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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

The general election wa3 held throughout the colony on the 28th November, the day on which our last summary was published, and is notable as being the first in which the women of the colony have been allowed to exercise the franchise. There were keen contests in all but_ three electorates, and the result was a decided victory for the Government. The polling was very heavy, and the returns show that women availed themselves very largely of their newly acquired privilege. The utmost good order prevailed, and no single instance is reported of women being subjected to the slightest annoyance in recording their voces. Everywhere they were treated with the utmost respect.

The noteworthy features of the election of three members for the City of Dunedin wero the orderliness of the proceedings and tho heavy voting of female electors. The candidates were eight in number, of whom Messrs ( Pinkerton, Hutchison, and Barn_haw stood in tbe Ministerial-Labour interest, Mr Gourley also deola.ed himself s_ a Ministerialist, and Messrs Piah, Hayn__7* Gore, and Nicol stood as Independent candidates. The issue: was complicated, however, by the temperance question, in respect to which Messrs Pinkerton, Hutchison, and Earnshaw were pledged to support the direct veto, while Messrs Pish, Gourley, and Gore were bracketed on the Licensed Victuallers' ticket. A number of vehicles were engaged — the majority of them, apparently, in the interests of Messrs Fish and Gourley—in bringing to the poll the aged and infirm and those who consider it their privilege to be driven about at some other person's expense on an election day ; and there were knots of.touts in.front of the principal polling places. The women's committee of the Ministerial-Labour candidates were particularly energetic in looking after the female voters as they came to tho poll.. There was an entiro ! absence of election squibs, and the proceedings were conducted, on the; whole, in a good-natured manner, especially considering the fact that there _ were largo numbers of persons about Dowling street until the heavy but welcome downfall of rain between 4- and 5 o'clock drove to shelter those who were only attracted to the scene by idle curiosity. Prom the hour at which the poll closed, however, the weather having then cleared up, those interested in the election began, to flock in the direction of the principal polling booth, where the declaration of the poll was expected to be given about halfpast 9, by which time) to a person looking out from the windows' of the Garrison HaU, the spectacle was presented of a perfect sea of faces—a closely, packed mass of persons occupying the space in front of the Daily Times office, where complete arrangements had been made for displaying the results as they came to" hand by means of the electric light and lanterns; When the result showing that the MinisterialLabour trio of candidates had been elected for Dunedin was first made known through the numbers being exhibited on the Daily Times' screen there was tremendous cheering—which was continued for several minutes—from the vast and interested throng of pGopie assembled to learn how their respective candidates "fared. The following is the official result of-the polling:—:

D. Pinkerton ... ... ... 6771. W. Earnshaw . ... ... ... 6066 W. Hutchison _ .;, 5771 H.S. Fish... ........ ... 5*77 H. Gourley ... ... ... 4081 J. Gore ■.'•' ...'-■ ... 3728'

C. Haynes ... - ... ... 2283 D. Nicol ... ... 407 Informal ...7 ...7 ... 174 The contest at Waihemo between the Hon. J. M'Kenzie (Minister for Lands) and Mr M.J. Scobie Mackenzie (the •'-- orator of the Opposition") was watched with general interest throughout the colony. The Minister was successful, defeating his opponent by a majority of

For the Chalmers seat Mr John A. Millar, secretary of the Seamen's Union, defeated Mr B. Gt. Allen, who also stood in the Ministerial interest, by 1754 to 1635.7

For Waikouaiti Mr James Green (Independent) defeated the rival Ministerial candidates and a direct vetoist. The numbers were * J. Green, 1020; G. J. Bruce, 538; A. Thomson,' 514; T.Smith, 82. V ' " . y '

At Oamaru Mr T. Duncan, the late member, was re-elected, the polling being : T. Duncan, 1608 ;P. B. Fraser, 1192; D. Dunn, 252; W. H. Firth, 50.

Mr W. J. Steward, the old member and Speaker in fche last Parliament, had a majority of more than 1000 over Mr T. Patterson for Waikato.

In Caversham, Mr Arthur Morrison, the Labour candidate, defeated Mr W. Barron, an ex-member, by a majority of 136. Mr J. C. Buckland, in the Opposition interest, ran Mr W. Carncross, the old member, very close for tho Taieri, the voting being*. Camcross, 1402; Bucklaud, 1328. ;- For Bruce Mr James Allen was allowed to have a walk over. 7,

For Tuapeka the veteran politician, Mr Vincent Pyke, had opposed to him. three political tyros., Mr Pyke's majority was 341. Mr C. C. Rawlins polled 886 votes, Mr A. Fraser 580, and Mr F. M. Byrne 172. ':•--. Mr Thomas Mackenzie, the old member, was elected for Clutha by a majority of 832, his opponent, Mr J. Brugh, polling better than was expected. • . *\ ~. .. . ■. .-. The Opposition sustained a severe loss in the Mataura contest, the Hon. G.-F. Richardson, the late Minister for Lands, being defeated by Mr R- M'Nab by a majority of 117. Mr M'Nab polled 1417 votes; Mr Richardson, 1300; and Mr J. Christie, 371. **'•..■.;,

For the Wakatipu seat, Mi* Wm. Fraser defeated the Hon. W.. J. M. L'arnacb, late Minister for Mines, and Mr O'ftleara. The voting was as follows:—Fraser, 1191; O'Meara, 866; Larnach, 831.

Afc Invercargill, Mr J. W. Kelly,-the old Labour member/defeated Mrs J. Hatch, an exrepresenfcative, by 2422 to 1181., -, The old member, was also successful for Wallace, Mr J. Mackintosh polling 1509 votes to 1152 cast for Mr H. Hirst, the Opposition candidate.

The results in the other parts of the colony require but a.brief reference here. .Sir George Grey headed the poll at Auckland without his taking any steps to secure his return. The Hon.-E. Mitchelson was.re-elected for Eden, and the Hon. A. J. Cadman captured the Waikato seat. The Government scored a notable success7at Napier, and.also nearly defeated Captain. Russell for Hawke's Bay. Sir Robert Stout headed the poll for Wellington, Mr H. D. Bell, a son of the late; Agentgeneral, coming next, and Mr J. Duthie, one of the old members/being.third. Tho Hon. W. P. Reeves, Minister for Labour, headed the poll at Christchurch, and next to him came Mr G. J. Smith, a prohibitionist, with Mr W. W. Collins, an anti-prohibitionist, as third member! For the Ellesmere seat the Hon. W. Rolleston, leader of. the Opposition, was defeated by Mr W. H. Montgomery, a son .of an old representative of the district, who is & member of the Executive without portfolio. Mr Montgomery: secured 1579 votes to Mr Rolleston's 1284. : THE NEwTpaBLIAMENT. f The following is a complete list of the European members elected to the new. Parliament," classified as (M) Ministerialists, (0) Opposition, and (I) Independent :— Bay of Islands ... ... *R. M.Houston M Marsden ... *R. Thompson ... M Waitemata ... ... ... iR. Monk... ... 0 gaen ... ... *K. Mitchelson ... 0 City of Auckland... ... ■• Sir Gt. Grey ... I ■ • .. W. Crowther ... O .„ » „ »• .— —tC. B. Button ... O Parnell *F. Lawry ... M Manukau t Sir M. O'Rorke M Franklin ... t Major Harris ... M Wa!P a _ ... F.W.Lang ... O Waikato ... *A. J. Cadman... M Thames ... ... *J. M'Gowan ... M Bay of Plenty *W. Kelly ... M Waiapu *j. Carroll ... M Hawkes Bay ... ... * Captain Russell O Napier ... ... ... S. OarneU ... M Waipawa C. Hall ... ... M Masterton *A. WHogg M Wairarapa . *W. C.Buchanan O New Plymouth *E. M. Smith ... M Egmont ... ... • ... *F.M'Guire ... I Patea... ... ... ...*.&. Hutchison ... 0 Wanganui *A. D. Willis ... M Rangitikei ... _ J. Stevens ... M Palmerston F. Pirani M wa»-'-*. n-A *J. G.Wilson ... O Wellington City * Sir Robert Stout I H. D.Bell ... I -am- a"c ~ * *J. Duthie ... O Wellington Suburbs ... *Dr Newman ... I Nelson City J. Graham ... M Waimea-Sounds *C. H. Mills ... M Wairau ... *T. L. Buick ... M P«Her R.M. M'Kenzie... M Inangahua p. O'Regan .. I *A. R. Guinness. M Westland * Hon. R. Seddon M Ashley. *r Meredith ... M Kaiapoi D. Buddo ... M .V;_ 0. n _**_ ,"* ■■•' - *W.W. Tanner... M Christchurch ... ... * Hon WP Reeves M ~ G. J. Smith ... M T .. W. W. Collins ... M Lyttelton * J. Joyce M Riccarton G.W.Russell ... M Ellesmere W. 11. Montgomery M Selwyn *A. Saunders ... M Ashburton J. M'Lachlan ... M Rangitata W. S. Maslin ... M Pareora F. R. Flatinan ... M Timaru * W. Hall-Jones... I Waitaki *W. J. Steward M Oamaru *T. Duncan ... M Waihemo * Hon. J. M'Kenzie M Waikouaiti t J. Green I Chalmers J.A.Millar ... M Dunedin •■ D. Pinkerton ... M ~ *W. Earnshaw... M ... * W.Hutchison... 11l Caversham A. Morrison ... M Taieri *W. Carncross ... M Bmce * J. Allen 0 Clutha *T. Mackenzie... O Tuapeka t Hon. V. Pyke... M : Wakatipu W. Fraser ... I : Mataura ... R. M'Nab ... M ■ Invercargill *J. W. Kelly ... M ' Awarua * Hon. J. G.Ward M ' Wallace *J. Mackintosh... M j * Sat in last Parliament, t Sat in a previous , Parliament. - ,

THB DIKECT VETO,

Wellington, November 30,

Interviewed at Wellington, Sir R. Stout thus expressed himself on the subject of the elections:—"l have nofc yet gone very carefully through the list of elected candidates, but I can sco easily enough that tho general election result is exactly what I pre-

dieted in the Houae lastj session—(l) that the women's vote would be democratic as I knew it would be; (2) that they would not declare against our secular education system notwithstanding all fche talk of the ruin to this system their exercise of the franchise would bring about; and (3) that they would declare for the direct veto. The Liberal party in the new Parliament is distinctly pledged to the principle of the direct veto. A decided majority of the members bave pronounced emphatically against tho Alcoholic Liquors Sale Control Act of last session, and the principle of the direct veto must be accepted, or else the majority must faco the alternative of a coalition with the Opposition."

Sir K. Stout then ticked off from a list of the newly returned members the names of the direct veto supporters whom ho knew, and this list we (New Zealand Times) have supplemented with the names of Sir G. M. O'Rorke, Major Harris, Mr W. Kelly, Mr J. M'Lachlan, and Mr J. Allen (Bruce). The list, whioh shows a party of 44 members out of 70 in favour of the direot veto, is as follows i—

BIREGT VETO UtE.VnEn.*). North Isum-Sir G. Grey, Sir G. M. O'Rorke, Sis R Stout, Messrs ft H.Houston, R. Thompson,..W. Kelly, O. H. Button, S. Oarnell, 0. Hall, G. Hutohison, H. D. Bell, Jf. Pirani, J.. G.Wilson, Monk, Dr Newman, Major Harris. ■■

Total for North island 16,

Sooth' Island.—Messrs J. Graham, L, Buick, IJ.1 J. J. O'Regan, R. Meredith, D. Buddo. W. W. Tanner, J. Joyce, J. M'Lachlan, W. H. Montgomery, G. W. Russell, G. J. Smith, A. Saunders, W. S. Maslin, F. R. Platman, W. Hall-Jones, W. J. Steward, J. Green, J. A. Millar, D. Pinkerton, W. Earnshaw, W. Hutchison, A. Morrison, J. Allen, T. Mackenzie, V. Pyke, It; M'Nab, J. W. Kelly, J. Mackintosh.

Total for South Island 28',

Grand total 44;

This estimate of the direct veto is generally considered excessive. The Premier claims that he has proof that many of those classfied as vetoists are for his Government first and direct veto after.

some particulars' of new 7 ;:: '-.members; . OTAGO.

Mr James Green, who re-enters Parliament as member fpr Waikouaiti, was born in 1830 in the county of Middlesex, 12 miles out of London. His lather was a mechanic, aud he had thoughts him ' self of being one, but before he had finally made up his mind as to the direction in which to turn his energies he came out to the colony, landing at 1 ort Chalmers in January 1856. Upon his arrival he went to the Tokomairiro district, where he was employed for some time as an agricultural labourer, and subsequently he was by turns a Government contractor, a digger, and a carrier. °I.*i< *« 1861' his name has been closely associated with the progress of the Blueskin district. In that year he was elected a member of the General Road Board, and he held various other positions tin 1867, when he was first elected a member of the Provincial Council for the North Harbour and -"iueskin electorate. He was twice re-elected, and in 1875 he became a member of the Provincial Government. Upon the abolition of the provinces he was m 1876 elected a member of the Waikouaiti County Council, and in the following year was appointed chairman—a position which he has held ever since: . In 1878 he was first elected to the Mouse of Representatives as member for Port Chalmers, and in ISB2 he was elected for Waikouaiti. With the local bodies of the district Mr Green has been closely connected. Since 1868 he has continuously bs'en either president or vicepresident of the Blueskin Agricultural and Pastoral Society; in 1878' he was elected a member of the Otago Education Board, and has retained his seat ever since; he is also a member of the Hospital Board, Charitable Aid Board/Hospital Trust, and Benevolent Trust, and he has served for many years on the Land Board. i -_ML' To I Hr* A. Millar; who has been returned for the Chalmers seat, was born in India in 1855, and is the eldest son of Major-general J. C. Millar, of the Bengal Staff Corps. At the close of the Indian Mutiny he was taken to Scotland, and was educated in Edinburgh. In 1870 he left Great Britain with the intention of learning sheepfarmlng in New Zealand, but upon the voyage took a fancy to the sea, and, after remaining in Dunedin for a few months, was bound apprentice in Messrs. P.. Henderson and Cos. line of vessels, with whicu. he continued trading to the colony almost continuously.until 1881, when he exchanged ship 3 for coastal steamers. In 1887 he finally gave up the sea upon his election as general secretary of the "Federated Seamen's Union of New Zealand— a position which he still occupies. M Mr Arthur Morrison, the Labour member for ■ Caversham, was.born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and attended school till he was nine years of age. He received some education after that at night schools, but he considers he waa really self-taught. He was engaged in farm work till he left for New Zealand in 1874. Since 1875 he has been engaged jas coal salesman for the Walton Park Company. He has always taken an interest'in friendly ; societies, and is a past district president of the Druids. He was selected in 1887 as delegate fo i the Grand Lodge, Victoria. He is also a Freemason, and has taken an interest in temperance work, being connected with the 1.0. G.T. and other organisations. He has also served on school committees. He is a vigorous and forcible speaker, with good command of language. The Hon. V. Pyke, who returns to Parliament as representative for Tuapeka, is so well known that any particulars concerning him seem unnecessary. Born in Somersetshire in 1827 he came oiit to Australia in 1851, and, shortly afterwards donning the blue jumper, proceeded to Forest Creek. After engaging m mining he took to storekeeping, and took an interest in all publio affairs. Entrusted by the minera with a mission to Sir Chas. Hofcham, the Governor, he performed his delicate task withsuch satisfaction that the miners shortly afterwards insisted on electing him as a representative m the semi-nominee council. He took an active part in securing voting by .ballot, the first jexp-eriment of;, the kind-in any part of her Majesty's dominions. After the granting of constitutional government Mr Pyke was elected to represent Castlemaine, and became associated with men whose names have since become household words iv Victoria. In conjunction with Mr [now the Bight Hon.] Hugh C. J_. Childers he was appointed emigration agent inEnglandforVictoria. Returning in 1858 he was appointed warden and magistrate at Bendigo, but in 1862 he resigned to re-enter- politics, becoming Minister and holding the portfolios of Trade, Customs, and Works, and had the pleasure of assisting in the development of the gold discoveries in Gippsland. In 1832 he visited Otago for the sake of his health; and accepted an offer from the Provincial Government to organise and become head of the Mining department. His services were invaluable in framing the regulations which enabled mining to be carried on with scarcely a hitch at a time when hitches might • have proved a serious matter. A dispute with the General Government led to the office being abolished by the Provincial Government, and Mr Pyke was appointed warden and R,M. But politics had an irresistible attraction, and he resigned to enter the Provincial Council and the General Assembly in 1873, being elected to the House to represent Wakatipu. "At the next election he was elected for Dunstan, and continued to represent it till merged into Mount Ida,.when he suffered defeat at. the hands of Mr Scobie Mackenzie. He was the first chairman of the Vincent County Council (named after him), and under his administration it gained the name of the model county. ; Mr William Phaser, who represents Wakatipu, was born in India in 1810 and educated at Guernsey and Jersey, and afterwards. at the Lyce"**, Brittany. Left England for New' Zealand m 185 S. After gaining some knowledge in* agricultural pursuits he bought up the Earnscleugh run, where he resided until recently, when he sold out. He was elected to represent the Dunstan district iv the Provincial Council, also to the Vincent County Council." In 1883 was elected chairman, and held that office for 10 years continuously. He was also elected chairman of the Central Otago Hospital BoaTd in 1885, and still holds that position. Mr Fraser is an Independent, and opposes Bible-reading ih schools. He is not a supporter of the present Government. Mr Robert M'Nab, who replaces Mr Richardson for Mataura, is the oldest son of the late Alexander M'Nab, of Knapdale station, who came out to Australia in 1840 and to Southland in 1855, where he was afterwards Speaker of the Provincial Council. Mr M'Nab was born in Southland in 1861, and was educated. in the Invercargill Grammar School, being dux in 1879. Entered the Otago University next year, where he matriculated and passed the B.A degree in 18S3, taking the senior mathematical scholarship of the New Zealand University of that year. In ISB., at the age of 20, he took "his-M.A. degree with honours in mathematics and mathematical physics. In 1886: he entered the office of Messrs Smith, Chapman, Sinclair, and White, and was admitted to the bar in 1889. Next year he removed to Invercargill, where he commenced the practice of his profession, which he still carries on, and in the same year he obtained the degree of LL.B. from his old university. Mr M'Nab is a prominent volunteer. Formerly a member of the B Battery in Dunedin, in ISS7 he obtained command of the; North Dunedin Rifles, a position which he held until his removal to Invercargill. Captain M'Nab fired in the Otago Ladies' Challenge Team of 188S and the N.Z.R.A. Challenge Team at Blenheim in ISS9, won the Champion Belt of his company in 18S9, and represented Otago in the N.Z.R.A.* Council during that year. Since going to Invercargill he has held command of the G Battery of Artillery, and i.s still a prominent rifle shot, holding a good place in the Southland Rifle Club, and being vice-president of the Mataura Rifle Club. He is a strong supporter of our national system of education and is at present a member of the Southland Education Board and the Board of Governors of. the High Schools. He has devoted considerable time and attention to the establishment of Saturday training classes for teachers and others in Invercargill, and has kept prominently forward the necessity for training classes for young men and young women. Mr M'Nab is president of the Southland Teachers'lnstitute, and has had some expsrience in the conduct of municipal matters. He is a total abstainer and favours local option with a bare majority. Though a prominent Presbyterian he is strongly opposed to denominational education, and on these grounds opposes any alteration of the present Educa-ion Act in connection with Bible-reading iv schools. He is a supporter of the present Government. CANTERBURY

Mr George John Smith, the newly-elected member for*Christchurch, is a native of New castle-on-Tyne, 32 years of age, and is therefore in the prime of life. He was educated at the Wesleyan school in his native place, and afterwards entered the office of Messrs Hamel and Maples, Government solicitors, where he remained for five years. He came to New Zealand in ISSO, and received an'appointment in the office of Messrs Garrick, Cowlishaw, and Fisher, the wellknown solicitors of Chris tchiircb, remaining in this situation for 11 years. For the past five years Mr Smith has been a member of the Sydenham' Borough Council, contesting two elections, and on each occasion being returned at the head of the poll. He was also elected a member of the famous "Prohibition" Licensing Committee in Sydenham. He was a member of a volunteer company of engineers in England, and for three years was a lieutenant in the Christchurch llifles. Both in England and out her. Mr Smith has been an earnest advocate of temperance. Mr William W. Collins, another of the new members for Christchurch, was born in Harborne, Staffordshire, England, in 1851, and is the son of Mr Joseph Collins, a-Birmingham manufacturer. Sir Collins was educated at a private school at Harborne, and subsequently at the Midland Institute, Birmingham. He was destined for a religions pulpit, but ke "adopted the opposite course. He was employed* for some years in

his father's business, bufc eventually becams connected with the Secular Society, of which the late Mr Charles Bradlaugh and Mrs Annie Besant were leading lights. In 1884 he submitted himself for examination to the National Secular Society and received their diploma as a. Freethought lecturer. In 1885 he received an invitation from the Associated.Freethinkers of Sydney to come to that colony for the purpose of lecturing for organising the party. When in Sydney Mr Collins for some time edited a journal entitled The Freethinker, and subsequently went on a lecturing tour to Queensland, Victoria, and New South Wales. For the last four years he has been mostly in New Zealand, and has lectured in Christchurch and other centres of population on Freethought subjects and in defence of the liquor trade. Mr Collins is a very fluent speaker and a man of sound scientific attainments. In politics he is an extremist, but ni3 speeches do not indicate that Ke has any but the most superficial knowledge of New Zealand politics,

George Waiuuh. Russell (Riccarton) is a member of the firm of Meesrs Russell and Willis, printers, Christchurch. He is in the prime of life, and -for some years has taken an active nterest in politics. He learned the business of a printer in-tho-Evening ■ Post Office, Wellington, and for time deserted printer's ink for the pulpit After a spell of evangelistic work in New Plymouth and olsewhore iv connection with the Wesloyan ministry he returned to his first love, and in conjunction with hia brother, Mr J. Russell, started a paper In the Manawatu district. The brothers dissolving partnership, Mr Russell purchased the Waikato Times, which he ran for a time, while ho made hia d&but in the political field, standing as a Candidate against Major Jackson, but was defeated. He camo to _ Christchurch about four years ago,- and started in business as a printer, subsequently entering into partnership with Mr Willis. Ha put up as a candidate for the Heathcote seat at the last general election against Mr R,. Heaton Rhodes and Mr W. W. Tanner, but retired in favour of the latter.

. David Buddo (Kaiapoi) was born in Edinburgh in the fifties, and passed hia youth in an agricultural district, where he acquired a taste for farming. He received a sound education at a public school and with private tutors till he was old enough to enter the cervices of a large firm of mechanical engineers. At 21 years of age Mr Buddo came to New Zealand, reaching the colony at the time the land boom collapsed. In various capacities he went through the life of a hardworking settler, and was enabled to take up farming in the Ellcsniere district, where he was highly successful. After a trip embracing the Home country, Europe and Continent, and America, he returned, and two yeara ago purchased the farm then held by Mr T. S. Mannering at Fernside. Mr Buddo is not a showy speaker, but clear and decisive. He will probably be a very moderate supporter of the present Government. .-•- ---■ William Stephen Maslin, who is elected for Rangitata, . has been a resident of the Geraldine district lor close upon 30 years. In the early days he was engaged in bush work in the Geraldine bush, and afterwards opened a general store, which he carried on for a number of years. He subsequently commenced business as an auctioceerand commission agent, which he still carries on both in Timaru and Geraldine. He is a prominent member of tha Methodist Church, and for many yeara was a local preacher. He also took an interest in local government matters, and was a member of the Geraldine Town Board for several terms. He is a shrewd man of business, and has a good knowledge of all that pertains to agricultural matters.

Frkderick R. Flatjun, Pareora, is a very old resident of the Geraldine district. He resided for some time in Geraldine, and followed the occupation of carter.. He subsequently established a sawmill and general store at the Waihi Bu_h— now known as Woodbury. Mr Flatman has for many years been an active and conscientious worker in local governm_i!t matters. He has been chairman of the .Geraldine Road Board for some time past, and is also a prominent member of the Timaru Harbour Board. ' * -

Mr W. H. Montgomery (Ellesmere) is: the son of the Hon. "W. Montgomery, and was born at Opawa, Christchurch, in 1866. He was educated at Christ s College and the Boys' High School, and spent a year at the New Zealand University. In 1884 he went to England and entered Balliol College at Oxford. He studied law for three years and too* first-class honours for jurisprudence".' After leaving college he entered a solicitor's office in London, and read in Chamber, under Mr Atherley* Jones, M.P., and about that time was called to the Jinghsh bar. He. was at Home six years, and during that time he travelled a great deal over England and the. Continent, studied art painting for a year at London and Paris, intending at one time to take it up as a profession. The idea, however, he relinquished, and came out to New Zealand some three years ago.* He entered Messrs tarnck, Cowlishaw, and Fisher's office, and while there became a barrister and solicitor of New Zealand. He did not pursue this avocation, but took to fanning on land purchased at Little River by his father. In that locality he has taken up his residence.' '

Mr John M'Lachlan (Ashburton) is a native of Ayrshire, and is by trade a plasterer. He is 54 years of age, and landed at Lyttelton in 1861. He followed his trade in Christchurch for three yeara, and since then has been farming in the Ellesmere district. He has several times tried unsuccessfully to get into Parliament. Once he contested a seat against Messrs E. Lee and Richardson, once against Mr'E. Wakefield, and twice against Sir John Hall: He is to a large extent self-educated, is ready of- speech,* and has a pretty good grasp of

WEST COAST.

Mr P. J. O Regan, who was elected for Inangahua, is a native of New Zealand, of Irish parentage. He was born at Charleston (West Coast) in 1889, being, therefore, now2_ years of ag». His parents were pioneer settlers ;.he was biought up on a farm; andhe is to a great extent a self-educated ?* aS.* He is a supporter of constitutional reform in the direction of an'elective Ministry and the referendum, and. is also a great believer in the single tax. He was first introduced to public notice by contesting the Inangahua seat with Sir Kobert Stout at the by-election last June; upon the retirement of Mr. R. H. Reeves, being ou that occasion beaten by his opponent. Since then he has lectured 'in various parts of the colony oh the question of the single tax. For some years past he has been connected with newspaper work, and until he entered upon his last year', campaign he was conducting the Reeffcen Times. ■ *.;.■'

; NELSON. "'7-7 7 ■ 7.' ,-M*"-John Graham, who was born at Riwaka about SO years ago, is a son of one of the original settlers of 1842. He located himself in Nelson as a tinsmith, and proved himself a successful man °. •-™s">e--a' Several times he has been a member of the City. Council, a position which he at present holds. He is chairman of the Nelson School Oommittee; is a fluent speaker, and a man of ability and force of character. On a former occasion he stood for Nelson, bat was defeated. ,7.' WELLINGTON. 1 Mr Henry Francis;Dillon BEix,'one of the three members elected for Wellington, is the eldest son of Sir F.. Dillon Bell. He was educated at the Otago Boys' High School and St. John's College, Cambridge, where he graduated with mathematical honours in'lß73. ?"&?. s? a E* A** of tlle New * Zealand University. - In IS7- he was called to the bar of the Middle Temple, and shortly afterwards returned, to New Zealand and joined Mr C. B. Izird ia partnership. He was appointed Crown Srlicitor for Wellington in 1888, and held office untii on the eve of his candidature for Wellington he resigned, tke'ppsition. He has been twice elected mayor of Wellington. Mr Bell is well-known as an able lawyer, and has once or twice refused a seat on the Supreme Court bench. _ _ HAWKE'S BAY. Mr 0. Hall, the new member for Waipawi*, is a carpenter. He was Mr W. C. Smith's first lieutenant in that district. The only public office he has. held hitherto is a seat on the Land Board, to which he was appointed by the present Government, who also made him a J.P. His speeches were made up of scraps of Ministerial addresses badly delivered. Politically he will be nonentity, on all occasions voting with. Mr Seddon. Mr S. Carnell, who succeeds Mr Swan as Napier's representative, is *' a^ •photographer here, and an old resident. He is; a member of the Harbour Board as a nominee of the,, present Government, and was among the last batch of J.Ps. He is also a member of the Charitable Aid and Hospital Board. He is a fluent, rapid speaker, of extreme Radical views, verging on downright Socialism. He wants to see the present land tax very much increased until all laTge estates are burst up. He is, however, out of politics, a genial'though excitable man, very suspicious of the motives of those opposed to him., AUCKLAND. Mr C. E. Button, elected to represent Auckland City, is a native of Launceston, Tasmania, and came to this colony in ISS3. He was admitted to the bar and practised the legal profession for some time at Invercargill, where he proved himself a clever criminal lawyer. He was one of the many who left the city of the south for Hokitika, where he remained till 1881. During his residence on the West Coast he held a seat in the County Council of Westland before it was made into a province. He was also at one time mayor of Hokitika. In January 1876 he was elected to the House of Representatives, but resigned his seat after the session of 1577, when:'the Grey Government came into power. He did thisbecausehis constituents passed a resolution at a public meetfeg thanking him for past se*. ices and regretting that they were not represented by a supporter of the Grey Government. Mr Button came to Auckland

to join jihe firm of Whitaker and Russell, solicitor?, in ISB3. He has been returned unopposed seven times in succession as mayor of Birkenhead, where he resides. Mi*W..Crowther, elected to represent Auckland City, is an old resident of Otago. On removing to Auckland he entered into business as a 'bus and cab proprietor and livery stablekeeper. Some 25 or 26 years ago he established the 'bus traffic between Auckland and Newmarket, gradually improving the same until it became one of the most efficient services of Auckland. It is only recently tbat he has retired from business life. He has always taken a great interest iv civic affairs, having been a hard-working and painstaking member of the City Council for about 16 years. He succeeded Mr J. H. Upton as mayor of Auckland, and has held that position for two years. Mr Orowther has therefore had a fairly good training for political life.

Hon. J. Carroll (Waiapu) was born in 1557 at Waiora, Hawke's Bay. He was educated at a European school in Napier, and afterwards went to his father's station. He next became a cadet iv the office of Mr Locke, Native commissioner for the East Coast, being subsequently transferred to the Native Office at Wellington. In 1879 he was appointed inte prefer to the House of Representatives. Resigning this po*-t in 'SS3 he contested the Eastern Maori electorate with Wi Pere bufc was defeated. .At the next election, however' he was successful, and has remained in the House ever since. He is a fluent speaker, possesses many natural advantages, and has great influence with the Maoris. On account of his qualifications he was made a Minister without portfolio in the Native department in the Ba'lance-Seddon Administration, and in the closing session of last 'Parliament was in charge of Native legislation Major Benjamin Harris (Franklin) is the eldest son of the late Mr George Harri** who for many years was a well-to-do farmer atHuntingdon, Tamaki, near Otahuhu. The major has both Irish and French blood in his veins Major Harris was born in January 1533. Two years after his birth the family went to Canada They arrived in Wellington in 1547. "When the major was quite a young man, about 22 years of age he removed to Pukekohe, commencing farmine operations on a 400-acre block of land, and this farm is still _ hi* Ifc" is part of a thriving district known as Harrisville He was a pioneer in his district, and ou the arrival of immigrants to settle on part of the confiscated territory he was appointed - immigration officer. Iv local matters Major Harris has ever taken a keen interest, being chairman of the Pukekohe Ea.t Highway Board. He was several times a member of theManukau County Council, and has ofteu served on school committees. He was also a member of the Provincial Council. In ISS9 he

contested and gained a seat li" the House of Repre-: . 'sentatives for Franklin. In thS following year he was chosen as Opposition whip?, . After a lively • contest he was again returned to th£ Assembly ar*.....

representative for Franklin.

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Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTION., Otago Daily Times, Issue 9929, 23 December 1893, Supplement

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5,863

THE GENERAL ELECTION. Otago Daily Times, Issue 9929, 23 December 1893, Supplement

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