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THE GENERAL ELECTION

The polling for the election of a representative in Parliament for oich of the four wards of the city, and for Roslyn and the Peninsula, took place yesterday, and, a.s was generally anticipated, there was a good deal of bustle and excitement. Tlie streets, however, did not afford the busy spectacle generally to be witnessed on election days in the past. The vehicle traffic was not much greater than usual, . owing to no hired cabs being used by the candi'.dates, although traps belonging to a few of the supporters of some of tiie candidates were tr* lie seen conveying electors to the pollingbooths. As will be seen from tlie subjoined accounts of the declarations of the results of tlie polling, the competition in some of the contests was exceptionally close. When the numbers ou the electoral roll are considered, it will be found, too, that a very large number indeeil of those possessing votes recorded them, and this fact would imply that the candidates' committees must have worked hard to bring the eleotors to the pollingbooths. The number of formal votes recorded, together with the number of doctors on each of the rolls, are as under :— Votes Voters on recorded. Roll. Dunedln Central .. .. 1042 154-1 Dunedin South .. .. SIS 1220 Dunedin East .. .. 957 1300 Dunedin Weat .. ..910 1380 Roslyn .. .. 90!) 1212 Peninsula .. .. 839 1110 DUNEDIN CENTRAL. About a quarter past 7 the Returning-officer appeared at tlie Garrison Hall window and announced to a large number of the public tho following result: — Bracken .. .. ..340 Carifill .. .. ..320 Hastings .. .. ..203 Dickson .. .. ..70 Graham .. .. ..43 Mr Bracken, in returning thanks to the electors, said there were occasions when a man could not find words to express his thoughts. This was one of those occasions. He had fought this battle fairly and honourably. He had arrayed against him moneyed men—men who employed cabs, carriages, and paid canvassers. He had no paid canvassers, but he had a brave band of honest working men, who thought tliat ho was the best representative of the ( working classes and tradesmen of Dunedin. — (" So you are.") From the bottom of his heart , he thanked them, and he pledged himself to ] use his utmost endeavours to further the in- , terests of New Zealand and of this city in ] particular. He was lied to no party; he . would bo the slave of no clique. He would ; work for all classes —for justice to all classes. , From tho bottom of his heart he thanked £ them for the high honour thoy had done him , in placing him at the head of the poll for the , premier constituency of New Zealand.— \ (Cheers.) He would ask those present to give , a fair hearing to Mr Cargill, who was a gentle- f man, although he was iin the wrong side. 1 Mr Cargill, who was received with cheers ] and some hostile noises, said that the electors , had placed him in a very honourable position ,* on the poll, as ho was within 20 of the winning ] man. He was exceedingly "grateful to his fel t low citizens who had taken so'hiuch trouble to c secure his election. He was sorry that Mr ] Bracken should have made any reference to , paid canvassers. For his part, he had no paid }. canvassers, and did not go beyond what the f law pennited.—("Oh! oh!") Those who said \ " oil " must be incapable of understanding the s class of men who had been supporting him. 1 His committee was composed of working men. j —("Oh, oh!") Those 111011 who were scream- f ing out were not working men. He supposed 0 tliey must be disappointed swells. —(" Oh !") s The person in front of him crying out "oh" } was a nice fellow, whose face showed what he s was. He wished to say that his committee j were working men, and with two or three ] exceptions vvero- moir who worked with j their hands. He did not kno\v how suf- c fieiently to express thanks for the great pains :l they had taken, and tho honest and hearty *] efforts they had made to secure his election, j. Ho had not come before the citizens with any t party cry, or with any got-up idoas 'to 'cateli c the {lopular breath.' " He had • honustly put be- ,1 fore thorn his views, and lie was happy in hay- j.

ing received a response to the views he entertained from such a large body of the citizens as to place him within 20 of the man who was successful. Mr Bastings said there were two tilings necessary for a man to bear —one was victory, tlie other was defeat; and he trusted he equld bear defeat as a game man should. He could only say that he fought this election on principle, in the interests of tho people of tho country. He did not regret personally that Mr Bracken was returned, because he was a gentleman with whom lie hold iv common most of tlie principles he advocated. He felt when Mr Bracken came into the fietc) wjl'p) l|ijj personal popularity, and seeing tljo'nianuoi' in whi.?!' he was id'ohtifiedwith every popular movement ill town, that ho had a vory formidable antagonist, and that with the consequent splitting of votes it would be a Herculean task to win. Although defeated, he trusted he -was not disgraced by tho position ho stood in ; and there would-be many othuropportiinifcios, He believed he could refer with somo pride to his past career as a public man, and tho time might come when he wouid again ask them to return him to a position which ho had endeavoured to fill honourably to himself and satisfactorily to those he represented. So far as his committee were concerned, he thanked them, for they did all they could to return him ; and he did all he could himself, Ho thought all the candidates, did thnt, Ife thanked those who lihldly everted thoinsolves in his behalf, and regretted that lie had not been victorious. He felt satisfied, however, with tho man thoy had elected,.because he was sure Mr Bracken would do credit to them. Mr Bracken said that although Mr Dickson was defeated, he believed ho was as straight* forward and honest a man as any j|| tfjo CfiH): niuiiitj:. He trns(,ei| tlliiji Wfa\\ii\ give l)ini a patient hearing; :nid lie was sifro'that at a future time ho would make his mark in the community. Mr Dickson, who was well received, Sjajd that to-day the voice of tho doctors of Olty Central had spoken, and ho was porfuatly woll satisfied with tho result. Ho had no 'doubt thoy had elected the candidate most worthy of then- confidence. As for himself, ho had been simply feeling tlio pulse of tho body politic j and although low on the poll to-day, lie trusted oil a future occasion to be put at the top. Certainly ho was not well known, but he would endeavour to mako himself bettor known In future ; and he could say n.n\y that piine knew himtothoirlosanvsoriTiw, Ife wished intake'this opportunity of thanking tlio Press, tho ojoiitm-s, and the candidates for their aourtosy and fell*, play, He wlshor] ospocially to thank bin enmniittoe and the 70 electors who had voted for him, considering that they bore all tho expense, and that ho simply stood on his merits.— (Cheers.) Mr GltAHAir, who was received with n HTPfil* deal of noise, said that for over i* Xv'.rs. ho had been iv. thp orivmfy, tpid dunng'that tinip W'TlliyM ferd'iiftlie interests, qf tho niajspf! the people* Scejng tlio position in which they, htldijlliiced llhli mi tlio present occasion, thoy! would havo to put thomselves In other hands in | future. He would not trouble them any more. IIf they could get any person who would ostiih- • lisli the eight-hours systoit), (Vi\d \\\\t :|«lfl. person-i on tin? mil, t-hpy ninst'either do it, thoniHelviia or got .soiqeniie else to dn it. They! would not get him to do it.—(Cheers,) Thej groat bulk of tho people had insulted him by I* the manlier in whioh thoy had voted, There- j fore he would do nothing further for them In j future it On the motion of Mr Bracken, soconded by Mr-Bastinos, a vote *of thanks was passed to, i Mr Ure for the impartial maniierin which l|g*'g Ua. oonduc'ted the1 olsctwn" j a"iiA i'i^ P-r^'^H-'.'i ifltfiS plosgd tyl.th jliree pl}Gcjsj ffll) Mr T^'ackCii, * j DUNEDIN SOUTH. *c The declaration of tho poll for Dunodin h South took place iibout 7.40 p.m. at Winter's d storo, Stafford streot, iv the presence of about' o 500 persons. " b The Retubsiko-offioer (Mr J, Taylor) au-_w ..-..-.' ' ' V*.,,.. ~r ■

nounced the following to be the state of the poll :— Fish .. .. .. 665 Ross .. .. ..283 Informal .. .. ..7

Majority for Fish ..282 ; Mr Fish, in .addressing those present, thanked them for electing him to the proud position they had. He said lie had had no doubt as to what the result of the election would be, but confessed tliat from tlie start he did not suppose- that his opponent would get such a crushing defeat.—(Applause.) On the day of the nomination lie was inclined to feel some grief through meeting with opposition at the last hour, but seeing the result of the election, he was glad and proud that an opponent had come into tlie field, because it was now demonstrated beyond the shadow of a doubt that he had the confidence of the electoral district of Dunedin South. It he had iiad no opponent, it would havo been said by those gentlemen who were always having a fling at his poor self that he got in by a fluke and by chicanery.- The magnificent result would stop any talk of that kind. In the hour of success one could afford to be generous, and therefore he would say nothing about his opponent, except to thank him for the gentlemanly manner in which he had conducted the contest. He was more glad on the occasion, not so much for defeating Mr Ross, as some other person who would feel the defeat far more than Mr Ross. He did not intend to name that gentleman, as tliey all knew whom he referred to—(A Voice: "Walter.") He would not detain them any further, but simply thank his voters for their generous support. It was a remarkable thing that he had poiled nearly all the votes hehad calculated upon. Ho would again thank his committee and supporters for the kindness they had shown towards him, and for the hearty manner in which they had worked for him. —(Applause.) The official declaration of the poll would take place on Monday, and probably he would address a few remarks to the electors on that occasion. In conclusion, ho wouid promise to use his best endeavours to represent them in such a manner as would be creditable to himself and no disgrace to those who had elected him. He trusted that in three years, time—if he lived so long—tliey would say lie had deserved tlie election, and that they would see fit to re-elect him.—(Applause.)

Mr Ross was received with marks of disapprobation. Mr Fisn : Gentlemen, I beg of you to give Mr Ross as quiet a hearing as you havo dono to myself. Mr Ross said he thought it ill became a crowd of British men to be less generously disposed than the successful candidate. He never expected to win the election.—(Cries of "Oh!") He thanked the 252 independent electors who had recorded their votes in his favour.—(A Voice : The others aro not independent, I suppose.) He had discharged what he conceived a public duty by coming forward. The electors had given no uncertain answer, and he was quite satisfied with the result. Ho never exhibited ill-feeling at the close of an election, aud lie would not do so on that occasion. He could take a defeat as nicely as any man in the world. As Mr Fish had said, from that timo forward the electors wouid depend upon him to do what lie had promised, and if at tlie close of the three years for which he had been elected lie satisfied them, it would be their bounden duty to return him again. He (Mr Koss) had had no feeling in the matter. He thanked the voters who had voted in his favour, and those who had voted in Mr Fish's favour, for behaving in the generous manner they had done towards him. He would say no more beyond expressing a hopo that tlie elected of Dunedin South would perform his duties satisfactorily. He begged leave to move a vote of thanks to the Returning-officer. Mi* Fish : I beg to second that.

The Returnin'o-ofkicer: All further proceedings are adjourned till Monday, when the official declaration of the poll will take place. Mr Fish was then carried shoulder-high, amid the cheers of the crowd assembled, to the bottom of Stafford street. There he was allowed to resume the use of his legs, but he was followed down Princes street by a large number of people. On reaching the door of his warehouse, Mr Flsh shortly addressed his enthusiastic supporters, asking them to allow him to retire to His office to attend to his private business, which had lately, through the election, been somewhat neglected. He was j very tired, and he supposed they were in a similar state. After thanking them for tlie hearty manner in which they had worked for him, ho bade them " Good night," and God bless them,

DUNEDIN EAST.

At about a quarter-past 7 o'clock tho Return-ing-officer (Mr A. Stowait) announced the result of the poll to an audience of upwards of a thousand electors. The result of tho poll was as follows:— North-East I'll ion st Valley. School. Tl. JI. Vf. (Irecn ..* (il 42*3 487 J. U. Davis .. -113 22 4;0

Majority for Green .. 17 Mr Stewart, the retm-ning-officer, then declared Mr Green duly elected. Mr Green, who was received with loiul cheers, said he felt that, although tlie majority by whicli he had been elected was not very large, yet considering the influences tliat had been at work against them, and tlie almost superhuman efforts that had boon made by the Star and Times—(groans),—by a Church of England minister—(groans),—i*y the University professors and students, he thought the result was most highly to the credit of tlie working men of Dunedin, as showing that thoy were not only capable of exercising judgment for themselves, but that they would resist all undue influences that might be brought to boar upon them.—(Loud applause.) He would have had much more sympathy with' his opponent in his defeat if he (Mr. Davis) had resorted only to those'courses Which .were in harmony with tlie spirit as well as the letter of the Corrupt Practices Act. —(A Voice : So he did). He was sorry to say that if his opponent had been elected, lie had violated before witnesses an Act of Parliament, and would have been ousted.—(Hear, hear.) He (Mr Davis) had been known to pay for cabs for bringing voters to the poll, and had thus rendered himself disqualified for a seat in the Kew Zealand ■ Parliament for five years to come. —(Applause.) He regretted to have to say this of liis defeated foe, but he (Mr Green) loved fairplay, and as everyone present knew, he had not asked a single individual to vote for liim—ho had believed they were capable of. judging for themselves, and felt that ho'"occupied a proud position as their representative, for lie had not lifted a finger to influence the election, excepting by his public addresses. He had been;; charged by tho Times with using grp£is jiersonalities and with misrepreseutiiig his opponent. To that charge he pleaded not guilty, He would say that he was tile last porson ill the world to'indiilgb in personalities.—(" Oh, oh !" and cheers.) Ho would fight for a principle as long as ho had breath, but if a man began personalities against him, lie would find him able to

- cope in that respect. At his second meeting * his opponent had used personalities tha.t leg > the electors to hiss, and it had only, been iv self-defence that he had rofe^red $«Mr Dftvjs. *Mr Davis: A,\ Ti!l Mr''G-roen repeat those I personalities? Mi*"<7*ri*;i*:N: Yes. One of the. personalities * was that Mr Davis termed him (Mr Green), -religiously, a " Campbellite ;" another perso- ■ nality was insinuating that he (Mr Green^ had i originated the debate with Bright pi the 1 purpose of popularity. •• <'""- ---! Mi- Da\ ii,; Never/never ! ' Air Glihlii's': Mr Davis dented it, and lie (Mr ! Green) die) not hear Mr Davis. It had been 1 so reported to him, and if it was not true he I was thankful. He did not want to know that ■ Mr Davis had gone beyond what was right, I and regretted that anything nf j\ per-sdiial * character should. Iryo been introduced into the matter,-..("0h, oli!" and applause.) Thoso who ) hail attended his (Ah* Green's) meetings knew 1 thnt he had spoken most kindly and re- : spectfully of his opponent,—(Yes.) Tliat lie ' had endeavoured in no way to misrepresent | him, and had pleaded that they should conduct the contest as gentlemen and Christians, Imt I that lie had had to defend hiiiix^f Sftviu, the ■■ .statements whicli were (•.ium.lat^a.' "wj'tli re--1 gai-d to the stiil.-ioeiit in'the Times, ho mild i tliat- «* si'.o.ti as luV li'ad iisml the* word "lie" 'at luS incetiiig, ] m f o ]j: | t WilH n little too ' strong; but it was not incorrect—it was i the truth, for lying was the making of *a _ statement with tho intention to do- * ceivo, aud he was certain that the ii^pni tion on the part of the editor \u v s lo ileeeivo.— (Hear, hear.)/ And the, iii\d'shown that i that staton^nu \v-i\S' nut o*,..iu'-oet,, However, he : V.f.W «li<l!<!g!iiPq for- using the word "lie"in- : sitcfid (if "untruth." y 0 could not apologise for auji'thiug else. The course whicli the Star 1 and limes had pursued must bring on tliein 1 tho reprobation of i*ight,-(.liiyiking men. The Star on Thursday night had sought to degrade llini in the estimation of tho public by Insinuat- ' ing that he had supported tlio Horry Govorn--1 ment in a most wicked mid dastardly act. If ; thoy had only mado tho chargo ono night beforo, ho would have given thorn most conclusive ovidonce that lie was pursuing to-day, in defence of the working men, tin; jiftnio. course that lie had pursued ill J\toJbqurn'e six years ago, ai**| \]\a 'uc\v\isa which, God holnir.s? him, ]m W'\\M always stiiyo'tn jmiwe.—(Applaqsu.) .lie would jihiml for equal right and equal justifio fiiy" iW*ty man, be he squatter, ni'oi'dhaiic, oi* working map, and would be in favour of no unfairness to any man, no matter what might be his position, if he knew it.— (Continued applause.) Ife did not wish tn «i\y. ono word further that would «,(, *\\ reflet* upon the way in which the. cosiest, had been carried m\ \ 1$ fejt 'that, a viot**r shoidd l*e f;<-my,roi|s, imd ho wished to be so. 4-fe itWeY!>rV Vf-pri tinted with his whole heart t'i(b cqurso whioh hud been pursued, and would say thul*. If It hail not been for tho unfair means Jiii'rsiiiMl, tho majority instead of being 17 would .have beun 170.—('Applause) He thanked them jfor tlie honourable position in whit'h (hoy l\ad .placed him, and said thftt |*|s whole energies I would bo diivotoi! M the advancement of tlinJv Wolfipo. : (l^niid applause.) , Mr OiiTox Davis, wil,1, waa yccoivod with .oxclipiiivtioiis of disapproval and oheora, aaid if Itinise preiieut would listen ho would only koop tbem a few mlnntos,-™(A Voice: Take oif your gloves.) It was in a very gentlo way he had fought the contest—ho had fought it with gloved hands. Mr Green had chosen til m.iko three distinct charges against him. Tho first wis that he had, !*irad e_ cab qy- cabs.—(A Voickv Soymi did,); Tfe cab was not in his jiat'Vtpei.—(Mr Qbeiljj : Yon'wore seen to pay foils.), ,(A VotOßi'-Sneak tho'tr'uth.) He''(Mr 1-IftYIS would speak the truth. Mr Greoii said Ijljirt he had boi-rowed money te'piu-'M tho sab, Ho ltn.cl borrowed' money,: and had laudod it to 4 neighbour ; wl, a ;t that noighbour lid with tt hodidnot kn*»v. ( HOh,'oh!") KowiVßy, Mi* Green said it mad-a hiih (Mr Davis), table to live years' disqualification/ and' ft vould bo possible therefore to elucidate1 tliat

matter without difficulty. Again Mr Grcei had charged him over and over again with per Bonalities. He had asked Mi* Green to-day to say what those personalities were. Mr Green said tliat, at tho Drillshed meeting, he (ilr ; Davis) stated that Mr Green undertook the debate with Mr Bright for the purpose of ob- * tabling popularity, lie denied that lie ever said so. Again Mr Green said that lie slan doied —not slandered him, but called him a bad name.—(A Voice: So you did.) That also lie denied; for the word was used by him, but it was not applied to Mr Green as a ipersonality.—("Oh, oh!") Ho had no nioi-e intention of offending that gentleman by speaking ot tlie Christian Disciples (as they wero more commonly known) as Gair.pbellites than he had when he spolce cf another sect a« W esleyans. 1 f one was a slander the other was too, and he hoped tho Wesleyans would understand that.—(Hear, hear.) Now he had done with Mr Green for tlie present. —(A Voice : How about the £125 ?) His questioner know more about that than he did. He had now simply to say that he was not delighted at the result of tliis election.—(A Voice: That is true.) He did not mind saying that he was greatly disappointed. He was honest enough to say that he looked upon it as a great disappointment. But he owed great thanks for| their heartiness and co-operation to the many gentlemen who formed his committee, and to the many gentlemen who had polled for him. Possibly the time might come when it would be his proud honour to stand tliere and speak first instead of second. A vote of thanks to the Returning-officer concluded the proceedings. DUNEDIN WEST. A large crowd assembled outside the OddFellows' Hall, Albany street, at about halfpast 0 o'clock last evening, and waited with increasing impatience until 7.20 for tlie result of the polling. At that time the doors of the building were thrown open, and those present were requested to proceed to the vacant ground at the rear of|the building, where the Result would be declared. On arrival tliere the Returning officer, who, with the candidates and their friends, occupied an embankment raised contiderably above the crowd, declared tlie numbers as follows, amidst an unbroken silence: — Dick' .. .. .. 459 Stewart .. .. ..461 Informal .. ..10 This announcement was received with loud and long-continued cheering for both candidates, amidst which The Returning-officer intimated that the official declaration would be made on Monday * noxt, at 12 o'clock. Mr Dick then stepped forward and said that !he wished to tender those present who had accorded him their votes his heartfelt thanks for ', the honour done him. He had to thank them 1 for a personal favour, and also for an evidence ' of their confidence in the Government of which 'he was a member. He had done at all times his utmost to advance their interests, and he * trusted they would find his zeal in the future 1 equal to what it had beon in the past. He in- ■ tended to continue Ms efforts in their behalf, and would express a hope that the Government ' would continue to receive from them the same ■ measure of support tliat had been accorded it 1 on that occasion.—(Cheers.) 1 Mr Stewart then expressed his thanks to 1 thoso gentlemen who had exerted themselves '_ to secure his return, and who, though failing ' in that, had succeeded in placing him in so con- '■ spieuous a position in the polling. It had been * a close contest, although he was free to admit that tho other sido had unfairly influenced the | poll by placing vehicles at the disposal of a number of electors. This course lie had not adopted, because he considered it a breach of the . Corrupt Practices at Elections Act.—(Cries.) He had been offered vehicles in numbers, which he had declined, wishing to have nothing to do with such expedients. If they had contested the seat without theso he would havo been at the head of the poll, as he unhesitatingly attributed his defeat to this cause. He had not entered the arena from any personal'motives, as he had rather wished to abstain from taking part in publio affairs for a year or two, but had come forward at the request of a large number of the electors. He would again thank thoso gentlemen who had worked for him, and would accept the verdict of the electors with perfect satisfaction, hoping possibly to be in a position to ask their suffrages ou a future occasion.

The defeated candidate was loudly cheered on concluding, and his successfuropponent| shook hands with him and exchanged a few words. Mr Stewart was here understood to remark that he had fought the battle fairly. The assemblage quickly dispersed at the conclusion of tlie addresses.

ROSLYN.

Tlie poll was announced shortly after 8 o'clock, the result being received with cheers. It was as follows :-- Bathgate .. .. .. 341 Si'ot.t .. .. .. 32f Ilodgkinson .. .. 2jj Majority for Bathgate, 11,

Mi* Batiioate, in returning thanks, said thn to say he was gratified with the result i tlie poll would be to use words'that wonld nt express fully his feelings on the matter. 1 was i;ot only on his own account that he fo] gratified, but for the triumph of tlie prir.c: pies that lie had advocated, and which tliey ha* endorsed as being the best fo.r the pro'gres md prosperity of the people.—(Cheers.) H had not canvassed the district; he had no isked any man for his vote; he had n i-ommitte'e — (Groans),— and yet by thei ill ff rages he had been placed fit th head of the poll.—(Cheers). Ho thanke* .hem more cordially on a^cpunt of their bein* volunteers. They had come forward spot) janeoiudy, aud ho would do all he could t* 'oi'ward thoir cause.—(Cheers.) Now that th victory had been declared, he hoped that the* ivould bury the hatchet of war and smoke tit" *ipe of peace.—(Applause.) He would, no mly endeavour to do his utmost for the 34: Sectors who supported him, by,t lie would als* york for the interests p,f avory elector in tin Roslyn district,—(Cries of "Oh!") He hai rnce moja to return them his most cordia ;hanks. He would now ask them to give thrqi learty cheers for the defeated candidates, This compliment having been dy,ly paid, Captain Scott stepped fruwd. Ho sail ie had to thank the, electors most cordial! 'or the very liberal support they liai iccorried him. He was a comparative strange iinonjjst them—(Hear, hear)—and though th ,'ictorious candidate had been iimap'ijst then or years lie (Captain Scott) lijyj pieced then io well that lie had '*,i]i]y > Pc? beaten by Irotes.—(Hear, \\ai\i\ au'd loud cheers.) Th* ■lctonous candidate had a largo family spread ng all o.y.av, the Mornington district, while In Captain Scott) had only lately arrived witl lis family from England. As to the victor* icing a triumph of principle, lie would leavl ,hat for thorn to determine.—(Hear, hear.) N* me could say but that he had acted houaurabl* ihrouglnuit the contest, and ho had oppose! lie other candidates like, ,- t gentleman. H* elt sure that if lie I,'ad again occasion to asl ;heir vo.tcw lV that district lie would not be I,'.",tes lielund, but a £ieat.dcal more than tha (head.—(Cheers.) For his own part, lie bor* 10 ill-will against anyone. He felt satisfied md more than that, lie felt grateful to the, cvm uutteo and those who had kindly supportet him on the present occasion,—(Liiiuct cheers.) Mr HoDiiKiNsox fiaiil that ho stood bofor* thorn a dofoat^d; ea'ndi'dato and at the botton °f the ppi)*; but none of tlio other candidate, had greater i\dvw*ittk'3 to fight against than hi h.a.4 It Wil* a case of uphill work from tly U^gtniilng* to the end. However, ho hai^gooc men working for him, and thoy dcs'orvod : better result than they had achieved. On tl>* principle of the d.\ proverb ho would, thougi defeated TO \}\h. occasion, probably "live t* %ht: awfcher day," when perhaps he would bi gi-:\tjfieil by a hotter result. He thought thei new member would do his best for tlie distric iand the people.—(Hear, hear.) In conclusio-n he had once more to thank them most ecpliaHi for the support they had given \\{m, "' ' ' PENINSULA i^.ECTION'. The contest bo, this district created a gooc doal of Impi-^st, Thero. were four candidate, i—namely, Mr Seaton, who was the firs who intimated his intention to stand, aiu who hud the support of the Trade? aw Labour Council, and also the Templars' blocl vote. The next who cay,;* forward was Jf: Cutten ; and the tlm-'^ *va's Mr Donnelly, whi entered tlie \^i,i, abont a fortnight ago. Mi Lewis \\^s'n*it* hoard of till the day of nomina itloifl,' Tlw result of the contest was goiiei'(\ll\ regarded as uncertain during the d«y, 1>"1 lotween 5 and G o'clock a largo number ol vorkmen from Dunodin foundries came to vote, md it was pretty certain, whatovor way thej vent, their votes oould not but tell. At rt I'clock th<> result of tho poll at Nauniann's \:\\\ was made known, and during the oveninp he results came in from tlio Peninsula, am: .'ore announced by the Returning-officer i^fol :*ws : — Seaton. Cutten. Itajuolly. Lewi-* outh lluiieilin .. 207 VSp, ' 173 11 iiil.-rson's Hay ~ __$ 'Cl It c i-otoliello/ ..' ifl- li __ 4 (i.nticlifTo. .'.' 0 li 4 25 ortb-Etlst flirbour., 19 1 ■ l 2 iiiilyuiount ..8 5 0 li 2*.*S 254 203 64 Majority for Mr Seaton, 14. Mir Seaton briefly returned fca.iAs. He ■isiu-ed them, that he would l s oep evory pledge •Inch ho hadmailp,—(;\i.\p|auso.). Mr Cutten w;ivi mi present, or if so, did not Idress tlie electors, Mi-._DoNNKLi.Ywas received with lond cheers. |c said that somo defeats were victories, and lis wns one. When ho first addressed them I South Dunedin, a few days previously, h,e as unknown to thorn, and he did not believe c had a half-dozen supporters in the district. [o had not the influence of wealth to favour is_ candidature, nor a^y- organisations or icieties to supppi't, hiiii, as wits tlio caso with ie gentl^uuii who waa returned ; and had to trust to except tho echo whicli the i.unoiation of his sentiments found in thp iilda of thoso ho had addressod.—(Appl:\i¥uv) inter these circumstances ho had, reason to * proud that so many votes woio recorded his favour. Ho beli'oACti tliat the >lieies whicli ho advocated wore tho jht. ones, and- i,f t^o gentleman whom ey had i-oVVtrne-d would support thorn strcf glyas ho would, have done,, they wouid ivo no reason to regret tho choico they had ado, Ho Jlniiiv believed in the soundness of o views which ho had placed-before them, and -d no doubt that either us tha representative that constituency or of some other he would fore long have,tho opportunity of supporting oni hi 'Parliament—(Cheers.)-, He- then, anked tho whole body, of tho electors, for-the. rdial hearing thej: gave him, in. Soutl\Jlftin7 in, and also thanked all who vojtad; for-hihi, d.concludodby.saymgUiivt.hQ owed a debt gratitude to his conynit>eo for- the generous *y,in which, thcx. s,iip.j»rtod hinun, a eandida•e commenced nodei;. great disadvantages,—, itldajuplai^e.)

BRUCE. Rutherford. Murray. Adam. * Milton ... 215 151 104 Waihola ... 27 39 0 1 Milburn ... 30 47 12 ■■ Kaitangata ... 12S IS .0 Taieri Beach 14 23 0 ' Hillend ... 10 1« 0 Lovell'sFlat 12 17 15 1 Manuka Creek 8 21 0 > Glenoi-e ... (i 28 5 , Stirling ... 74 22 10 i Wangaloa ... 17 11 2 i Glenledi ... 4 S 4 ' 551 401 IG4 * WAIKOUAITI. Green. Thompson, , Waikouaiti ... ... 72 85 : Blueskin ... ... 83 23 ' Purakanui ... ... 23 5 Wakari ... ... 55 1 v Tho return from Merton is yet to come. I MOUNT IDA. li De Lautour. Mackenzie, i- St. Bathans ... 4G 40 r Naseby ... ... 11l 131 y Cambrian ... ... 48 G 0 Kyeburn ... ... 11 32 l. Macraes ... ... 23 42 *c Hamilton ... ... 50 23 289 274 ir The returns from Serpentine and Blackstone Hill are to come in, but Mr De Lautour's return is considered tolerably safe. 1- MATAURA. £■ Mackenzie. Richardson. Thomson. , n East Gore ... 72 14 12 [t Edendale ... 12 37 6 'I Mataura ... 51 17 51 '* Pinnacle ° School ... 19 0 0 '* Wyndham... 1 75 25 3: Chatton ... 25 5 5 <j Knapdale ... 20 5 5 ie 200 153 104 n Two returns are yet to come. CLUTHA. Jowitt. Thomson. d Balclutha ... ... G2 55 * Inch-Clutha .... 11 20 Waipahi ... ..." 6 2G Owake ... ... GI 14 Puerua ... ... 32 32 II Waitepeka ... ... 15 27 t_, , t 187 174 Several returns are to come. ," WAKATIPU. :h Fergus. Thomson, M'Bride. 33 Queenstown ... 113 27 15 i e Arrow .... ... 47 162 9 . c Macetown ... 20 85 1 \. Cromwell... ... 73 41 _ f Lower Shotover ... 24 3 7 !t Bannockburn ... 83 19 _ ie Kawarau Gorge ... 14 9 it Bendigo 21 23 1 Moke Creek ... 7 8 3 Ss - 402 377 3G f. " WAITAKI. n Duncan. Reid. it Landon ... ... 5G 35 c Cave Valley ... 20 14 1- Reidston ... ... 23 13 I, Pukeuri ... ... 9 04 c Kakanui ... ... 13 20 ) Duntroon ... ... 21 8 h Livingstone... ... 35 13, 1- 177 107 MOERAKI. M'Kenzie. Williams. Murcott. 'Palmerston... 217 48 13 '" Maheno ... 49 12 "8 1 Herbert ... GO S 12 '■' Dunback ... 47 10 3 _\ Hampden ... 41 5 80 1 Waihemo ... 36 4 3 ' Shag Point ... 4 84 3 :" 454 171 122 \ TUAPEKA. v » J, O. Brown. G. P. C. Browne. Lawrence ... 169 126 Evans'Flat .... 15. 18 Havelock ... S3 63 Waitahuna Gully,,. 87 2G Wetherston.es ... 5Q 19 Tuapeka West ..... 8 n Tuapeka Flat 7 4 s; Clark's Flat ... IG 15 Waipori ... 03 24 Hue Spur ... 41 100 Tuapeka Mouth ... 33 38. 452 444 f OAMARU. t Shrimski, Hassell. 1 Oamap-* Courthouse ... 325 303 J. Oamaru North .. 31 13 ' Oamaru South ... 40 23 1 396 339 I DUNSTAN. V. Pyke. W. Fraser. * Tapanui ..... ... 67 51 Clyde ... ... CO 60 Alexandra ... ... 90 31 Roxburgh ... ... 101 . 87 Crookston ... ... 14 3 Dumobiii .„ ... 12 ig Swift Creek... ... 46 13 Blacks ... ... G7 24 Matakanui ... ... J_\ 33 Speargrass Flat ... 20 IS Moa Flat ... ... 33 54 Horseshoe Bend. ... 10 10 Beaumont ~.. „. 12 36 573 449 HOKONUI. Driver. Cowan. Finn. Gore ... 107 15 10 Riversdalo ... S3 14 4 Mandevillo ... 117 3 2 Waikaia ... 45 44 lit :Lv,msden ... 52 69 27 Dipton "... 15 47 3: Winton ... 105 91 27 524 253 92: INVERCARGILL. Feldwjck ... ... ', 771 Hatch ... ... ... 355 AWARUA. Joyce ... ... ... 52G Bam ... ... ... 249 Smith ... ... ... 104 Kinross ,„ ... ... 4S Three veMws to come. WALLACE A number qf returns ha\*<*. eomo to hand for this district, but in an miAitelligible form. The contest evidently 1-j.y toetwecai Messrs Daniel and Hirst. AUCKLAND. AUCKLAND CITY EAST, ?! SiT George Grey ... 349 J. M'Cosh Chirk ... ... 3.15 AUCKLAND CITY NORTH. T. Peacock ... ... 34G AY.L. Ree* ... ... 330 AWKI.AND. CITY WEST. J. Af. Diu-gaville ... ... 253 A. Fleming .?. ... 201 i ' IV Wa11i5.,... ... ... 119 MANUKAU. Sir G.M. O'Rorke ... .. 377 O. M'Gee ... ... 157 PARNKLL. F. J. Moss ... ... 300 R, Monk ... ... ,„ 174 J. A. Tolo ... ~, 440 Reader Wood: ... 167 THAMES. .I*. Shoehan ... ... 54(5 J. .Speigbi .... 5291 WAITESIATA. W. J. Hurst ... ... 421. .—. Alison ... 177 Eight returns to come. KRANKLVN NORTH. Major Harris ... ... 320' W. F. Buekland ... .... 302' S, li\*o ... ... .... 183' J, G. Gordon .... ..... S: Ono return to come. FRANKLYN SOUTffi. Hamlin ... ... .... 192: _ La wry ... ... .... 157 Six returns to come, BAY or ISLANDS. F. Hobbs.,. „. 525 J.. liojidton ... 294 MARSDKt?. O. Michelsen ... 245' G. E. Alderton ... 223' Nine returns to come. natvsev. Seymour Georges ... 332 — Shepard ... ... ISO H. W.Karnall ... 25 Seven returns to come. WAIPA. Whitaker.... .... . ... 395: Jackson ... -v ...- 350 Johns ... "- ... USThroe returns ta sci&Cv COapMAKDEL, Cadiiw* .... ... ■' 374 Brodie .... .... ...: 281 Mackay ... ... ... 240* Fivo returns to come, EAST COAST. M'Donald ... 40tf L,icko •-. ... LL. 370' 7 Poilter ..... ... ... 151 Gannon .... ... ... 121 Kwiseturns to.come TAURANGA.. Stewart .... ... ... 2C7 Morris - ... ... .... 229' Kelly .... ... ... 181. Nino Jieturns.fio.como. HAiWKE'S BAY.NAPIKP, Buchanan ... ... 489 M'D'ougall ... ... 187' M'Sweeney ... ...- I'l4 HAWKE'S BAYr Sutton ... ... ... 32? RusseU ... ... ....- 233*' Seven returns 0 come.

WAIPAWA. Smith ... ... - 517 Ormond - 4(' 9 Three returns to come.

TARANAKI. ■ I

EG MONT. Major Atkinson ... - '37 G. Hutchison ... •■• 4tw One return to come. TARANAKI. Colonel Trimble ... ... 120 J. Closeby ... - 21 Seven returns to come.

WELLINGTON.

THORNDON. Levin ... ... ■■ 772 Dwan ... ... •■• 228 TB ARO. Johnston... ... — 397 Shaw ... ... .- 312 Stafford ... ... - 321 CITY SOUTH, Hutchison ... ••• 471 Coffey - 390 Edwards ... ... ■•• THendry ... ... •■■ l* WAIRARAPA SOUTH. Buchanan... ... — 271 Bunny ... ... - I"* Boyes ... ... - ™2 Three returns to come. FOXTON. Wilson ... ... - 315 Izard ... 242 Buller ... 228 Russell ... - - 198 Newman ... ... — l*J7 Francis ... ... ■•• "1 Ten returns to come. WANGANUI. Watt ... ... - 397 Ballance ... ••• — 393 HUTT. Jackson ... ••• ••• 348 Mason ... •■• •■• 300 Marks ... - - f Sinclair ... ... •■• " RANGITIKEI. Steven 491 Sir W. Fox ... ... 489 WAIRARAPA NORTH. Beetham ... ... - 588 Renall ... ... - 340 Four returns to come. MARLBOROUGH. PICTON. gT Uy::: ::: ": « Three returns to come. WAIRAU. Dodson ... «4 Seymour ... ... ••• A 0 Four returns to come. NELSON. WAIMEA. Shephard... ... - 359 Richmond ... ... IJO INANGAHUA. Weston ... .- - 716 Reeves ... 5^ M'Lean ... ••• - rfl One small return to come. BULLER. O'Connor... ... - 402 Munro ... ■'•- ••• Four returns to come. WESTLAND. GREYMOUTH. Pctrie ... - — S2l j Guinness ... ••• ••• *M Throe returns to come. , KUMABA. Seddon ... - ••• '?° ; Blake ... - - 61G 1 Two returns to come. ' HOKITIKA. ; Fitzgerald - - "ji? ■ Reid 414 . Several returns to come. ' CANTERBURY. CHRISTCHURCH CITY SOUTH. Holmes ... - - £73 Anderson... - - 5W> TIMARU. TurnbuU... - - 413 Gibson ... - - x™ Partridge... ••• •■• " SELWYN. Hall «7 Lochhead... ... .. Ib 9 LYTTELTON. Allwright... .- - 259 Richardson --• ••• «° Webb ... 24° KAIAPOI. Wilson .., ... - »G_S Lee ... - '•■• syl One return to come. CHRISTCHURCH CITY NORTH. Majority for Thomson over S. P. Andrews (former member), 111.. . HEATHCOTE. , Williams ... ... - 233 Hombrook .... "• „o Fisher ... - - ni '•_ One return to come. LINCOLN. 1 O'Callaghan ... - 227 I Perriman ••■ •■■ ■ l&0 ; ST. ALBANS, ! Brown ... -• - ?81 - Wilson ... - - ! O'NeUl ... ... •• 8o , WAIMATE. Steward ... - *g§ ; Manchester ... "ft- ' Bateman ... •■- ••• 4b , Clements... -.-■ ••• , 4i Ono return to come in, but cannot aiiect iresult. GERALDINE. Postlethwaite ... — 5™ Wakefield - - 4^ Hayhurst... •■• ••• w COLERIDGE. M'Millan... - - 38G Knvs ' ••• ... 141 j-*jU^*a ... 11ft Jebsou ... - - IJb SYDENHAM. White - 6C2 Clark ... - - 103 Treadwell ... »- 111 Andrew ... — ■- '" STANMORE. Pilliet ... - - 383 •CWlishaw ••■ '"oni Flesher ... - - 301 ASHLEY. J!1 ™ - 230 Guild ... •■• — ™ Dickson ... ... - i!" CHEVIOT. M'llwraith ... - 309 Saunders... - - 66J J?endall ... - - lw GLADSTONE. j Sutter ... - go? * Fisher ... - •" Anderson... ••• ••■ '." Newton ... WAKANUI. Wason ... - - 447 Ivbss ... ... '- ii 6 *

THB NBW PARLIAMENT.

The following is a list of members returned, as fully as we are at present enabled to compile it:— AUCKLAND. Wtotov— W. Swanson* .. •• JJ W^Sto- J. Whyte* .. •• M wiSStA- W. J. Hurst' .. .. M Auckland Noiitii- T. Peacock .. .. JWkst- J. M. Dargaville .- ' East— Sir G. Grey* .. ■• " f*if\- J. A. Tole» .. •• „ v , Manukau- SirG.H.O'Rorke* Speaker Bay of Islands- F. Hobbs .. •• ">■ Thames- J. Sheehan* ... -- " ttoiixuv— Seymour George* •• ° TARANAKI. Fomont— Hon. Major Atkinson" .. M T-mia'saki— •* Colonel Trimble* .. M HAWKE'S BAT. Napier— Joins Buchanan .. 0 WELLINGTON. Rj\-oraKEi— John Steven ~ .. 1 mlvTwatu- Hon. W. Johnston* „ M WAITOTAIA- "o"' r J; v ß^ CG*" " M Wanganui- W'"'Watt " " o -non- ?'?\ cliTn " " 5 Tv aro— C. Johnston .. .. Ai THOKsnoN- W.H-Levin* .. M Wkllinoton South-**'. Hutchison .. U Waibarava Nortu-G. Beetiuun* .. .. M NELSON. VvraoN- A. 11. Levestam* .- 0 WaimA- J. Shephard* ~ O WAIUKA _ „ Weston" .- M INANOAIIUA — A- a. nesioii "* CANfBRCURY. CliEVio-*- H.M'lwr«.ttJi,. •• M Asiuky- W.F. I'earsow •• ° Kaiai*oi- Isaac Wilson ... ■■ M w,t-- Hon- w- Bolloiton' „ M a MM »- **'"':: 8 OiIRIKSTCHUROII Q SOUTH-John Holmes ... « Heathcote- Wynn Williams ~ M Sydenham- W'}T, hlt? M ." " * •Lyttelton- H. Allwright ... Lincoln- A. P- O'Callaghan .. M Akaroa- W. Montgomery* .. " i-klwyn- Hon. John Hall* •• JJ C leriiws— D. M'Millan •-■ "J Asuburtox- E.G. Wright •-• *J Wakasoi— J. CWason ... •• JJ •«eral»ink- W. Postlethwaito . .., fi] U'imaru— ».-Curnbull ... .-.- <* ■Gladstone— Captain Sutter .... J Waimate- W. J. Steward.. ■• .-1 OTAOO. Dcskdis EAar— 3*l. W. Green .. .. & DUNKIUN Wkot— Jlon. T. Dink* .. .... M „ Central— T. Braekou ... .. O ~ Soutu- if.;S. Fiah .. ..I Waitaki- A. 3f. Duncan .. ... 0 -Oamaru- S. E. BJirniißki* .. 0 Moeraki- ,il. M'Kenae ... ... I Waikouaiti- Hair.es Green ~ .. II Port Chalmers- J- Macandrew- .... O Roslyn- John Bathgate ~ 0 Cavkbsham- W. Barron;- .... ■- M Peninsula— James Seaton ..,. " Saieri— J. Fulton* •• JJ Bruce— Ja». Rutherford •- Mount Ida— C. A. de Lautour ... W WAKATiru- T. Fergus ... M - Dunstan- V.ffyke* ... 0 'Tuapeka- J. C. Btowo* ... o .Awarua- -J. P. Joyce .... -O JsVERCAROiiiL- >H. Beldwick ... o Matauiu— •■- Captain Mackenzie ... » IHokonci- *H. Drivrr* .... -O * Satiin last Parliament. M Mini-iterial. O-Opposition. J Independent.

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Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTION, Otago Daily Times, Issue 6190, 10 December 1881

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6,670

THE GENERAL ELECTION Otago Daily Times, Issue 6190, 10 December 1881

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