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HALLENSTEIN BROS. & CO.

NEW ZEALAND , CLOTHING , factory. •:..;.■ Among the most representative oitlzens in Dunedin is Mr Bendix Hallenstein,; the highly respected German consul. Mr Hallenstein's interests are large, and personally Jl3 is that combination of geniality and shrewdness which is ever seen in the best types of the Teutonic character. A native of Germany, Mr Hallenstein came to the Australian colonies about 44 years ago, attracted by the Victorian goldfields. .At Diilesford ' he, with his brother, opened a general store, and conducted a successful business in that locality. He remained in. Victoria1 for a period of six years, and' in 1862 came to New Zealand, and for about 12 months was engaged in«h,iisiness'atv ! ln-' vercargill, after which he went to Queens-, town. With a population of 10,000 people to supply, he found a ready market for'his goods, and ' the storekeeping lousiness which he founded at \ Queenstown soon extended its arms into neighbouring centres. Branches >yere. opened at the •. Arrow, Crqmwell, and Lawrence.; In a very few years his commercial house had so grown that he was enabled to purchase a. large farm containing 1500 acres of the mostfertile soil,-and to build thereon a most beautiful residence^ His brothers were bent on pioneering the wholesale trade in Dunedin, and . his financial co-partnership was requested. This, from the seclusion of his country mansion, Mr Bendjx Hallenstein readily gave. But as he had himself predicted, the time was not yet ripe for the wholesale business, and he came to Dunedin in ]p'--with the object of recovering the money he had lost in the venture. It was not long before his keen1 commercial insight covered a way to renewed and increased prosperity. He became associated with Mr Anderson as a partner, and jifter going into matters with that gentleman, he ap: pointed him manager of the manufacturing branch at a liberal salary, whilst Mr Hallenstein independently opened a retail clothing and hosiery business in the Octagon. Tlie success which attended this venture can bs estimated when it is mentioned.that the business therein founded has 36 branches throughout New Zealand! Mr Hallenstein has, during his long residence in New Zealand, identified, himself actively with public affairs, and his judgment, discretion, and clear insight have been of value to the pioneers. During the rule of the provincial governments he was a member for about eight years of the Council. He was. also elected to the House of Representatives, representing Wakatipu.,. Some time ago, however, the then Consul-general in Australasia for Germany, Dr Kraul; called on Mr Hallenstein, and reiterated a previous request that he should accept the post of German Consul for Otago and Southland. Mr Hallenstein consented to take : this honourable post upon the death of Mr Houghton, the former consul, and thereupon relinquished all active participation in the affairs of the colony. Mr Hallenstein is a director of the National Insurance Company, of Kempthorne and Prosser's Drug Company, and of the Westport Coal Company. He'is also chairman of directors of the D.1.C., and holds directorships on the boards of many smaller compaifes. ' He was born near Hanover, Germany, in 1835.

The New Zealand Clothing Factory, carried on under the style of Hnllerjsteiri Bros: and Co., was originally opened-in 1873 in premises situated in Custom House square, on the site of the present National Insurance building. To that company the premises were subsequently sold, and Messrs Hallenstein Bros, and Co. opened on a larger scale in a' four-storeyed structure' in. bowling street. A feature about this fine building is the perfection of arrangements for the health and comfort of its occupants, nnd this is due largely to Mr B. Hallenstein, whose ideas in this respect were .incorporated in the plans of the architect. When visiting England some few years since the former went over the buildings of the largest manufacturers. He fpund that these structures were inferior rather than superior to his. own in hygienic precaution and provision, and he could not gain from his tour of inspection a single idea wherewith to improve, on the construction and arrangement of the Dowling street factory. When the Factories Aot came into operation, the inspector found that no alterations whatever -were necessary; in'the conduct, arrangement, or construction "■'. of Mr Hallenstein's establishment. Portion of the ground floor is occupied by Messrs Michaelis, Hnllenstein, and Farqiihar, tanners nnd leather merchants. The other floors and the rear part of the ground floor are utilised entirely as a factory by Mr Bendix Hallenstein." On the first floor..are the offices and warehouse, tlie latter being stocked' with manufactured goods, from which the retail branches are supplied. From the concrete ground floor, used asa packing and receiving department, a hydraulic elevator of immense power carries goods to the warehouse on the first floor. • The two upper floors, excellently lighted by means of skylights, are used for the real work of the factory, and here about 300 hands are constantly employed. There are 80 sewing machines, with a speed of . nearly 2000 stitches per minute, driven, by an Otto gas engine. There are also .five button-hole machines. The cutting department is on the topmost floor, separated from the hat and cap making branch, where the headgear necessities of railway officials, cricketers, etc., are catered for with unceasing industry and skill. The girls employed in the factory are well cared for, and a large dining-room is provided, where they sire enabled to partake of their meals with regularity, and' comfort. A special waterproof department of factory: occupies an adjacent brick building, which is also fitted up with every convenience conduciye to health and comfort. Among the specialities which Messrs Hallenstein ■ Bros, and Co. have studied is that of "military dress, accessories to which, such as dress belts, presentation swords, etc., they import, themselves manufacturing the various uniforms for which there is demand. : The output of the factory is estimated at nearly 3000 garments per week. The retail branch in Dunedin, managed by Mr Alexander Crow, is conducted in a two-storey , bi'ick building situated at the corner of the Octagon and Princes street, having a frontage of about 28ft to the latter thoroughfare, divided into two windows by an open hallway measuring ,13ft by Bft. This hallway constitutes thn main entrancs to the shop, and is floored with eoloureel slates, and an immense india-rubber, mat bearing the firm's name. This entrance, with the two front windows, is lighted, by three very powerful patent lights, which have been specially imparted for.the purpose. The frontage to the Qctajjpn .qbcupies 44ft, and a window 9ft in width has benn placed here only recently In the interior of the shop the'ground floor is divided into three departments as follows: Men's mercery, containing hats, shirts, ties; niens ready-made clothing, and boys' nnd youths' ready-made clothing. Proceeding to the top flat by an iron screw staircase, the tailoring department is reached. Hern highclass bespoke wnrk is done independent. of the factory. .Adjoining this department is the workroom for the tailnrs. which i« t- tillighted and ventilated. Mr Bendix Hallenstein's ability in comm pr<ual and political life and urbanity in social circles perrnar\ entlv incorporate his name in the Minn)?, of Außtrnlas'fn progress. Mr H. E. Hart, nne of Mr Hiillenstpin's partners, is ' the. financial manager, He is a native of Victoria, and was educated at Scot's Coljege. Melbourne. In that city lie was associated with W. J. Greig and Co., commercial brokers. Twenty-four years ago he cams to Dunedin, and has been connected with Hallenstein Bros, and Co. ever since. .Mr AY. Fels and Mr E. Hallenstein, son-in-law and naphew respective^ of Mr B. Hallenstein, also take an actiye part~in. the business, being the. junior, partners who. with Mv Hart how'have "the principal majK agement of the concern. - ';' ;

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HALLENSTEIN BROS. & CO., Otago Daily Times, Issue 11626, 9 January 1900, Supplement

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HALLENSTEIN BROS. & CO. Otago Daily Times, Issue 11626, 9 January 1900, Supplement

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