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SALS OF LORD FALMOUTH'S RACING STUD.

"Robin Hood," the English racing correspondent of tha Australasian, sends particulars of tha second Bale of Lord Falmouth's blood stock. The two sales combined form one of the most remarkable events in tha history of the turf. Last April tho first sale realisad a total of 36,420 guineas for 24 colts and fillies, the principal of which were Harvester, subsequently one of the dead-heaters for the Derby, at 8600 guineas, and Busybody,, tho Oaks winner, for 8800 guineas. In the second sale there were 16 -yearlings, two of which brought 3000 guineas each ; 34 brood mares and their foals, the highest figures being Spinaway, winner of the' One Thousand and Oaks in 1875, 5000 guineas; Wheel of Fortune, also winner of the Ona Thousand and Oik 3in 1879, 5500 guineas; Jannette, winner of the Oaks . and St. Lager in 1878, 4200 guineas ; and Cantiniore, mother of Dutch Oven,1 4100 guineas; whilst her daughter, who won the St. Leger two years ago, fetched 3200 guineas. The five stallions included Kingcraft, winner of the memorable Derby of 1870, in which he defeated Macgregor, who started with the big odds of 9t04"0n "in a field of 15. The old horse wa3 knocked down for 500 guineas; but Galliard, winner of the Two Thousand Guineas last year, made 3600 guineas; and Fred Archer, the jockey, eecured Childeric for 1900 guineas. The total proceeds of tho second sale reached 75,440 guineas, and the grand total was the enormous aum of 111,860 guineas, or an average of nearly 1416 guineas for the 79 lots. With the above sale Viscount Falmoufch severs Jjis connection with tho British turf, a connection that, from the commencement'of his career in 1857, under the assumed name of "Mr T. Valentine," has been attended with round upon round of successes, coupled with the most honourable dealings. It has long beon known that the head of the Boscawens never associated gambling with racing, he baing content to breed horses and run .them for tha pure love of the Bport alone. The following quotation from a London sporting periodical of last year comes very appositely: " The strong point we have to dwell upon is his straightforwardness and rectitude of conduct. During his long connection with the turf he has not been allied with any betting man; ignorant of the Btato of the odds about his animals, he waits for no telegrams from Tattorsalls or the clubs before he can tell his friends if his horses will run. When they do start there is no Lord Burleigh mystery about their quality, but ho lats the public know as much about them as himself, being content with the spoils of war," and the pleasure to be derived from the victory. To approach Lord Falmouth with a proposition of not standing in his way in one race for a reciprocal obligation in another would be impossible for the most barefaced adventurer. Neither would alf the money in the Bank of England tempt him to sell a horse on the eve of a great race, so thoroughly imbued is he with the knowledge that the honest portion of the sporting world look up to the aristocracy for the protection without which tho turf would soon go to decay." . ■ .. Lord Falmouth's pencJiant has been the groat olassic or weight-for-age races, handicaps being a very minor consideration with him. Sufficient is it to record that he has won tho Derby twice, the Oaks four times, the St. Lager thrice, the Two Thousand Guineas thrice, and the One Thousand Guineas four times. And most of these successes have baen achieved by horses bred by himself, and with the assistance of Fred. Archer, whose score this season bids fair to excel any former year, as up to June 27 he had ridden 116 winners out of 250 mounts, at a minimum weight of Bat 71b.. Up to the end of last season he had piloted 2089 winners.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18840823.2.39.25

Bibliographic details

SALS OF LORD FALMOUTH'S RACING STUD., Otago Daily Times, Issue 7027, 23 August 1884, Supplement

Word Count
766

SALS OF LORD FALMOUTH'S RACING STUD. Otago Daily Times, Issue 7027, 23 August 1884, Supplement

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