 'with Fred. Lane. The champion made his attempt at the. Pyrmont Baths at. the carnival ■ hold by . the local club .in aid, of the -fund to send 'him to England, but once- again failed. He did not start at the exact time, arid lost close on a second, but he afterwards swam well, fatlintr. however, to figures by two-fifths of a sccond. His time was 2min 29sec, while the record is 2min.2B-3-ssec. The contest was • exciting, as Kejan just managed to defeat L. Murray (9sec) by a, touch, with. E. Craig (7sec) third. '

."OWING. THE INVKRCARGILL TOURNAMENT. (Special to the .Daily Times.) Well, yes, it did rain! There's no gainsaying that fact, or, as a patriotio Southlander, I should bo in a hurry to deny most stoutly the possibility of our annual bowling festival being interfered with by tho weather. But this time there's no getting away from It. However, even the great amount of rain was powerless to damp the spirit of enthusiasm that characterised tlie meeting, and both those who played and those who watched had ample, opportunities for noting ■" A thousand incidents that stir the mind 'l'o pleasure such as leaves no sting behind. Bowlers are supposed :to l>e pre-eminently jolly good fellows, and there was certainly no lack of jolly goodfcllowship among those who assembled un the lnvereargill greens;. but I : am euro that no one ivill grudge a special compliment in this connection ;to Payne's and, Dall's rinks. The losers in tournaments form sucli a large majority that learn to take defeat philosophically,. lint these two teams had the appearanco of absolutely enjoying it.- In (ho ordinary Rink Match Payne was beaten by R. Taylor—rather, I should say, his team was,": for Payne himself played a rattling game,—and, he wns quito' jolly over it; in the Champion game, when, lie lost , to Hain by one point, after what has been termed "the finest, game playoil in the tournament," he was as warm in his congratulations to the North-Knd skip .as the most 'enthusiastic barraolier, and his men showed the same fine spirit. Verily, it'-was a good tiling that the vice-president of the N.Z.B.A. decided to take' part in tho games, as it gave Southlanders a better opportunity of knowing him than is provided by tho Dunedin and Ghristchureh 'gatherings, Dall and co. likewise have made themselves most popular in lnvereargill.. -They, played the game fou all -it was worth; they were as keen on winning as any, players in the.competition; yet so pleasantly did they carry oil tli.cir part of the-.con-lest,' so freely did they accord their meed of praise for an opponent's display, ofj-skill, and withal so generously-• did-'- Dail- Himself refrain from commenting on ; ;two-.br ; .threo "flukes" that lost .liim the game against Hain, that a splendid object lesson was afforded as to how the gentle game of bowls-should be played. ■ It [was generally considered, before .a bowl was thrown, that Lock's Gore team- had as good a chance of .winning as any that had entered. Wilson "is a, first-class lead, and for the most part lie played' up -to his reputation. True, lie was somewhat," off colour in the final match against the' North rink, his opponent;. Wallace,'' beating him easily; but lie did quite \vell chough in the other games to' save-him any qualms— and I heard liim giving uttcrauco to some— on that account. Indeed, 'but for his wonderful accuracy, Sneddon would have beaten Lock for the section win, of. that there-can b e no manner of doubt. How Dewar gets so much success puzzles me. ' .He .has a most awkward delivery, and sometimes almost falls over—ll. Smcaton, by .'.the way, is like, him'in this respeot,—hut-the bowls seem to get there all the same. ;W. P. 'Craig is reckoned bv some -to be- the strongest man in the rink, and certainly -he played a fine game, . which helped vnvy . materially ; to placing Core on top.' He plays very-straight lidwls, and there might have been- .v catastrophe had AV. Dall been present ■ with his testing! madiine. Craig is such ai'stcrling player that I think 'it a pity lie doesn't get-howls a'trifle wider, or, r failing that-, get bis own stamned—if he can. T. Lock i.v.for a skip, rather too quiet, but; he is playirig as .well as. ever. Indeed., Jip- practically won tlie final against Hain for the big.nrizc, tis on four different occasions he had; a head of five, shots lying 'agaiiist lijni. On two', of t'lPMy lie broke up the head, and drove the jack out of bounds:-on one of them lie scored three shots by taking it to - the ditch;' while on one lie secured sccond shotnot- a : bad record. . .--"-i?' Carswpll's Taieri team .was. nowjjerc in Iho' section games.' but gained third prize in the ordinary Rink Match. .What po«-

, ■■ . ■... ... se&scd Carswell to take Tint as - when ho might have had Tom MackiO-IS-'"'•' bevond-comprehension. _ : vrSneddon's Knitunu. rink had hard luck • v-i: in the Championship ovent. • Thoy won four matches, losing the fifth to Lock after; ' a groat strugglo, by ono point, I think it -would hot be s' bad plan -to allow * into tho finals those first arid second places in-the seotions. •D. Macphcrson, seoond player, played a sterling, game in the match against look, but in somo of tho others—notably in the final against Hain— lie was nowhere. J- Sanders' led well throughout. 1\ Sanders is far too excitable, one would think, to be a successful howler,; 'arid yet his record gives, tho . i'« . .to thai impression. I am -sure, howeTer, .' that to him, as everyone else, tho poet's words hold good: Know ..prudent, cautious, ia : :: .wisdom's root. . Sneddon proved himself tho samo mo,. old general that wo are accustomed to, with ono. exception. ' It, does no mannor of good to «how displeasure over bad shots.-.' It cannot bo too strongly insisted that the: /•-. player' feels such tilings liioro tHan anyone else, and gibes only mako hiiir feci (leaperate, and play worse. '- 1 Hain had a strong rink representing , North-End. Tho lead, Wallace, gained for himself tho reputation of being'the best in tho >. tournament, and, indeed, it was thoroughly deserved. His play throughout was a treat to see, and-helped.largely to 7 the succcss of this particular rink.-. In the Championship Hatch against Dall (semi-final), when 15 heads had been played - slid.tho scoro was level, Hain called out, . " Now, Wallace, one on the jack wins the , game." On the jack came the bowl, and it , did win the game. James Allen played a consistently good game throughout. (In (he ordinary Rink Gamo Allen was replaced by a: yoiirig player—,T. A. Wcsney,—who shaped remarkably well.) M'liwrick was hardly the M'liwrick we. . . have been accustomed to, but at. times ho got tliero, in his old style. Ho may he , crodited with winning three games for his rink with his last bowl of the game. Against W. Smith, when Hain was ono down and ono end to go, Mac. took out two of his opponent's shots, and so settled that, match'; hagainst Payne ho trailed tho jack,' and lay alongside it—another win; and when -• • Dall was throp up with ono end to go, again lie cauie to the rescue with a lovely trail, scoring three for his side; -Hain drawing .the fourth that secured the win. "Verily, • M'liwrick has plenty of fight in'him ycc. Hain was in his best form, and got in some fine' shots. Altogether, in spite of the adverse, weather, conditions, the gathoring was most* successful. One important factor that wont a. long way to ensure this success was the indefatigable manner in which tho ladies looked after the wants of the bowlers. Front 10 o'clock in the morning right' on till half-past 5 tea and its accompaniments were dispensed, and in such a fashion that howlers wore made to feel that thoy were, conferring a favour by going in to get some. Truly, the Invercanriil Executive has much to thank tile ladies for. The 'smoke concert was a most sociable affair. From remarks made thereat it ■ seems'tolerably certain that the first attempt sit a big prize c-wnt will bo the last, so far as Invcrcargill is coneerned. In future. it is. anticipated' that there will bo only a Rink Match and a Pairs Match—tho forrher played in sections, the second on tho.' two-life system. «•-•'•. It just occurs to me that I have omittjd to mention a most unassuming quartet that won their way into the hearts of all the t • other players—the Caledonian team of colts. ' It. was ii very gallant fight that they — put up in the Kink Match against Sneddon >, towards the close of that competition, and in the Doubles f'allender and Scott negotiated, with conspicuous success, some very ' heavy metai before going niulor to Hain" and M'liwrick. Here is their record:' In ! the first round they beat Wakefield and ' Jeffrey (Lawrence), J?—6; in the next Mackie and Mackie.- Then they showed a clean pair of heels to T. Lock and Wilson, of Gore; next Reid and Smith (Kaituna).i ,went down before them in most hollow fashion: but in their succeeding game they 1 lost. However, they secured fourth prize ' and the: hearty good wishes of all who guv' 1 them ■ play.

Pt5. P'.S. . For Apust. Plvcl. Wn. Dm. Lost. G.T. G. T. Woles ..'3 3 0 0 4 7 0 2 Ireland - 3 2 .0 1 2 7 HI Scotland* ... S 3 0 2 2 2 3 4 England .. ?• 0 0 " 0 1 410

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SPOTTING AND SPORTS. Otago Daily Times, Issue 13274, 4 May 1905

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