Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

OTAGO SCHOOL OF MINES.

The following is the report of Professor James Park, Director of tho Otago University School of Mines, for the year 1902:—

The. Mining School for the session ending tho 31st October, 1905, showed tli9 satisfactory attendance of 32 registered students and on© casual student for one subjeot only —namely, practical assaying. The registered students' attended with the intention of going through one or moro of the courses prescribed in the calendar for the several divisions of the Echool. Of these seven entered for their first year, leaving 25 in their second or third year,.

Of students who entered for their final year t four completed their studies with slicccss, slid, having presented satisfactory ccrtifipatc3 of time spent in practical mining or metallurgical operations, as inquired by Regulation 9, were awarded the diplomas and certificates to which they were entitled, as follows;— John J,t'Kinlay—Certificate of Metallurgical Chemist and Assayer. George Edward D. Cotton—Diploma of Associate in Mining and Certificate of Metallurgical Chemist and Assayer.' John Porteous—Diploma of Associate in Mining and Certificate of Metallurgical Chemist and Assayer. John Henderson, B.Sc.—Diploma in Mining and Certificate of Metallurgical Chemist and Assayer. Diplomas and certificates wero issued during tho year to eight students who had' previously passed' the necessary class examinations, on the production of the necessary certificate relating to practical work, as follow:—

Norman E. Fisher—Diploma, of Associate in Mining. George 11. lioyse—Diploma of Associate in Metallurgy. William Shand Wait—Diploma of Associate 111 Metallurgy. Adam Hay—D : ploma of Associate in Metallurgy. William E. Barn n—Diploma of Associate in . Metallurgy. Basil ]?. Lusk—Diploma of Associato in Metallurgy. Ormsby Gore Adams—Diploma of Associate iii Metallurgy. George Scott Orbell—Diploma of Associate 111 Mining, Diploma of Associate in Metallurgy, Certificate of Metallurgical Chemist and Assayer, and Certificate of Land and Mine Surveyor. Annual Examinations.—Tlie attendance in tho differont classes and the results of the annual examination in the subjscfcs of instruction in the Mining School prescribed by the regulations for the differont courssß are shown in tho following tabulated statement : — Eesults.

nJ 3 I rg O • Subject of Examination, g ■" g 'jjj * 5 .tt S 2 '3 rfi fa to h General geology (senior) .. 5 12 2 — General geology (junior) .. 7 22 2 1 Mining geology 3 — \ 2,— Mineralogy 13 15 5 2 Petrography 8 4—22 Applied mEobanics .. .. 18 18 7 2 Land and mine surveying (senior) .. 8 5—3 — Land and mine surveying (junior) 10 4 6 — — Mining (senior) ...... 4 12 1 — Mining (junior) 8 1 G 1 — Metallurgy (first course) 10 3 8 22 Metallurgy (second course) a ~ 2 3 — Blowpipe analysis .... 9 3 6 1 — Assaying (first course) .. 9 1 7 1 — Assaying (second course) ~ 6 1 4 — —

The teachers of the subject? enumerated in the 'above tabic were aa follow: —Dr Marshall—Geology, mineralogy, ' petrography; Tho Director—Applied mechanics, mining, surveying, mining geology; Mr "Wafcrc— Metallurgy, assaying, blowpipe analysis. Students in their first or second year, according to their standing, attended the University classes in mathematics,'theoretical mechanics, theoretical physiqs, practical physics, theoretical and practical chemistry; and three students qualifying for tlio Diploma of Associate in Geology, for tho natural science. requirements of Bachelor of Science degree, and for honours in geology attended the in paleontology. The results of the'eliminations in tlieso subjects are as follows: — Results. I 3 5 <2 3 5 -a ° ■ Subject of Examination, "a -un H S '3 g 3 '5 <1 6| 111 B 6 Mathematics 8—134 Theoretical mechanics .. 3 — 2 4 3 Theoretical physics .. .. 10 — 2 G 2 Practical physics„ .. ]2 — 3 7 2 Theoretical chemistry .. G 3 2 1 — Practical chemistry .... 5 1 3 1 — Palroontology .. .. .. 4 I>l 1 1 The teachers in these different subjects were as follows:—Professor Gibbons—Mathematics. Professor Shand — Theoretical mechanics, theoretical physios, and practical physics.. Professor Black—Theoretical chemistry and practical chomistry. Professor Benham—Palffiontology. Students in tho different divisions, according to their standing, have to attend the drawing classes at the School of Art. Mr Hutton reported satisfactory progress in every case, "tho results of his examinations are given below:— ' Results. Attend- Ist 2nd Subject of Examination, ance. Class. Class, Machine construction and drawing 4 22 Solid geometry .... 22 — Practical geometry .... 4 3 1 Model drawing 4 22

Ulrich Medal.-This. medal is approprintely awarded-in each year to the best student in mineralogy and petrography. It was on on for competition for the first time in 1902, and was scoured by James Allan Thomson with'a first class in each subject. Now Zealand University Examination's.-. Five students presented themselves for examination in different sections of the BSc decree in mining am! metallurgical ongipeering; one student for honours in science, for senior scholarships, and three ior final examination in B.oc. Ihe results veto eminently satisfactory,and in sovcral directions established records which rendered tho. year ,1902 LmemoraWe m the history' of the Mining School. Of the five in the B.Sc. division, Norman B. Fidier succeedod iu passing the third and final examination, thereby . securing, the firs BSc dojrea'in mining engineering granted bv th» New Zealand University. Ho nsssed tho class subjects at the Mining some vears airo, having been a-stlideliC of tile-late director in mining;, of Dr Don m gefllngj-, and of Mr Begg in surveying. Mrlushar since then lias pursued ins studies with unremitting diligence, and must be congratulated on tho 'successful, attainment, of Ins object, David M. Tonilinson, following the footsteps of Mr Fisher, passed the second examination for 8.50,. m metallurgical engineering," William Gibson and, H. Koy Maedonald part of the first examination m mining engineering; and • JoJvn Henderson, B.Sc., certain subject: in metallurgical engineering. . . , . , The higlnsfc distinction aimed at by mining etildents in previous years was the diploma of aasociat-cship, but in the past three years there lias been a growing desire on the park of a few to qualify for the .higher degree of B.Sc. ill mining or metallurgical 'engineering, 'and- it is not improbable that ill coming years many will elect, to follow this courso. It is needless to say that the Now Zealand University requires a higher standard of attainment foi its B.Sc. degree than the Mining School for its dinloma of associatcehip. • John Henderson, B.Sc., also eat-for liC'iioui'S in scicn.cc, and was sucocGsful in gaining first clues 'honours in geology. This is tho wcond occasion on winch this distinction haa fallen to the University of Otago, and the first time it has teen secured by a student of the Mining School. Arthur I}. Andrew, in the University senior scholarship examination, secured the scholarship in physics, and J. Allan Thomson the'scholarship in geology. Tho senior scholarship in physical science lias now fallen to tha Otago University on oix different occasions, but this is tho first time it has k-en gained by a mining student. It is equally worthy of. mention (hat the scholarship in geology won by Mr Thomson is the only on{ that lias, so far, been secured by a student of Otago University. Thus, of four senior scholarships won by Otago University in 1902, two wore secured 'by students of the Mining School., Our geological students have especially distinguished themselves in the University examinations, and Dr Marshall, lecturer in geology, deserves much commendation for his enthusiasm and «irefu! instruction, With the good fortune to obtain students equally devoted to their' work, the same satisfactory results may bo looked for again in future years.

The cconomio value of. geological science in connection with mining has long been recognised in Germany and tho United States of America, where the highest poeta in (ho State Departments of Mining are filled by accomplished geologists. It in certain that if a mining engineer would rise to the higher branches of his profession ho must needs distinguish himself in the domain of geology. It may not bo , out of plaoe to mention hero that in addition to the results mentioned above, three mining students— Arthur li'. Andrew, J. Allan Thomson, and A. G'adsby John-ton—passed tho final examination for tho ordinary degree of B.Sc. of tho New Zealand University.

Government Examinations .under Mining; Acts.—Mr J. Otto Bishop, a lata graduate of tho school, passed the examination for a first elais mine iv.anager's certificate, which will lx> granted 011 completion of necessary practical work in a mine. The following old .students also passed tho examination for ■ battery suncrinfcndcnts' certincato?:— Goorjo S. Orbsll, W. K-rneet Barron.. Jolin Maekay, 6. A. C. Uhicli, and G. A, Gow. Laboratory.—Mr Waters reported on 51 samples of ore, mostly gold determinations, and treated two parcels of ore in the experimental plant. Th» gold, ores of'Otago are mostly clean. and free-milling, ivith tho result that the experimental plant- is seldom used hj' tho public. On tho other hand, a small leaching plant is urgently required for tlm practical demonstration of certain metallurgical processes, ar.d by modifying tho present battery on tho lines indicated by Mr Water.? euch a plafi't could be constructed' at a onst net oxcoednig £50. Donations.—The geological collections in tho sohool have' been supplemented 'by a large mimhrr of rooks and fossils presented by Dr Marshall, Mr Hamilton, and the Director; and during; tho year Messrs Smith and Co. (Limited), of Sheffield, forwarded useful exhibits of stool and steol-wire ropes. At present- Dr Marshal! is greatly hampered by the want of suitable space in which to set out and exhibit his collections. What- is much needed is a room in which tho characteristic rocks and fossils of tho different rock formations of New Zealand could bo exhibited in their chronological order for. purposes of class demonstfatiioii.

Old Students of Mining School.—Among tho more important positions scoured by old students Of the Mining School during 1902 were those of Mr A. Montgomcrie, M.A., appointed State mining engineer fcr Western Australia; Mr J l . B. Allen, M.A.. 8.50., director of Western Australia School of Mine?; Mr 0. G. Adams, A.0.5.M., director of .Tham&j School of Mines; Mr T. 0, Bishop, A.O.S.jM., director of Reef (on School of Mine*;. Mr W. S. Watt, A.0.5.M., director of Zeehan School of Mines; Mr Jame3 iifaclnrcn, B.Sc., speoial mining geologist to Indian Government; Mr Adam Hay, A.0.5.M,, assistant engineer to Abyssinia Prospecting Syndicate; and Mr Norman B, Fislrcr, B.Sc., M.E., assistant surveyor, Dunedin Drainnjc- Board. Beoidcs ((lose, many, of our passed students lia.vo obtained appointments during tho rear in mining :uid metallurgical works in Now Zealand and Australia. Conclusion.—l wish in conclusion to record my appreciation of tho Real and Ahillty with which Mr Wntere and Dr Mniphall conducted the work of their sovoral departmollis during tlio pfet year.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT19030509.2.7

Bibliographic details

OTAGO SCHOOL OF MINES., Otago Daily Times, Issue 12658, 9 May 1903

Word Count
1,743

OTAGO SCHOOL OF MINES. Otago Daily Times, Issue 12658, 9 May 1903

Working