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AUSTRALIAN,

Progress is advertised to stand at the small fee of 10 guineas.

There is quite a story (writes "Augur") connected with Hailstorm, who won the Steeplechase on July 1. Some time ago he injured one of his knees so badly that it had to bo fired, and the horse was turned out. He was not long in the paddock before ho was stolen, and as no trace of him could be discovered his owner despaired of ever seeing him again. A short time ago, however, Mr C. Glasscopk, who knew the horse well, recognised him between the shafts of a Simpson's road cab, and at once telegraphed to his owner, who came to town and immediately identified the old grey. The cabman, on being interrogated, proved that he had bought the horse from another cabman^ who had obtained the horse from somebody else. Mr Neil at once took legal proceedings to recover, and brought Mr Glasscock, the veterinary surgeon who had fired the horse, and others to prove that he wa3 Mr Neil's property. Onthe othor side there was some very hard swearing, one individual declaring that be had owned the horse for three years, and bringing forward a blacksmith who swore that he had shod the grey for him for at least two year 3 ; but in face of these statements^ the order of the Court was that tho horse should be delivered to Mr Neil, who placed him in Cripps' hands, and he scored his first win on Tuesday. Previous to the.Bendigo meeting he was sold to Mr Gard for £70, but not to be delivered until after the Grand National meeting ; and as he is a splendid fencer, he is certainly very cheap at the meney. Hastings and Morceau are in most favour for the Hawkesbury Grand Handicap at 500 to 25 and 500 to 20 respectively. 1000 to 50 is offered on the field for the Great Metropolitan Stakes, and 1000 to 40 on the field for the Melbourne Cup.

Mr Barnard telegraphed to Melbourne scratching Dirk Hatteraick for the Melbourne Cup directly he received a wire announcing the colt's weight.

Since the repeal of the totalisator tho Committee of the South Australian Jockey Club have held a meeting and decided that they will not take the responsibility of issuing any further programmes without the consent of the members of the Club. An extraordinary meeting has accordingly been called, at which members will be asked to discuss the advisability of endeavouring to continue racing without the use of the machine. The S.A.J.C. now owe £1200, which sum has been presonally guaranteed by members of the Committee.

A jockey named Ashton, who had been in the employ of the Hon. W. Pearson pretty well all his life, met with a fatal accident while schooling a horse named Molrow, at Sale, a few days ago. The horse fell on the poor fellow, and crushed him so severely that he died in the hospital on the following day.

ENGLISH AND FOREIGN.

The Duchess of* Montrose, who races under the name of "Mr Manton," has given Fred Archer a lump sum of £6000 to have the fourth call upon his services as a jockey, his first three masters being the Duko of Portland, Lord Hastings, and the Duke of Westminster.

In the race for the Breeders' Produce Stakes at Kempton Park recently, Archer, on Necromancer, got greatly the best of the start and won, without being approached, by four lengths ; but after the race Baron Hirsch and Mr Chaplin lodged an objection to the race on the ground of there having been a flying start. The matter was not decided for a fortnight, when tho objection was overruled, and Necromancer's victory was confirmed. Tom Cannon on his return to the paddock, after the race, remarked that, "if this sort of thing is going to be allowed we may as well allow Archer to walk over." Such words as these from a jockey of Cannon's experience and integgity are well worth hoeding, and there is little doubt that Archer's ability has enabled him to do pretty well as he likes, and jockeys, starters, and officials generally seem afraid or unwilling to say him nay. Rosy Morn, winner of the Woodcote Stakes, was bought for 2000 guineas, as a yearling, at Mr Chaplin's sale.

At Windsor meeting Archer rode in seven races and won five of them in succession.

The Sporting and Dramatic News received by the last mail contains a splendid portrait of old George Fordham, one of the straightest and best of England's jockeys. In the same number there is an account of an interview with the veteran horseman. In answer to a question as to what he thought about the boys nowadays, Fordham replied:—" Well, of course the young 'uns lose their heads when it comes to a finish, but so do the old ones, too, very often. They begin too soon nowadays. They get to be jockey 3 all at once; I mean they are put up to ride a horse, and_ he carries them home, and then they don't win when it comes to real racing, and you hear about their ' bad luck.' It isn't bad luck, it's because they don't know how to ride—haven't learnt. I didn't become a jockey all at once, and in my young days we used to ride heats, which was good practice. There's a Bible and Testament I had given me for riding Little David; that and a gold-mounted whip, with ' Honestyi s the best policy' on it. That's what was given me for winning. . . . Boys whip a horse a mile from homo. Sometimes, as we've been going in a race, I've seen them begin, and I've said to them, ' how the deuce do you expect to get home if you're whipping him now ?' . . It's no use knocking the young ones about; I never did it, you know. . . . If I hit a horse once and ho does not answer, I stop. There's a chance of the others stopping and coming back to you, perhaps, but it is no good flogging away at him." The Brazilians have now their race meetings, and they have a delightful arrangement for betting. The professional betters are locked up in a large building with grated windows at intervals, at which they bet with the public, giving tickets to record the transaction and attest the receipt of the money ; when the race is over the winners repair to another window, and on presenting their ticket they are paid their winnings. When all is over the betters are let out. How would our pencillers like this?

Archer crossed the Channel to ride Archiduc in the French Derby, as did Cannon to steer Little Duck (who subsequently won the Grand Prix de Paris). Archiduc was made a great favourite at 11 to 4 on. Fra Diavolo being second in the list at 9 to 2, while Little Duck was afforded lukewarm support at 100 to 7. The uncertainty of the turf was again manifested, for Archiduc could make no fight with Little Duck when challenged at the distanca, and Archer had all his work to do to gain the second place from Fra Diavolo, which he just accomplished by a neck. Cannon was loudly cheered when returning to weigh in. Mr Baird, who paid the large sum of £SBOO for the three year-old filly Busybody at Lord Falmouth's sale, is said to be enormously wealthy, and will at the age of 25 have something like the trifle of £250,000 a year coming in.

Barcaldine, who was about the best horse in England a short time ago, has turned "savage," but, under the treatment of the great German horsetamer, Lofflar, his temper has greatly improved. Until Loftier took him in hand he was altogether unmanageable. Bell's Life waa not fortunate in its prognostications as to tho Derby, four of its writers giving tips which were all a long way out. 'Bleys" went for Queen Adelaide; another for Talisman 1, St. Medard 2, Beauchamp o ; another for Queen Adelaide, Talisman, St. Medard, and Loch Ranza ; and tho fourth for Queen Adelaide, Talisman, and Richmond. The Sportsman camo out much better, going for Talisman, Harvester, and St. Gatien. The field also went pretty near the mark, choosing Queen Adelaide, Loch R>nza, and Harvester. Land and Water went for Queen Adelaide, Talisman, and Harvester. For the Oaks pretty well all the papers plumped for Busybody. Up to May 30, the figures of the leading jockeys were as under :— Mounts. L-»t. Won. Archer, F ~ 159 90 69 Loaiea, S .. 143 111 32 Wood, O ..137 1"5 S2 Watts, J ..73 52 21 Wocdburn, J ~ Si 65 17 Cannon, T ..43 23 15 OsbMiieJ ..48 S4 14 It will be seen that Atcher has far distanced his competitors, and that Wood has been tied by S. Loates, who rode' Harvester in the Derby. Inquiries are frequently made as to when George Fordham was born, and answers have been given not stridtly in accordance with fact. For those interested we (Sportsman) give a copy of the certificate of his birth :—" Page 6 —1837, Births in the district of St. Andrew the Great, in the town of Cambridge, in the county of Cambridge. When and where born, September 2-1, Holy Trinity ; name George; name and surname of father, James Fordham ; namo and maiden surname of mother, Amelia Fordham, formerly Wing; rank and profession of fathor, groom; when registered, October 18. Signature of Registrar, Samuel Knowles." It may therefore bo taken for granted that George Fordham was born on September 2-1, 1537. Four days before tho Derby a report stated that Harvester had gone lame, and ho spoedily receded in tho betting market until the day preceding the race he stood at 33 to 1 offered.

—As soon as a fire breaks out in Valparaiso the proprietor, manager, or head man is arrested and lodged in safe keeping until the authorities are satisfied it was accidental. This often causes great inconvenience, but on the whole it undoubtedly has beneficial results.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18840719.2.43.21

Bibliographic details

AUSTRALIAN,, Otago Daily Times, Issue 6997, 19 July 1884, Supplement

Word Count
1,683

AUSTRALIAN, Otago Daily Times, Issue 6997, 19 July 1884, Supplement

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