Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS

CITY NOMINATIONS.

DUNEDIN EAST. From four lo five hundred electors attended the nomination of candidates for ths representation of Dunediu East in the new Parliament. 'J he Returning Officer, Mr A.. Slewurt, read lho ■ v.. it, which he had received by telegraph, and ! invited nominations. I Mr VV. Wuiriii-r proposed Sir Robert Stout, and iv doing so said that he had known bim and hud watched bin career for 20 years, and that he was a man of whom any country might be proud.—(Applause.) Who was it they could send in the place of Sir R. Stout? —(A Voice: "Allen," applause aud dissent.) He had nothing to say against Sir R. Stout's opponent Mr A lieu had spent most of his time in tho old country; and if they looked round the ward they would see a large quantity of land not built upon, and respecting that land he would remark that had Mr Allen wanted to do good tos his tollows it would have been occupied with houses ior the working classes, who had been driven out of town to find building accommodation. Mr Joim Hislop seconded Sir K. Stout's nomination. Mr W. P. Street, who was received with applause and uproar, said there were always two sides to a question, a „d if they would permit him he would explain the side he bad taken lit a very few minutes. The election, he maintained, was not to be contested upon personal grounds at all-it was not a question of Allen against Stout or even of Freetrade v. Protection. _ (Cries of "Yes" and "No") Ihere was a greater and more serious question underlying the contest. This was the election of the colony-fhear, hear)-aud the questions to be decided were: Was there to be further increase of taxation, and had the Ministry carried out its retrenchment pledges ? Ho concluded by nominating Mr James Allen for Dunedin East. Mr Roiimt Hamilton seconded tho nomination.

No other candidates were proposed. Sir It. Stout, who was both cheered and interrupted frequently during the delivery of his speech, said he hoped his proposer and seconder would not object to what he was going to say, but he must remark that the best speech on his behalf had been made by Mr Street, who had told them that ho (the Premier) was personally respected in the district, and that there was no objection to him personally. If that was so, why was he opposed?—(A Voice: "Your policy.") He would deal with that presently. It was said that the opposition was not to him, but to the Government. If that were so, then the points of policy to which the opposition was directed should have been mentioned. Was it opposition to a policy of borrowing to complete the public works? It was simply impossible at present to stop carrying on public works, and if the cost of continuing them was cast upon the consolidated revenue, it would place a strain upon the revenue which it could not bear, and increase the burdens of the people to such an extent as to bring about insolvency and ruin, and millions of money would be deft unproductive. As showing the necessity for continuing the public works, he mentioned that, having visited all parts of the colony, he could say there was no portion of New Zealand where there were more opportunities for setting people on the land than in the interior of Otago, and that if the Otago Central line were pushed ou they would soon have hundreds of homes and thousands of people whore there were now none. It could not surely be said that tho colony ought to stop the construction of public works, for that would mean no progress. He could understand being careful in our expenditure of borrowed money, and had always advocated that; but to suddenly and ruthlessly stop tho expenditure of borrowei money would inflict enormous injury upou the colony, and there would then really be ruinous taxation. Then* as to increased taxation, the statements made respecting the proposals of the Government were absolutely incorrect. If they took the Customs receipts .for 1882 aud compared them with what the proposed tariff was estimated to yield, they would find that the proposed taxation through the Customs was £56,000 less than the returns for 18S2. Tho real test was to take the taxation per head, and the taxation per head through the Customs would have been less than it had been for tho past 20 years. It was useless to ignore the fact that there were sections iv the community and throughout the colony who always had done and always would do all they could to keep him (tho speaker) out of Parliament. This was the sixth contest in which he had been engaged, aud he had had opposed to him the same class of people on almost every occasion. It was not so much objection to the Government as objection to himself personally, for many who were opposing him would not oppose other members of the Government. He had never changed his views, and it was because of his views on the land question, ou the local industry question, and on the education question that he was opposed. He had never referred to his opponent, aud was not going to refer to him, but was content to explain his principles, and to let them speak to tho electors; and it was for the electors of Dunedin East to say whether they would have as their representative a man who had constantly adhered to his political creed, and who had been consistent in voting in the same direction upou every occasion. He challenged anyone to name a question in respect of which he had changed his opinion since he had entered political life.— (A Voice : " Reduction of members.") He was opposed to a reduction of members, and had always voted in lhat direction. Now that Provincialism had been abolished, it was not in the interests of Democracy that the number of members should be decreased. Those who did not wish to see the government of the colony pass iuto the bauds of the wealth classes and be controlled by large companies should not favour a reduction of members. As to Freetrade and Protection, he maintained that so long as we had a customs tariff it ought to be so shaped as to encourage local industries; aud he claimed that, regarding the laud question, the report of Mr M'Kerrow upon the settlement of the people on the land—an impartial departmental reportbore indisputable testimony to the success of Mr Ballance's land administration. It was necessary, he contended, that representatives should find a leader on one side of politics or the other, and said that Major Atkinson was disowned by some merely because they were afraid to acknowledge him before an Otago constituency as a leader; but he considered that Major Atkinson, who had been elected the leader of a great party in this country, ought not to be treated with disrespect in the way he was by some who really were his followers. There were but two parties in the House, and Major Atkinson was the leader of one of them. In concluding, he said that any person who had a business to attend to, and went into the House, was making a great sacrifice for the people; and unless he went to the House thinking that after all he was speaking tho minds of the people, he really had but^a poor recompense. He (Sir Robert) did not ask for a single vote from any one of the electors unless they thought that he was true to his political principles, and agreed with his political principles. He would tell them frankly that in going into the House he was making a greater sacrifice than any one of them would make. But if they thought he could be of assistance to the country—not merely to Dunedin or to the district of Otago, but ta the colony—then he was^ready to go up and fight for tiny principles ho had fought, for before. If, however, they chose to say they did not wish his services, he should retire iuto private life with no ill-feeling towards them. Still, he was willing to serve them, and he believed the polling day would sliow that the people of Duuedin East had confidence in him. Mr James Allen (who was also frequently applauded and interrupted when speaking) said that he had no desire to import into the contest any personal considerations, but he was compelled, in consequence of letters published over the signature of "Probity," to give some explanations. Some rumours had beeu circulated, which he supposed wero tho outcome of some correspondence that he had had with Sir R. Stout. A false interpretation had been placed upon those rumours, aud he must ask for some explanation. One of the rumours was that he wrote to the Government a.'fgw months ago asking for a billet. Sir B. Stout was the only member of the Government he had written to, and he would him to state if he had ever applied for a billet. Sir R. Stout : No, never. Mr Ali.kn : Another rumour was that he had wished them success on their financial proposals ou tho vote of want of confidence. Had he done anything of the kind ? Sir !R. Stout regretted that this personal matter should have been raised. Mr Allen had only written to him two letters, aud if Mr Allen had no objection, he would haed them to the reporters. Mr Allen had never written asking for a billet. Mr Allen replied that Sir R. Stout had his permission to publish the letters, and they were handed to tho press. The letters were as follows:—

Dunedin, ISth April ISS7. Mr dear Sir Robert, I think I will act upon the suggestion contained in 3-our telegram, and will lind my waylu Wellington when the session has commenced, where no doubt one can pick up a (jriat dral of useful informal ion nnd gain some experience, I am exceedingly obliged to you fur troubling lo send a telegram, and only regret I had not the pleasure of Eceiiig you when in Dunedin. (In many ot tlie questions which interest us in New Zealand I fancy I held much the same views as you. and that bus been one reason why I havo ventured to ho her you in the matter; and, further than this, I felt- the' necessity of some advice if I ventured into politics, and could not pick upon anybody whose counsel seemed soiniichwort.il having as yolirs. The. fact is, I want something more to do oiifsid„ of my own private concerns, and s-vera! friends have urged upon me politics as a duty. Hoping Lady Stout is well,'and with my best wislies-yours very truly, James Ali.kx.

My dear Sir Robert,—This morning I received a letter signed W. J. lfabens, notifying my appointment as a member of the Otago University Council. I h«c written to him wishing him lo convoy to his Excellency the Governor my anpi-eeiatiJn' of this liuiluur. Hut l must al the same time convi.3-lu you also my thanks, for I gather from your telegi-.-im that you arc I Ire chief one to whom mv thaiilis me due. We are all looking I'.irwarii lv the result, of tonight's debate, and I send you my (joint wishes that you may succeed. I hope 1 may find my way to Wellington wiihin a week or I wo, hut I lnvu lirst lo taken rrip down youth. Trusting Hint both Lndy Stout and yourself are well, - Ilelicve nui to be. youi's James Ah.un. Clyde street, Dunedin, May 10. 'Mr Ali.e.v continued rHy had raised the question to ask Sir R. Stout if he had any charge to make against him arising out, of the correspondence to make it withoutdelay, so that he might have a chance of replying. As to his (Mr Allen's) candidature, ho would say that ho

was standing before them because the voice of the country was asking for a radical change, lhat such a demand was made might be galhere,! from the. speeches that were made by candidate* one after the other, and was also proved by hi,, presence to contest the election with the Ir, inier. ife was there in response to a call irom a very large number of electors, and, m responding to that call, was doing what was in his plain duty. H„ would any again th.it he had no personal animosity towards Sir it. Stout, whom he called and always looked upon, and hoped to continue to look upon, as his friend. The question at issue was one of principle, aud upon it he appealed to the electors. The unexampled and long-continued depression tho colony had suffered in common with other part's of the world had been here intensified by heavy taxation and tho drain for interest upou unproductive expenditure. At the last general election his present opponent had been returned, and the result was tho formation of the Stout-Vogel combination—and whatever confidence he had possessed in Sir It. Stout himself, he had nuver had any in tbat combination. If ever men wero returned to Parliament upon certain policies, he maintained that the Opposition members at the last elections were ; and that of the two policies were— the substitution of a land and income tax for the property tax, and retrenchment. How far had they carried out or backed their opinions with regard to a land and income tax P Had they attempted it at all? No,they had not. (Sir R. Stout: " We did.") And what had they done with regard to retrenchment ? How far had they carried out that policy ? It had not been carried out at all as demanded. It was of no use taking one department and sayiDg thero was a decrease in expenditure there when in another department there was an increase; and it was of no use taking the annual appropriations and saying there was a decrease in the amount voted under them when there was a large increase in the permanent appropriations. What they should do was to take the wholo ™m a"v then see for themselves whether tnere had been an increase or a decrease; and when that was dove they would see there was a large increase iv the expennrnnMh.f'f l° retreuchDient- if they needed proof that further retrenchment was possible, he would go „o further than to quote the lrem.er at old Knox Church, where he said he saw his way to £100,000 reduction. If the Premier had seen that three years before, and reduced the expenditure to that extent,and had done the same thing the second year, the result now would be that there would be no deficit at all, but a surplus of £200,000, without any necessity for increased taxation. On the 10th of May the Financial Statement was made, and a few days afterwards the want-of-confidence motion, declaring the financial proposals unsatisfactory, was made, and was ultimately carried. That was the issue before the country, and no other issue could be placed before them. s t was for the people to say if they were in favour ot the financial proposals of the present Government, which were that they should have an ■ enormously increased taxation; or were they in ; favour of economy, of thrift, and of selfreliance? This was the plain issue before taem—there was no other—aud they would have to decide for themselves whether they would have further burdens or return to tho true liberal policy of self-reliance. He stood to reprr ent, and hoped he should represent, those who were determined upou a policy of economy and self-reliance; and there was the Government, on the other hand, with the Premier, who stood for increased taxation. Under which banner would they place themselves? WiuM they place themselves uuder the "Blue 1 eter of governmental extravagance ? And why did he said the " Blue Peter " ? Becau:e it w?? composed of a Conservative Liberalism which was not the true outcome of our democracy. In it there was some true ring of Liberalism, but there was the blue border of tho Conservative—of tbat blue, venous, impure blood winch had lost its oxygen, its life, and its vitality. Would they be under that banner which he had raised—the banner of true Liberalism, of honesty, and progress? That was the question. Progress could not come about unless they had economy, thrift, and self-reliance; but these things would bring progress, and progress was Liberalism. This was the true issue, and he wonld leave it in their hands, confident that they would he true to their honest feelings and honest principles.

The Returning Orncxnthen called fora show of hands. The show of hands was taken twice without Mr Stewart being able to say who had the majority. It was then taken a third time, and Mr Stewart said that, as far as he could make out, there were 250 hands held up for Sir Robert Stout and about 250 for Mr Allen.

Mr Allen asked if there were not more for him ; and

The Returning Officer said there were perhaps 255 for Mr Allen, aud declared the show of hands in favour of him.

Sir R. Stout demanded a poll, and stated that as the Government policy had been attacked by Mr Allen, he should take occasion to reply at his meeting.

A vote of thanks to the returning officer closed the proceedings.

DUNEDIN WEST,

The Albany street Hall was the place for receiving nominations for Dunedin West, and about CO persons assembled there at noon. The usual preliminaries having been attended to, Mr J. T. Mackehras said: Mr Returning Ollicer and gentlemen,—l beg to nominate Mr William Downie Stewart for the district of Dunedin West. Mr Stewart is a supporter of the present Government, and as such I claim for him the support of the electors of Dunedin West.—(Cries of" Oh !") Notwithstanding the adverse criticism of a portion of the Otago press, I hold that the present Government deserve the support of the people of Otago.—(Applause.) I cannot forget the injustice which we received at the hauds of what was known at the time, and still is known, as the Continuous Ministry, under Major Atkinson; and I am sure the electors of Dunediu West only require to be reminded of the wrongs we suffered under that Administration—( A Voice: "Not greater than the present, certainly ")—to return again Mr Downie Stewart as our representative. Mr Stewart has served us in Parliament for the past three years; he has fulfilled his promises to the electors; he has done the people, I make bold to say, good service; he hrs initiated and carried through many important reforms; and he has obtained for this district local wants which had been previously neglected. For these reasons I am satisfied that the great majority of the electors of Dunedin West will recognise his houest and faithful services in the past and return him again as their representative. I have much pleasure therefore in nominating on this occasion Mr William Downie Stewart to represent the electors of Dunedin West in the Parliament of New .Zealand. Mr John Matuews said that hitherto he had been a supporter of the Hon. Thomas Dick, but he recognised that in the present state of the depression in New Zealand they had to look to measures, and not to men. It was with regret that he now found himself actively opposing Mr Dick, whom he had always looked on with very great personal regard, and should contiyue to do till his days were ended. But looking at the colony's position, and seeing the mighty results of Protection in Victoria, it was absolutely necessary that Protection should be given a trial here. He felt so acutely on this question that he would put his own brother on one side were he a Freetrader. Knowing Victoria aud her prosperity, he spoke from facts with which he was intimately acquainted and not from suppositions, and he defied anyone to refute what he had to 6ay. Seeing the" advantages New Zealand possessed, it should be the garden, and Victoria the desert.—(" Oh," aud applause.) He claimed that the present Government had done more for the working men than any previous Administration. Mr E. E. C. Quick had a great deal of pleasure in nominatiug'the Hon. T. Dick—(Applause.) He had known Mr Dick for something like a quarter of a century, and in all tbat time he had not known anything but good of him. He was an old aud tried servant; he had beeu a long time before the public—(A Voice : " Too long ") —and a great deal of his time had been spent in the public service; therefore he was possessed of considerable experience. Mr Dick was, moreover, possessed of a great deal of probity. With refercuce to what had fallen from the various speakers, he (Mr Quick) could not say that he was satisfied with the present Government, wbo had, in his opinion, shown a great want of grasping the situation. During these depressed times the country had been got .further and further into debt, and it was now absolutely necessary to return men pledged to retrenchment of a radical kind. As to Protection also he differed entirely from tho last speaker. That Victoria was in a prosperous state was true, but this was in spite of her protective tariff. The best proof of that was that in Victoria less operatives were engaged than in the sistar colony of New South Wales, where Freetrade existed.

Mr James Lambert (North-East Valley), in secouding the nomination, said that though he had known Mr Dick for 24 years he had never heard anything against his character. Mr Dick had always beeu a conscientious, strightforward man, and that was the class of politician that was required. As regarded Protection, the speaker said that he had recently altered his opinions. He had belonged to the Manufacturers' Association, but he had come to the conclusion that Protection ouly benefited the manufacturer and the capitalist, the working man having to pay tho extra duty imposed. A show ef hands was taken as follows:—For Mr Stewart, 20; for Mr Dick, 25. Tho result was received with cheers.

Mr Mackerras challenged the numbers, saying that some hands held.up in the doorway had not been couuted. He asked for a fresh show of hands.—(Cries of "No.") The Retuuniso Officer (Mr J. Jackson): There "can be no wrong done to anyone by calling for a show of hands again.

Mr I. Isaacs: It says very little for tho opposing side if they have not confidence in the returning officer.—(Applause.) I should uphold my position if I were the returning officer. The Returninu Officer said that he would make no mistake in the numbers on the second count, aud weut into thu body of the hall to count the hands. The second scrutiny gave Mr Stewart 21, and Mr Dick 30; thcannomicement being received with prolonged applause. Mr Stewart said that he was gratified at tbe great nitcrot niaiiiTwted iv this election, and he regretted the wautof interest iv public matters in the past. With regard to one important question he wished to give no uncertain sound, because during the last eight; or nine years he had been 111 favour ol' » nalioiiil policy—that was New Zealand for the. New Ze.aland'ers,—aud ho' maintained that a judicious system of Protection was essential for the prosperity of the colony. Like a child, a young colony required to be nursed till it gained a sufficient amount of strength to get along; and he was satisaed that with judi-

cious Protection the colony would progress (to use a well-known expression) by leaps and hounds. Ho had scon tho results of Protection iv America, Canada, and Victoria, and said the decliii-atiou chat Protection leads to increased prices was mi-re humbug. Me was speaking tho other eveiiiiii! on this quesiiou lo a young Inly, and she put it very happily : " If returned, will ynu protect our young men from goingi-nt of the polony and marrying elsewhere-"—(Laughter.) He was sorry to say that we. were doing iv this colony what had long been done in Tasmania— j using the place as a nursery, and thvu when our boys had learnt a trade,allowing them to go elsewhere. It was a most suicidal policy to spend enormous sums of money year alter year on education, nnd to hud that immediately people wero able to do for themselves they went elsewhere to live. Eight or nine years ago he came to this conviction, and ho had been written down by a portion of the press for it; itought to be the duty of the State to see that every person got a fair prolit for his day's work, and that no person should bo aslsc.l to do too much. Protection was absolutely wanted in a young country like this. As to tho croaking of which we heard so much, he thought that that was only temporary, and that by careful nvrt economic administration of the resources of tbo colony it would be impossible to kill it.— (Applause.) Why, we had coal iv abundance, which was a wealth in itself; and tbat iv thu end would bo the backbone of tho colony. He hoped that the present contest would be carried out fairly, and whatever tho result was ho should bo content with the decision of the electors As he had previously said, he was not Eoin'g to make auy appeal on personal grounds; ho believed he had served his constituents faithfully in tho past-(A Voicer "What about Sidey's bill'.")-and ho had received expressions of confidence from unexpected quarters Only that morning a public mau in Auckland had expressed the hope that he would be returned, and promising his assistance in that direction—(A Voice: "Aitken Conuell," and laughter)—which showed that the election was not merely a local one. lie had unbounded confidence iv the colony, and did not think that whoever was returned to tho new Parliament would bring it to grief. The Hon. Mr Dick said hehad been delighted to hear the proposer of Mr Stewart declare that Mr Stewart was a Government supporter. He had been wanting to find out what his opponent was, but had always thought he was undecided till the distinct assurance just given, and which was not denied.—(Laughter.) Only yesterday he (tho speaker) had heard of two parties promising their votes to Mr Stewart because he was going to vote against the Government. For tho next week, at all eveuts, it would be understood that Mr Stewart was a supporter of the Government and he au opponent, aud in fighting ho only asked a fair field aud no quarter. The proposer oE Mr Stewart had spoken in very high terms of the existing Government—existing, he hoped, for a short time only.—; Laughter.) He could only say that during the last three years the country had been going back nt a very unprecedented rate.—(A Voice : " What about the three years before ?") The depression, it was true, began iv 1870, but he affirmed that the colony had gone back nt au unprecedented rate since Sir Julius Vogel's assertion that it would advance by luap- and bounds if he could only get possession of the sinking fund. It had been said that the Stout-Vogel Government had done a great deal for the country; but what they ha I done was in a backward way—sending us downwards instead of upwards. The Government bad been belauded, but he was prepared to say that even the Continuous Miiii.-try.of which Mr Mackerras sooke'so disparagingly, "did no worse but better than the. pr<«sent Government. It was more watchful for the interests oE the country, moro earnest for the good of the country.—(An Electors "In robbing us of our funds.") It administered its affairs with scrupulous propriety and with statesmanlike ability ; and at the conclusion ot its term of office it came out of its services at least with a character less tarnished aud more approved oE by the country than that of the present Government at this moment.— (Mr Mackerras : " Then why did the country turn them out? ") There was another Government going to be turned out directly.—(Laughter.) From the interest taken in this election it was evident that the country would demand retrenchment—tho roar of retrenchment, as it had been called, had been heard from tho Bluff to the North Cape, and whatever Government got into power must listen to that cry. Ho trusted that it would be realised that those who Were opposed to the Government were going in bald-headed for retrenchment. The present Government did not profess retrenchment; at least Sir Julius Vogel, the leading man in the Cabinet, did not. Hi- said that it could not bo done, aud his proposal was to borrow. The Government had been called a Middlo Island Government, whereas it was simply a Canterbury Government. Sir Julius Vogel was a Canterbury representative; he had given Canterbury the Midland railway, and with the Hon. E. Richardson's aid had reduced the railway rate on gram. The proposer of Mr Stewart had referred to the Otago Central railway.—(Mr Mackerras denied that he had done so.) Well, that old bugbear Was always brought up—(Laughter.) He Claimed that the Atkinson Government had done better for it than the present Administration.—(Mr Mackerras: "Mr Dick is stating what is not correct," and uproar.) Well, he would aive figures since his assertion was challeugedr The previous Government had let contracts for £100,000 out Of £13U,UU0 voted ; the present Government had got £400,000 voted for their three years of office, and they had spent about £230,000, so the proportion was very much iv favour oi the previous Government. Ou the matter of Protection he was delighted to hear Mr Stewart speak bo decidedly. He bad bad a letter from the Protection League asking him if he would adopt the league's basis of 20 per cent, at least on everything that could be raised or manufactured in the colony, and as he could not consent ho was therefore out of it.—(Laughter.) There were articles ou which it might be expedient lo raise the duty, but to tax all classes of goods by 20 per cent. —and in some cases perhaps SO or 40 per cest— seemed to him a hardship on the. working men which they could not endure. He agreed -with Mr Stewart that they must not despair of the country, but a great deal depended on the proper administration of its affairs. Vor the last year or two capital had been held back and capital had been going away, and as a consequence of the departure of capital labour had to follow. What was wanted was a Government that would give stability to the country, and therefore encourage capital to come and to remain. He was glad to find that Mr Stewart, in his humility, was willing to be relegated to private life—a course that would result from his (Mr Dick) being placed at the head of the poll. Mr Stewart complained that his opponent had not acted fairly in dealing with a large number of matters that he had not referred to. A poll was demanded on behalf of Mr Stewart.

DUNEDIN CENTRAL. > A very large number of persons attended at ' the Garrison Hall. Mr A. R. Ure (returning j officer) having read the writ, , Mr J. B. Thomson rose aud said that ho had ' much pleasure on the present occasion in pro- ' posing Mr Edward Bowes Cargill as member for Dunedin Central. He had known Mr Cargill j for 23 years, and to most, of those present that j ; gentleman had been known as long as they had been in the colony; and they were aware that he had always upheld, with hand, voice, and purse, every good work amongst us, Mr Cargill's father had been associated with the pioneers in founding this colony, and the candidate himself was not 0. babe in politics, nor a three-year-old suckling.- He had worked hard in the community and knew its wants, and was tho sort of mau that should be returned at this crisis, when economy was not a matter of politics but a matter of necessity. He was sure that Mr Cargill would commend himself to the intelligent portion, at all events, of the constituency.—(Uproar, and a cry "Take that back.") He would repeat what he had said— (further disorder)—and would say, without fear of the result, that on polling day the candidate he had proposed would be at the top of the poll. Mr R. S. Sparrow seconded Mr Cargill's nomination without further remark. Mr B. Hallenstein, who was received with sustained cheering, begged to propose Dr Frederick Fitchett as a candidate. It was with some reluctance aud with a grave sense of respoasibility that he proposed Dr Fitchett iv opposition to so old and respected a citizen as Mr Cargill. But the times were too serious to permit any feeling of sentiment to pervade their actions. The bulk of tho press of Dunedin were trying to make the people believe that Protection was only a side issue—(A Voice: "So it is"),—but he need hardly say that it was the main question upon which this election was being fought. Whatever Government were iv power, economy and the tapering olf of loans would be forced upon them. Far be it for him to say auythiug against such a course if judiciously carried out, but woe betide us if Ibis policy were not counterbalanced by a policy of Protection. If this were not adopted, aud an cflort were not made to retain amongst us the three millions of money sent out for articles which could be manufactured here, the result would be most disastrous for all classes. Mr Cargill had announced that he would go in the direction of Protection; but of what avail would that he, for whatever party he allied himself to

would be dictated to by the hand of influential

Freetraders. Dunediu Central was the most important electorate in New Zealand. Iv it were tho largest manufactories, and it contained a large number of artisans. Unless manufactures flourished aud artisans were prosperous, commerce and farming aud all would suffer. In Dr Fitchett they had a man who would represent the constituency with credit to himself and advantage to the electorate. He was a man of intelligence and ability, and had qualities which especially commended him to the speaker—the qualities of industry and perseverance, which must cause him to become a power in Parliament. It was with much pleasure, therefore, that he proposed Dr Fitchett as the mau they desired to see elected. —(Loud applause.) Mr H. Muir, in seconding Dr Fitchelt's nomination, said he thought that foremost amongst the candidate's many good qualities was that ho was a staunch supporter of the present Government, and was possessed of an earnest desire to assist in legislating fur the welfare of the colony as a whole, and not for tbe advantage of a. few ruuhokltrs and wealthy merchants. It was a healthy sign of Ihe times to see the Government opposed by liicn holding laree areas of land—sunn men as Mr Scobio Mackenzie.— (Cries of " Ob.") He took it that it wa-. the effort of ll'r Govi.rurm.-ut lv i,reri;,b.::e fur th-' welfare of thi; pei'-plti '.hit had m.-.de tluna ,„,- .popular wi'-h the moneyed circ-os. Aii,"i,;.>! the objections r:ii.-ed to Dr Fitchett was tbat two years since lie was a Freetrader anil was now a Protectionist. -Was that n disgrace, for any man to make himself familiar with two

sides of a subject and to give his support to that side which was the strongest ?—(Laughter.) From a theoretical Freetrader Dr Fitchett hail come to be a practical Protectionist, and when the polling day came ho (tho speaker) hoped the electors would give no i.neerli.in sound as to the opinions they held on I his important question. No winder tho Daily Tin),-■ »ns in love with Mr Senile Mackenzie.. specially when the e'n-eii.ii.Ullices under which Mr Astlcrolt had resigned the editorship of that journal wero „oi.Mdcred.-(Groi.ns.) Tlu.-e facts spoke lor t'-emselvo-;. rind be would urge the. wi.geearners, if lli-.y Im! the. inti-rcts olt the '"'-" ny at beavt, to rally r-unul th,, (.lovei-niuen and return i-iitif supporters by substantiul majorities. .... ~ Tbo Ri-TUiwixu OiricKt! then invited tho candidates to address tho meeting, and hoped they void,! ho mn.ler.de. iv their remarks and , ~r. r -■_,■._ ..cviir^ iuai.il. ivns the dinner

l°Mr ('AiiOii-i. would not inflict « speech upon those pr.-M-ni. ; ibis was nui the lime for it. He had taken frequent opportunities of meeting thu electors, and had obtained a hearty response to aud approval of his views; and if thero were, auy points ou which ho had not made himself clear, such matters could be touched on at his next meeting. The central point of this election was the. state of the. linaiices of the oniony.—(A Voice : " No.") Ho was quite sure that it w. s as he had stated—(renewed dissent)—and had no doubt that throefourths or live-sixths of thoso present would agree with him. The first thing to be douo was to thoroughly overhaul the colonial finance, to get rid of everything that was unnecessary, and to cut down all demands on the cjnsolidiitcd revenue before imposing further taxation. Then it was important to see that employment was provided for those who were in want of it. Ho had worked hard during the last 30 years to promote the industries of the colony, and was no mere theorist on the subject, but hud acted on the principles he professed. In this connection he had nothing to say against his opponent, further than this: that Dr Fitchett should havo been one of his chief supporters. A writer of "Notes" in last nights Star had held him (Mr Cargill) up to reprobation on th" assumption that for electioneering purposes he had altered his opinion m respect to Protection. That was false. He had been all his life a believer in moderate Protection through the Customs when necessary, aud had held the opinion that local iudustries w-cre entitled to a fair and reasonable sharo ot support through the tariff. His third point was that tho utmost freedom should be afforded in encouraging the settlement of land by people engaged in' pastoral and agricultural pursuits. He had heard himself referred to iv connection with dummyism and the holding of large areas of land; but he had had nothing to do with dummyism, and had never had any interest m land except that some years ago he held a fourth interest iv a run up at Mauiototo. He believed in such settlement of the land as would enablo men to take it up aud prosper by their work; though' he did not care about having such elaborate regulations in regard to land settlement, as they wero difficult to understand thoroughly. He might say, further, that he had taken great interest in oiiueation'd mutters, both mi the old school committee and in the Provincial Council, and hoped that nothing would occur to take away from us the privilege i>r educating eve.iy chiln in ; th,- country. He wan in favour of facilme- being • given for maintaining liicher education ; and, in t fact, was desirous of the perpetuation of all the , good points of our present system. At the sumo time, he did not agree with those who said that the education system must not be touched. Everything unnecessary must be cut away from this,'as from other things. He was, as they knew, in favour of the introduction oE the Bible into the schools.-("Oh.") The exclusion of the Bible was an outrage on the feelings ot the people, and he hoped that those who were with him iv this matter would yet get that rectified. He know that Dr Fitchett had said that if the Bible were brought into the schools they must give Catholics a grant. Why not? He had not yet heard any good reason against it. The late Mr Macaudrew, Dr Slilart, and many others who had bestowed thought on the subject svere iv favour of it, ou the ground that it would strengthen the system of education by removing a cause of difficulty. These were the main points in his programme; but he would like to say that, though ho had beeu well received by the body of the electors, some had made all sorts of statements behind his back, mainly in respect to dummyism. Thero was r.o truth in ar.y ol these aspersions. He had nothing to cr.ueeal.anil did not dread being detected ; and would ask those whom he had ride-red to to wv to bis meetings and h-.r-.i- -a-:.a! he. Ju;_ lo r.riy. Tucro was one thing he never did and never would do, and that was to address the working men as though they were a separate class. He addressed all alike as electors, and would always discountenance any attempt to divide this democratic community into sections. There was oue more subject to which he would allude. Thi gentleman who sreonded Dr Fitcliett's nomination had let the cat out of the bag when he sail that Dr Fitchett was a strong supporter of the present Government—that was of Sir Julius Vogel—through thick and thin. He (Mr Cargill) had never traduced Sir Julius Vogel; and as for Sir Robert Stout, he said that we could not do without him, for he was a strong Southern man and we could not afford to be handed over to the North. But tho Government had distinctly thrown him overboard in favour of tbeir thick-aud-thiu supporter. He (Mr Cargill) would not, however, offer factious opposition to the Government; but at the same time he must go up to Wellington, if he went there at all, with clean bauds aud liberty to do as he thought best. Dr Fitchett,who was received with prolonged applause, said that he would not speak for more than three minutes. He would merely say that he felt the responsibility of contesting this election, and if they returned him he would do all in his power to warrant the confidence placed iv him. With Mr Cargill, he held that economy iii the public service was essential, and that this was not a question of party or of Government, but a question for the whole colony. But coordinate with economy was the necessity for building up aud strengthening by a policy of Protection. There were two ways of remedying the evils under which we were labouring: The one was by economising to tbe utmost, and starving ourselves; the other by enabling the men now iv the colony to stop here and prosper. Mr Cargill asserted that he was a Protectionist. If this was so, he had concealed the fact with great success. But there were Protectionists and Protectionists. He (Dr Fitchett) put Protection in the front window of his shop, as the first thing he wanted; others might be Protectionists as well,and put it down the cellar. The Government depended on Protection, aud if they had to go out they would go out on Protection. If the people wanted Protection, they were absolutely bound to support the present Government. He was a strong party man, aud would not sit on a rail, but would support the Government — not to be their bond slave, but to assist them iv furthering the good of the country. Another reason he had for supporting the Government was that he had great respect for Sir Robert Stout, whose high character was well known, and yet he was subjected to all sorts of personal abuse. Further, it was an Ofcago Government, and it was a scandal that the friends of its own house should bo the first to turn and rend it. It was a popular Government up Northland yet strange to say hounded down where it might have reasonably looked for the most support. All who believed that thu welfare of this colony

was bound up with Protection must support this Government. Mr Cargill had spoken of the Bible in schools and of the Catholic claims; but here again he was unfortunate, for at the last election in which he took part he had said that, to grant aid to the Catholics would upset the present sy.stc-Ei. Mr Cahoill : Mr Cargill never said anything of the kind.

Dr Fitchett : Well, I am going to address a meeting on Saturday, and at that meeting I shall quote the Daily Times on the point—question and answer.—(Applause.) The show of bauds resulted largely in favour of Dr Fitchetf, hy more than two to one. Mr J. B. Thomson demanded a poll on behalf of Mr Cargill.

WELLINGTON. WKI.LINUTON EAST.

Messrs G. Fisher, Robertson, and Carter were proposed. The show of hands was largely in favour of Mr Fisher. The proceedings were noisy, but good-tempered. WAIItAUAI'A. Messrs W. C. Buchanan and Henry Bunny were proposed. The show of hands was: Buchanan, 308; Bunny, 150. wanganui. The Hon. J. Ballance and Mr Carson were proposed. Thu show of hands was very greatly in favour of Mr Ballance. AUCKLAND. PONSONBY. The show of hands was.- Mr Wright, 78; Mr Peacock, 07 ; Mr Connor, i!ti.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18870921.2.15

Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS, Otago Daily Times, Issue 7982, 21 September 1887

Word Count
7,573

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS Otago Daily Times, Issue 7982, 21 September 1887

Working