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THE OTOGO DAILY TIMES

SATURDAY, FJCSBUABY 16, 1895.

The question of bimetallism has lately! had a good chance of being judged on its merits in Dunedin. The communications of various members of the Bimetallic League, and the lengthy addresses of Mr Mbllajtd and of Mr G. T. Booth and Mr J. P. Geo'ssmajj-, of Christchureh, have laid the case in all its general bearings pretty fully before the public. Believing that the claims of the bimetallists at least deserv.e careful attention, we have given them and their opponents a fair field, and the conclusion that we have reached'has been already indicated in our leading columns. In our issue of January 19 we declared our conviction that the "ruinousappreciation of gold " is at the bottom of our commercial depression, and that itcauses a constant increase in the amount of colonial public and private debts. We have printed several warnings and rejoinders from various supporters of the present state of things. But we cannot admit that any of them have met the arguments of the bimetallists fairly or fully. The general tendency is to suggest that low prices and hard times are necessary results of the extension of the modern industrial system. This is a very gloomy view of things to take ; and tall all reasonable expedients have been tried to avert such a calamity, we must be pardoned for refusing to adopt a theory which makes modern civilisation of necessity end in general destitution and misery . a:ad anarchy. Bimetallism, we think, presents the appearance of being based upon a firm foundation. For this reason we have investigated the subject, and we do not think that anyone who follows our

example will be disappointed. We do not admit that, as ono of our correspondents Itindly suggests, we write in ignorance; nor will we plead guilty to the charge of cruelty and wickedness because he and his friends imagine that we are trying to delude the public with false hopes. As far as we lenow them, bimetallists do not claim that their proposed reform will right every wrong and cure every disease.. It is not a financial St. Jacobs Oil or an economic Sapolio ; and the mere names of the statesmen and political economists of all nations who have declared for bimetallism might at least encourage its opponents to believe that they are not justified in throwing it on ono side as unworthy of serious consideration. A little careful thought might Have prevented one of our contemporaries from implying, •with a simplicity that would be charming if it were not absurd, that we had invented bimetallism for the purpose of interfering with the prospects of the Colonial Treasurer's English mission. Mr Waed himself has, -we observe, recommended the public tostudy and examine the question of bimetallism; and we believe that if Mr "Ward, who has so far refused to commit himself, will, with those who take his advice, consider the subject on its merits, bimetallism will soon, as far as Imperial matters can, come within the scope of practical politics in New Zealand. For, on a question that vitally affects colonial interests, it is difficult to imagine the English authorities long resisting a vigorous expression of colonial opinion.

A few words with reference to the latest contribution to our bimetallic literature—the address delivered byMr Geossmauy which we recently . printed in full. We will refer briefly to a few features of the great currency question upon which the lecturer dwelt., The. whole bimetallic theory was shown to depend upon the quantitative theory of prices,: and this no moriometallists have yet been able to disprove—in fact, most of them admit it freely. Further, it was shown that silver could be used as money at a fixed ratio with gold, because, historically, this has been done, and that thus the world's specie could be in a moment doubled in amount. Prices would therefore rise. And the lecturer dilated with justice on the evils of falling prices, and the advantage to all classes in high and rising prices. The case thus far is very simple. If bimetallism can do that much for us—if it can increase the rewards of capital and labour and can lead to an expansion of our industries,—no doubt all classes would willingly promote it. And until it is finally disproved, we repeat that it demands, on these grounds, serious private and public attention. But when it is further claimed that by steadying the exchanges an .added silver currency would put us on the same 'level as our ■, wheat -growing and wool - raising:, rivals in silver-' "using lands, and further, that1 the constant increase of our gold debts would be cheeked, in this case we say nothing but the fullest and clearest exposure of the fallacies supposed to be inherent in a scheme supported by so great show of authority would justify us in setting it carelessly aside. And we conceive that we will be neglecting the heavy responsibility to the public interests that rightly; falls--upon the public press if we refrain from giving; this important matter the best opportunity for 'discussion and exposition within our power. ' We therefore intend to return at an early date to a detailed examination of bimetallism as a reform to, be urged upon the Legislature and the Ministers of the Crown, and as of paramount importance to every class and section of the people.

In this connection we may refer briefly to letters signed by Mr Lbh Smith, ■which appeared in recent ißsues of this journal. We do not intend to open the'main controversy here and now, but Mr Lbh- Smith's mistaken earnestness makes him a conspicuous supporter of the existing system; and we do not wish to avoid the responsibility of criticism. Mr Lee Smith's chief idea seems to be that what is wrong with the country is the so-called " balance of trade "; and so he declares that the excess of our imports over our exports will be naturally corrected by our creditors as' soon as they regard our position as unsound. Our credit, he says, will be limited, arid so our imports, as compared with exports, will fall. Now, we wish to remind Mr Lbb Smith that the present difficulty of this country is thftt our'creditors have insisted on making our credit too large. They assert that we owe them from 30 to 40 per cent, more gold than we have ever had from them. That is what the appreciation of gold really comes to in our case. And what is worse, they are adding an unborrowed increment to our debt every year. While gold continues to rise our creditorg are so far from limiting our credit that they compel us to subscribe to an admission of debts which we have never contracted. On Mr Lee Smith's own reasoning, therefore, there is no prospect of a proper adjustment of the " balance of trade " in what he regards as the normal way. Thus, Mr Lee Smith's argument has no bearing upon the growth of our debt caused not by fresh borrowing but by the automatic appreciation of gold. Mr Smith endeavours to show by a rather cumbersome array of figures that Great Britain consumes far more per head now than in the days of high prices. ' This is true enough, and so is his contention that meat and even luxuries have found their way even into the poorest homes. But to what does this point? To a fact constantly emphasised by bimetallists—that wages, largely through the power of the trades unions, have not fallen in the same proportion as prices. So far the wageearner has had the best of our commercial experiences. But wages must come down, if the present conditions hold; and the industrial history of Europe and America, with their strikes and riots and anarchism for the last few years, has been full of omens of this danger. And even the wage-earner has net really gained by his comparatively high wages. Irregular employment has produced a shiftless, thriftless habit of life; and this tendency to improvidence, resulting in reckless marriage and a great increase in the destitute class, is mistranslated by Mr Smith into a sign of prosperity, because population has increased ! And as for the producers, Mr Smith's argument that we ought to be satisfied with the increased sale of wool and wheat at starvation rates reminds us forcibly of the well-worn story of the Irish innkeeper who lost on every glass

of whisky, but made it up on the quantity he sold. However, we must reserve further consideration ofc' the arguments of Mr Lee Smith and other critics for the present.

Onk cannot read the Hon. W. P. Rheves's exhaustive summary of the recent legislation without admitting, that this country is well nigh perfect in this respeot— no perfect that a little more will ba enough, and a little more again more than enough. The "Ship of State " is a favourite metaphor. This ship was found to be too slow a tub, so everybody on board suggested a remedy, and all were adopted. More masts were put in and more Bails rigged tip; moro paint was put on; more masters, more mates, and more pilots; the salaries were increased and the pay was increased, and the hours reduced ; the middies were sent back to school and the ship boys ware replaced by A.B.s at full wages. At lasb the ship was well nigh perfect and she went to sea, but she forgot her ballaßt and forgot her cargo, and she is sailing on those terms now. Plenty of masters and plenty of mcD, but whether they will be success!ul'in sailing the newlyfound craft depends on the next breeze. We are afraid that the breeze is coming. It is Baid that in Russia you cannot speak or even breathe, still less pass a day, without the risk of offending against some forgotten ukase. It is difficult now in New Zealand to hold one's head erect without knocking it against some part of the all-too-perfect machinery with which we are governed.

We do not think that we were far wrong in predicting that the treaty of Adelaide would be ill received by the people of Victoria and New South Wales. We can only judge by tho ntterances of the few who have, spoken and written on' the subject, but so far we may assume that they represent the general opinion o£ those colonies. To pass the treaty in its present form would be a death blow to treaty making in the futnre, and would be a heavy blow at Intercolonial EYeatrade. Wo give credit to Mr Waed for , good intentions, but either he has -a very limited view of colonial commerce and a very erroneous view of Victotian politics, or he has allowed himself to be hoodwinked. This is a matter greatly to be regretted, as even if 'our Parliament now irajsctß the treaty the incident will' have done some. harm. We do not think that any adverse criticism could have done more than lea^d to a better knowledge of the subject llad the clauso bsen oitxitted forbidding either colony to enter into a treaty with others. Ifc is this that has apparently provoked hostility. But in the long run New Zealand will be the greatest sufferer by this, Had this clause been omitted we believe that^ the treaty would have given a positive stimulus to arrangements of the kind.

At the moment when, in common with our Australian neighbours, we are anxious for extended markets for frozen meat, it is unpleasant to read that the Germans have prohibited the import of frozen meat, especially Australian mutton. Of course Australian mutton includes New Zealand mutton. This shots up an unexplored market which might have led to something. We cannot, of course, complain of the decision. All the Australasian "colonies are more or less Protectionist, and here they have the advantage of an object lesson giving them a near view of the' true meaning of Protection. It is almost fortunate that we found the door shut; so to speak, before it was opened. Had a large trade sprang np,* the result of disturbing it would have been serious. We are reminded that this Is not the first occurrence of tho kind. ' A few yearn ago the Germans treated American pork in the same way, making the pretence that it was not subjected to the same rigorous sanitary inspection as their own. The. Americans, however, though fond of Protection at home, will not stand it abroad.' They give their President despotic powers in such a case, which thafcitmctionary exercised on that occasion by inarming Germany that it must either pass the pigs or give up trading with tha- United States. We, however, cannot retaliate1 in this or any other way. . .. ":''!:.'.'- I''-."." '■ '■' " '

As the old landmarks* are passing away it is sometimes interesting-.to note the changes which -tuoy liavd v>eau. <. tfur many j^ l ,rs l rliej saw nothing but progress; in recent times there has; still,,,.beea^ progress,, bnt of a different kind, This week the death of Mr Valentine1 Smith in the North Islandiis recibrded. He had little to do with the history of New Zealand, but he had); an interesting personal history. In 1848 or 1850, under the advice of Mr Ohables Endebby, a colony was founded at the Auckland Islands. It consisted of abont 100 white people, who fotmd there about the same number of Maoris. Mr Endebby was manager of the company which undertook the colonisation, and held a commission as Lieutenant-governor from the Queen. Mr Valentine Smith was his secretary; Colonial Secretary, in faci r to the smallest and most unsuccessful of British colonies. The idea was whaling and agriculture to aid whaling ships. The whaling came to nothing; the ships cruised abont but got no whales, and that branch of the enterprise failed. The cultivation never was anything but the most utter failure. Nothing grew in the pitiless climate and hungry soil of the island; the very animals died of starvation on the natural herbage. The amiable old gentleman who had started the scheme was deprived of his appointment as manager. When gold was found in Australia most of the inhabitants rushed thither; the few who were left came to New Z9aland. Mr Kndeeby, still Governor without a people, went to England, and the barren islands were first forfeited to the Crown 'and then annexed to New Zealand. A few< of the inhabitants still surWve in this 'country.

Another man, some of the incidents of whose life add a picturesque chapter to Australasian history, was Csptain Joyce, who' until quite recently might be Been diligently wbrkiDg his little voasel up to our wharves. Forty years save one month have passed since the barbarous murder of Mr John Pkick, who was battered to a jelly by the stones o£ a mob of the vilest convicts in the hulks at Williamstown. Among these on the spot was Sergeant Joyce, of the once famous water police, a man of small stature but of unflinching courage. Another who was present and distinguished himself by his bravery was Mr Caldwell, our late gaoler. Mr Price, the luspeotor-gcneral, was a man of a very severe type, but few now living have an idea of the class of ruffian he had to deal with. He has had many detractors, and they have managed rightly or wrongly to give him a bad na,me; but as among them must be counted Buegess and Gabhett, both of whom left " memoirs," it is a pity that his reputation should suffer from such criticism. Mr Joyce lived and moved in the days of the Nelson robbery, So absolutely was the secret of that affair kept and so absolutely inviolate has it remained that it has been the occaeional theme of romancers. We think it is in Pakjeok's " Grif v that the tale is told of how the gang landed fifty thousand ounces of gold on: the beach, and ladled it oat in pannikins when dividing it. In those days it was not very difficult to get rid of gold. The gang might go up-country and pretend to return with it; now it is by no means easy, ;

The almost total destruction of the Chinese floet by that of Japan is truly a terrible object lesson: We have never quite lost faith in the Chinese, but we cannot now hope to see them recover and stand up in the present war. After all, their defeat ia as yet no worse than that of France in 1870. Then the French were defeated in all but one out of more than 50 pitched battle 3, thsir three standing armies were captured, and one of their four reserve armies shared the same fate, and another was forced to lay down its arms in a neutral country, until France was reduced to a condition little better than that in which she had found herself in 1814 and 1815, when she lay at tbe foefc of her conquerors. France, thus defeated ia 1870, is an active and aggressive military State in 1895, and has been so for many years. China still possesses three or four hundred millions of people—ten times as many as Japan—and plenty of unassailable territory, and if she has lost her ironclads she has at least learned that to keep them ia the future she must be more like her enemies and less like herself. Tbe great fear in her case is that she may become a prey to internal dissension; but give her a few years' peace and we may well expect to see her a respected Power again. One thing is clear —viz., that though her soldiers are so demoralised that they break and run from the victorious Japs, there is undoubted evidence of great personal bravery in both army and navy. This quality saved France, and may gave China.

It is believed that the safety of the Onion S.S. Company's Rotokino in tho recent terrible gale was due to the water ballast tanks being connected with the hold, ho that the water tha^ was practically einUiug the ship could bs let into tbe tanks and bo pumped out at tho rate of 100 tons per hour. By this means no less than 2000 tons of water were pumped out of the vessel, jAU worked with life-lineß lashed lo e&oh other, as each took his turn, from tho ciptain to the cabin boy, to cover tbe gaping hatchways against the high greeu suns. What can resiiit a sea whfin it strikes vertically (says the Sydney Morning Herald) is left unanswered as far as the Eotokino's fore and after hatchways are brought 8.8 witnesses. The massive fore-and-af ters that support the hatches gave way like gingerbread. A rough estimate i» that a pressure of 40 tons falling from a height of 40ft could only have Accomplished the wreck of these parts of the ship.

At the Harbour Board meeting on Thursday it wai stilted, in reference to pilots leaving vessels, before being passed by the health officer, that the health officer had sent word for the Anglian to go to Dunedin without being inspected, or otherwise olie would have lost the tide. So far as wo are aware, it is not necessary for the health officer to board and inspect the crew and passengers of intercolonial steamers.

The following transactions in land have taken place at the Land Office during the week: Section 45, block XI, Pomshoka Downs estate, containing 169 a3t sp, selected by Willintn Scarlett on lease in perpetuity at a capital value of £3 10s pot acre; section 2, block VII, and (section 3, block VIII, Nenfchora district, containing 4519 acres, selected by Charles Freeman as a small grazing ran at an annual rental of 7d per acre.

Tho introduction of tho New Zealand lettercard appears to be very popular. That is, at any rate, the experience of the officials in the Dunedin Post Office, where, bo far, the demand for the letter-cards has been, more than the supply could meet. The annual meeting of the Otsgo Fire Underwriters' Association was held on Thursday, when the following officers for the ensuing year were; elected:—Chairman, Mr R. B. D'Oyiy (Commercial Union) ; committee Messrs J. Edgar (New ZaalandJ, J. W. Briridley (Victoria),. W. Hislori (Norwich Union), and T. Chalm'er (Liverpool and London and Globe),

At the Port Chalmers Police Court yesterday, before Messrs E; G. Allen and J. R. Monson, J.P's., Mary Dow was charged with assaulting Mary Cuple on tho BtU inst. Mr Platts, who appeared for complainant, stated that while his client was talking to a Mrs Clark, one of her neighbours, defendant without warning threw a stone at1 her, striking her on the side of the face. Evidence having been given by Christina Clark and Constable Treacy, defendant entered the box and denied having struck complainant or having used indecent language. The Bench decided that an assault had been committed, but as accused had left the neighbourhood they did not think it necessary to bind her over to keep the peace. She would ba fined ba and 9s costs, in default 24- hours' imprisonment.

Mr A. Grant (late traffic manager) and family left for Auckland by the Monowai on Thursday, being accompanied to Port Chalmers by a large gathering of personal friends. Before leaving Dunedin Mr Grant was presented at the Goods department with the address, the text of which has already been givea in our report of his valedictory social, which has been beautifully illuminated by Mr Baker, of Bsttray street. Mrs Grant was also the recipient of a valnable lady's travelling bag, which Mr Grant suitably acknowledged on behalf of Mrs Grant.

. The Citizens' Band, under the conductorship of Signbr R. Squarise,:intend giving fortnightly open-air peri'oiniMices. The first of these place takes at the Octagon on Tuesday evening. '

There ia en exhibition in Messrs Howden and Monerieff's window in Princes street some specimens of very choice fruit grown in tho Vincent County, brought from their local Horticultural Society's shew, held recently at Alexandra South. The exhibit includes peaches (cling stone) and apricots, which, we are informed, would command'shillings ia; London for the pence they realise locally, i, Amongst the plums are. recognised Magnum Bonum, Diamond; Pond's Seedling, and Jefferson's Gage —all handsome fruits of their kind. The- apples are of immense size, particularly a seedling variety and Gloria Mundi. Pigg, filbert?, walnuts, ke. go to complete the exhibit—all excellent specimens, and tending to show the necessity for urgiug on the Otago Central rail" way to that centre. Mr Howden informs us that the prize fruits were in their prime for exhibition, but too ripe for packing for transit by the long road before reaching the railway at at Lawrence. The specimens exhibited are those which were awarded second honours and specially commended.

Mr Faulin at 11 o'clock last night predicted ligbt to moderate S.E. to N.B. winds,; fine with heat. . : ■ .

'■ The widow' and sons of the late Captain Joyce have received a number of telegrams and letters from all parts of the colony condoling with them on their bereavement. Among them is one from the Hon. Mr Seddon, addressed to Mr J. Joyce, M.H.R., as follows :— "Regret sad bereavement that has overtaken you in the death of your revered and worthy father. Accept my sincere and heartfelt sympathy."

The Oamarn Mail reports that Mr Williams, of Waitiki North, lost over 200 sacks of oats, which were uninsured, and about 20 acres of good pasturage by a grass tiro. The oats were in sacks in a grass paddock. It was only by hard work that the homestead was saved. By ploughing the ground the fire was kept from spreading to a stubble paddock in which there were several hundred sack.) of wheat.

At St. Joseph's Cathedral y.esterday a solemn office for the dead and High Mass of Requiem was celebrated for the repoce of the soul of the late Dr Kirby, Archbishop of Ephesus, who died at the age of 94 on January 22, at the Irish College in Rome, of which he was for many years president. The Very Rev. Father Lynch was celebrant of the mass, Fathers Hunt and Newport deacon and aub-deaeon, and Father Murphy master of the ceremonies. The bishop, attended by the Rev. Father Howard, was preocut in the sanctuary. The music was beautifully rendered by the choir of the Dominican nuns, among whom is a niece of the deceased prelate. Dr Kirby was an old and intimate friend of Bishop Wdran.

Much has lately been said in England about the fall in the price of wheat, but the facts have seldom been put in & more striking light than in the official returns issued by the Board of Agriculture. That board receives weekly reports from about 200 towns, the principal market centres of England and Wales, and has now made them up for last year, so that quantities sold and prices may be compared with those for preceding yeara. Five years ago, for instance (1890), the sales of British wheat in these towns reached nearly three and a-half million quarters. Last year the sales dropped to a little under two million quarters. In other words, the quantity of British wheat sold last year in some 200 of the chief corn market towns was less than three-fifths of the quantity sold in 1890. The fall in the average price as compared with that obtained five years ago is 31s lid the quarter to 22s lOd, a fall of nearly a third. Barley and oats declined at the same time both in quantity sold and average price, but to nothing like the same extent as wheat.

At the half-yearly meeting of the Engineers' Band, held in their new practice room in the Colonial Mutual buildings, tho following officers were elected for the next six months:— Bandmaster, Sergeant Jackson; secretary, C. Dickinson; assistant secretary, J. Oaborne; librarian, D. Boyd; custodian, G. Croxford; oommittee—Messrs Painton, Boyd, Parker, Madden, and Croxford. The report and balance sheet proved the band to be steadily progressing in every respect.

During last session of Parliament a return was ordered showing the number of extra or temporary clerks employed in each department of the Government during the financial years 1887-88, 1890-91, and 1893-9*. The following are the totals: 1887-88, 181; 1890-91, 168; 189394-, 241. The number of cadets appointed was as follows; 1887-88, 39; 1890-91, 169; 1893-94-, 132.

The Presbyterian Y.P.S.C.E., Port Chalmers, held a social on Tuesday evening to bid farewell to their president, tho Rev. H. Adamsou, who is retiring on account of ill-health. During tho evening sacred songj, readings, and recitations were rendered, and light refreshments partaken of. Hiss Faton, on behalf of the society, presented Mr Adamson with a silver inkstand, suitably inscribed, as a small token of the respect and esteem in which he is held by ths members. Mr Adamson very feelingly responded, and, after prayer, the meeting was brought to a close by singing "God be with you."

Ib may interest those who have dealings with banks (saya the Hawke's Bay Herald) to know that any conGdential written commnnic&tion which may pass between the manager acd themselves may be'produced in court;. As a matter .of fact they are not privileged, as many suppose. A case in point cropped up at Palmcrston when Mr J. G. Scott, manager of the Bank of New Zealand, appeared on snmmons to produce a document handed lo him in August last by Mr A. Lturenson, showing the position of the letter's affairs. Before giving evidence Mr Scott said the document . was given to him in confidence! and he wanted to know if he could be compelled to produce it. Mi- Hankies contended that no privilege existed. His Honor upheld Mr Hankina'e contention, stating that newspaper editors, doctors, or bank managers had no right to divulge to outsiders what vas told in confidence, but when these matter" came before courts of law no such privilege was allowed: Mr Scott having produced a document under compulsion, neither he nor the bank could be held responsible for co doing. Tho document waa then handed to the court by Mr Scott.

A remarkable series oE circumstances recently gave the Independent Order of Oddfellows of Viotoria an interest in tho Matibele campaign. At the last meeriDg of the Standing Committee of the order it was reported that an enterprising brother of the order left Victoria for South Africa, daring his absence his mother paying bis contributions to tha society without his knowledge. As tempting offers were made by the Chartered Company of a farm and a share in the Bpoil to those who might1 take service to depose Lobengula, .King of Mataheleland, he availed himself of the offer, was wounded, and for some\,time was in the hospital. Returning to Victoria he found he was "good"1 on the books of his lodge, and made a claim for sick pay for the whole time he was in hospital in Africa. The eomraittea held that as the brother was not enrolled in her Majesty's army, but was upon a raiding expedition, he wasnofc entitled to sick pay. In other words, though " good " on the boobs he was not good enough.

A strange phenomenon occurred at Wairoa the other day between 3 and 4 o'clock ia the afternoon, when a loud explosion, resembling a violent clap of thundsr, wass heard, the unusual disturbanca apparently issuing from the bowels of the earth. In certain localities the effect was very marked, and the sbeep became terrorstricken, running wild hither and thither. Many people in town observed the remarkable occurrence, but so far as wo are aware no one hag been able to explain its origin.

It has b°en finally settled, according to the latest intelligence from Cairo, that the marriage of the Khedive with the Lady Ikbal Hanum is to take place immediately at Cairo. It is stated, on the moot trustworthy authority (says the Westminster Gazette), that his Highness is greatly attached to his fiancee, who is a. Circassian by birth and 2i years of ago. Besides Turkish she knows no language excepting a little Arabic. At the express desire of the Khedive, the future Princess will always take up her residence with his Highness, and accompany him on his journeys—a great difference, from, the usual custom prevalent among the harem —but her Highness the -Khedive's mother will continue to preside at publio receptions for ladies, at which his future wife* will not attend.

The Tanrang:a correspondent of the New Zealand Herald writes:—" There are numerous reports about the richness of tHese mysterious Uriweri gold reefs, bnt the most authentic o£ the lot ia that the late Mr Troutbeck, of Galatea, got out three parcels and had them tested, the assays going from 6£oz to Boz to tao. ton. It is bslievedthat the Natives will: 'even now not disclose the richest part of the reefs." ' ■ "' :"'■ .-.■•' N *■':' ' .■"■■•• :-

The numerous- friends of Miss Eose Blanay will be (pleased to learn that she will giva a concert on Tuesday, February 26. Our leading musicians, with Mr A. j> Barfch as musical director, will assist; and Miss Fisher, the popular Wellington contralto, is coming specially for the concert. As Miss Blaney'* engagemeets necessitate her leaving for Melbourne early naxt month, this will be the only opportunity the public will have of hearing her.,

■ The Port Chalmers Rowing Club's fair will be e-opened to-night, and for the occasion a good musical programme has been arranged. ;

At tha City Hall this evening the Kennedy' Company will produce a drama entitled "The Streets of London," founded on the wellknown novel" Hard Cash."

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THE OTOGO DAILY TIMES, Otago Daily Times, Issue 10285, 16 February 1895

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5,281

THE OTOGO DAILY TIMES Otago Daily Times, Issue 10285, 16 February 1895

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