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THE WRECK OF THE TARARUA.

We are able to furnish the following additional particulars, gathered from various sources':

JOHN WILLIAMS' STATEMENT.

The Southland Times publishes the following statement,by John Williams, one of the passengers by the Tararua,-who travelled overland' to the Bluff:—' * " John Williams states that when the vessel struck he was awakened by the shock, and rushing on deck he distinctly saw the white beach; and the breakers rolling in. The Tararua could not, he'thnks have been more than 600 yards from the shore when she uTl^ ,? c (Wllllams> wa3 on "is way to England. He had 100 sovereigns in a small-bag under his pillow and in the excitement forgot to go be ow and get them. He continues: The first boat was launched at' daylight, but immediately filled and sank. The second boat was launched about half an hour afterwards and was lowered safely. She was oftk-ered by the second mate, and manned by four sailurs. Captain Garrard asked the women and children to get in, but they declined, as the sea- w;:s running mountains high and the risk appeared too g.eat. Six passengers haying volunteered to go in the boat, she started for the shore On reaching the surf three of the passengers jumped overboard. After great struggling three got. on the beach, the remaining three being drowned. I (John Williams) asked to be taken in the next boat but tho captain refused. Hill was known to have several hundred pounds with him on board the steamer. On the third boat being lowered from the Tararua it was officered by the carpenter and four sailors, and left the steamer under instructions to proceed aloi:g the coast and find a landing-place if possible. He did as ordered, but failed to find a suitable place. When he got back to the steamer the captain ordered him out of the boat. He gave up command reluctantly, and the first mate took charge He was ordered to save life if possible. Myself and three other passengers got in, and after-a good deal of trouble started for the shore. When we were about leaving the ship s side I saw Captain Garrard holdiii" the rone to assist us in getting into the boat; he was calm and collected. When we got into the breakers a heavy sea caught us and swamped our b at. We all made a rush for the shore, and all succeeded in landing except Si tK?» * v ycata- He was !ast seen st ™sCAPTAIN SUNDSTROM'S STATEMENT. Captain Sundstrom, of the s.s. Kakanui, who returned to poit yesterday, makos the following statoment:- .Left InvercargiU at 1.30 on Friday afternoon, bound for Catlm's River. I had not heard anything o

the mishap to the Tararua before leaving Invercargill. I arrived at the Bluff at about a quarter to 4 in the afternoon. It was there that I heard that the Tararua was m some sort of trouble. The information was contained in the following telegram from my agents • —'Tararua [ashore at Waipapa. Wait till 5.30 for orders. About 5.30 I got telegrams from Dunedin and InvercargiU to the effect that the Hawea was proceeding to the scene, and that the Kakanui's services wore not likely to be required. I then went to sea. I arrived off Waipapa at 8 o'clock in the evening, and determined to wait until daylight to see how the steamer was situated, i burned blueli°-hts I saw nothing whatever of the Tararua. I noticed one?big fire on shore, and also two or three smaller ones moving about the big fire. From this I concluded that the people had all landed By comparing my position at that time with what I have heard since, I reckon that I must have been lyinjr within a quarter of a mile of the wreck. At 11 o'clock on the Friday night I anchored at the back of the point. It was certainly Otara Reef on which the Tararua struck. It lies a little to the eastward of Waipapa Point. Otara is not a continuous line of reef; it is rather a series of rocks, through which a boat could thread its way in smooth water. The Kakanui had one boat on board. It ia impossible to say whether I could have rendered any material assistance had I arrived-before nightfall. Perhaps I might have got a line taken ashore by means of rockets, but I cannot say. I should, of course, have been governed by circumstances. The Kakanui was drawing 2 feet 6 inches forward and 6 feet aft, and she could have gone almost anywhere if the water was smooth. When I went past the reef on Thursday night a tremendous sea was running; in fact the heaviest I have seen for 12 months or more. Lontr blind rollers were running, and 1 think they would have broken on a reef four fathoms deep I got underweigh at 5 o'clock on Saturday morning, and hunt about under easy steam until daylight so asto find out, as I have said, what had become of the Tararua I saw nothing but wreckage. When the Hawea came up I towed the boats to a boat harbour at the mouth of Papanui River. I landed with the search party and while Captain Cameron went in the direction of Waipapa I went into the township of Toi-Tois to see whether any survivors were there. After finding out that some of those saved were all right at the station I returned to the boats, and walked down with the mate of the Tararua as far as Waipapa, in the hope of finding more survivors. It was after 5 o'clock on Saturday night when I returned, having travelled about all day without a bite to _eat. 1 hung about the locality, intending to search again on Sunday morning ; but at 1 o'clock—an hour after midnight—the weather came up bad. An hour later it commenced to blow a heavy gale from the S.S.E., and I went away to sea. It would take the Kakanui fully two hours to steam from the Bluff to where tho Tararua struck." OUR FORTROSE CORRESPONDENT'S NARBATIVE.

Friday, 29th April (half-past 10 a.m.l ■■ Young man, C. Gillbee, arrived at Fortrose with information that Tararua was hard stuck upon the Otara Beef. In reply to my question as to her position and state of the sea, he informed me that she was on the reef close in shore, and that the water was ■pretty ' smooth. I immediately requested hiui to hasten onto Wyndhamj.2s miles distant.jbeingthe nearest telegraph. othce, with telegrams in accordance with the above information, addressed to the agent and Press On receiving a reply from the agent at 10 p.m. that the Hawea would be despatched at once, I then, as soon as possible, made arrangements to proceed to Otara, • Reef, which is distant fully 12 miles, arriving there about Ip.m., where I found Captain Matheson of the 1 P'? n.eer> ,who had preceded me, in the act of lifting the , chief cook of the > essel on to a sledge, assisted by one of Mr Brunton's employes, named Patterson. The cook nad_swum_ from .the ship, and it being: flood tide ■ managed to effect a landing with bare life, for he was scarcely conscious. When brought round, hestated that he had endeavoured to assist a younsr lady to • shore with him, buthad to let her go after about 10 [ minute's struggle. The tide being on the flood when 1 arrived, 1 found a terrible heavy swell from the S E ■ hut the wind was light, and the day fine but cold! ■ The sea broke.with terrific force both--upon • the vessel and the shore, making all present tremble , for the fate of the unfortunate people on board the s vessel, and rendering assistance impossible' from the' " land. I found the long-boat had come asbore with ■ the first mate and some male steerage passengers and ■ a portion of the crew. I aUo found Mr J. S. Shanks > our district representative ; and five or six miners who • residenear, and who were formerlysailors, wereallupon i the shore striving and hoping to be useful in effortsto ■ save life and property. I found the long-boat had" • capsized in the breakers when landing, and had opened < out stem and. stern. This was hastily repaired in' i anticipation of the sea subsiding. I then took p'arK- [ cular observation of the vessel, in company with Mr • Shanks and Captain Matheson.' She was evidentlyon. the reef about J to J of, a mile distant, her bows • being about N.W. and her stem S.E. We noticed with aching hearts that each successive sea appeared i to be) endued with greater violence and force break- ■ ing with terrific force upon the poop of the vessel • and rushmg.forward and casting itself from the-bowr [ in a volume of spray. The situation of the sufferers c on the bow was most deplorable, and a considerable - number appeared to have sought refuge there and I numbers were also observed either clinging or lashed , to the side rigging of the foremast. - Others were also 1 observed to be upon the fore-yard. The stem; from i forward of engine - room, I noticed to be far below X the proper lines of the vessel, proving to our minds r she was likely to part amidship. This was observed more distinctly towards evening, when the stern porj. tion appeared to be working much too freely and at i about 4 p.m. the funnel was observed to gradually take a backward cant and to the port side of the b mizenmast This caused us serious anxiety for ■■> the safety of.those on board, for it was.apparent the vessel could not hold together long, the .shore beinff 1 also literally strewn with debris oi all kinds which 5 had rapidly accumulated from about noon The ebb I now being strong, all hands set: to work to 'remove all things of value above water-n ark, hut the principle' portion in fact nearly everything, was so fearfullysniashed by the 'powerful' surf that only three boxes . addressed "Dr Campbell," and one not addressed were found unbroken. One case cf cheese and two casks 1 of lunejuice were all I noticed perfect. About thi3 B time, also, we observed two male persons, who :had ._ managed to obtain small quantities of wood■as'tem- ! porary rafts, to be making towards the shore, but the x state of the tide doubtless delayed their progress greatly. We could observe them rise over the swell bravely endeavouring to make for shore; one, also,' j with a lifebelt on succeeded in reaching the breakers - but a sad and melancholy sight awaited those on -. shore, and an agonising end to the poor fellows who had. so bravely struggled for life. The back-draw r being so powerful, and the breakers so heavy in"their ■ exhausted state, abruptly terminated their struggle . one poor fellow only being brought out by the anxious 3 onlookers, and all efforts to resuscitate him proved s fruitless. This cast a feeling of utter helplessness and gloom over us on shore, and God only knows the deep f anguish being endured by those on the ill-fated ship f which must have been felt to them as a very frail j support through the perils of approaching, night , Attention was now given to collecting wood ana a: . large lire-was built and kept replenished so-as to> afford some little though distant cheer to the unforr tunates, and. also to serve as a beacon to expected ~ aid seaward. About 10 p.m. a steamer's light was ; Observed approaching, but in consequence of the f darkness and the dangerous position of the unfor- . tunate vessel she could not approach very close but she was observed by those on board and j we on shore could hear them give a cheer, and'after- [ wards observed them showing some small lin-ht as if of . a number of matches. Hope was now felt that a rescue would be effected ; but alas !-and it is with realpaux , that I narrate it-at 2.35 p.m. the tidehadagain made ; and the sea still raged. A crashing sou H d was neard , and a call, which seemed to say " A boat!" Then , there were Ehrieks, and all was Mali: even our very L hearts seemed to cease to beat, for the meaning waa patent to all, and an involuntary " God help them 1" escaped. The suspense was fearful until daybreak when^our fears were verified. She had evidently* parted, and the bow or forepart canted over broadside i as the whole vessel, and spars even, were totally sub- • merged. Only the end of a yard and the top of her ' spars were visible as they wese rising and falling-in the ■ rollers. I was informed by the first mate that one boat put off with the second mate -four ' sJ am, en> and two steerage passengers. The boat •_ stood out to sea, and has since been picked un (next morning) by thesailing craft Prince Rupert ; The s.s. Hawea and the s.s. Kakanui were also ob- ' served off the reef at daybreak, from foar to five s"'es distant from where the Tararua was stranded These, after steaming around for some hours stood for Toi-Tois Harbour, anchoring in the offing. The captain of the Kukanui and some men from the-Hawea , effected a landing at the Boat Harbour, and went . along the coast, bringing off the few survivors, who, I deeply regret to say, are only 20 in number. I have heard that two ladies implored one man who was saved by landing from the boat to save them. One lady then begged him to save her little baby This request was also declined, and the child consequently perished. Some comments are heard as to the females and children being left on board when strong r able bodied men, not sailors, were shipped in the , boats. The boat which stood out to-sea is said to . have been able to save at lease 25, and that which. ' came on shore could well have carried 35 or 40 persons. I am informed that the other two boats were stove in the launching. THE LATE CAPTAIN GARRARD. . Captain Garrard (says the Press) was the son of MrJoseph Gerrard, an officer in the Revenue Service afc Home, and was born on Alareh 2nd, 1852 When about 11 years of age he entered the Royal Naval School at Greenwich, and here he studied so successfully that, at the age .of 14 he was admitted to the .Nautical School to reoeive a course of instruction in navigation and nautical astronomy. At the final examination be came out at the head of the list and received a special recommendation of the Admiralty forsix months' further tuition. When he leit the schools he was head captain of his company, and carried with him the respect of all who knew him. both masters and boys. He entered Lidgett's line of vessels :and served five years' apprenticeship, visiting' during that tune the principal commercial ports of the world Dur ing his career as third mate he was wrecked in the ship Humber on an island in the Bay of Fundy but fortunately no lives were lost, and this may be attributed mainly to his exertions after the crew had succeeded in effecting a landing upon a most inhospitable shore. The disaster occurred in the depth of winter, and the men suffered Jonsiderably from, drowsiness, caused by the intense cold and the drink taken ashore with theia. Captain Garrard who then was, and has always been, a total abstainer, appears to have been in a better position to withstand the cold He succeeded in making his way over the frozen cliffs and through the snowdrifts to a fisherman's cotta<*e where he gave information of the accident and the men were rescued. Captain Garrard subsequently gained some experience in steam navigation in the Mediterranean, and came out to this Colony ab'ufc five years ago in the Dilhawar, to Wellington He went with the vessel as far as Adelaide on the return journey, and there he succeeded in obtainin"- his dis- : charge, with the intention of finally settling in the Colonies. He joined the Hawea as second mate, and obtained rapid promotion, being shifted from one boat to another at frequent intervals. Captain Garrard was chief ofiicer of the Taupo on the , occasion of herlo=s at Tauranga, and his coolness and presence ef mind on that occasion will be remembered. He then returned to Dunedin and was appointed to tho command of the Ladybird and subsequently of the Albion. On tho occasion of the changes m the Tararua consequent on the gold that veieT" 8 m°!'thS h&°K he wai ttansJerred to A LIGHT FOR WAIPAPA REEF The following letter from Mr Thomas Brodrick Lloyd's agent, appears in the Southland Times^— "May I ask you to make public the following re marks on the dangerous reef running off from Wai papa Point. Toe sad disaster and t-'reut loss of iffe through the total loss of the s s. Tararua and the numerous instances and warnings we have had by vessels striking on this reef, causes rau to take uu my pe:i to endeavour to prevent any moie loss of wi fi . Go, ver"men l t should immediately cause a, fixed l,ght to be placed at this point, to warn manners of their being near such a dangerous part of the coast The reef extends three mifcs fMta land, and the tide sets in very different courses and its force is influenced very considerably by the* strength of the wind. A gale will often entirely cause it to run with tho wind, or alter ite : course materially. Steamers generally pas Tit in the dark, and consequently not being able to see tho coast they are often driven too nenr for safety and i? is impossible for them to know their near approa-A to the reef Sailing vessels with a southerly wh™ in the night draw so near to it that the wonder"! so many escape total destruction. A lightplaced is I have before stated, would be the greatest boonto ail manners, and-we should, for the safety o! s" many passenger steamers constantly passing \,p and down p ot^rti"^ UIT th° Gover»"^»t the necessity or hrinS-wr gi. i" a , a"y COst from BUi:n a chance of ! being wrecked mso dangerous a place. The compass.

is the only guide to steer by on a dark night, hut the aberration of the needle, from local attraction, is, on ■the very near approach to some parts of the New Zealand coast so great that it cannot be depended upon -entirely. Note how the captain ran to compare the steering compass with the standard compass; but in such a case both would be useless—hence the greater necessity for placing a light on such a dangerous place."

THE KAKANUI .AND THE TARARUA.

Mr Thomas Brodrick, Lloyd's agent, sends the following letter to Tuesday's Southland Times : —" In your leading article of this morning you give a wrong ■impression about the services the s.s. Kakanui could have rendered had Mr Mills, the manager of the Union S. S. Co., employed her. Immediately I heard Of the stranding of the s.s. Tararua (although it was Stated the passengers were all saved) I thought it my duty to get the Kakanui to the scene of the disaster. The steamer had then left the Invereargill Wharf for the Bluff, and the agents told me that the captain had been instructed togo to the wreck, which he did as Boon as practicable ; consequently Icould do no more, nor could any order from Mi- Mills have been the means of saving life."

The Southland .News says: A good deal of surprise has been expressed that the steamer Kakanui, which was lying at the Invereargill jetty at the top of tide, with steam up, when news arrived of the Tararua disaster, was not at once despatched to the stranded ship. The facts of the case are these: We received the first information of the wreck at 12.45, the telegram reading—'' The s.s. Tararua, due at the Bluff this morning from the North, struck on Otara reef, near ToiTois, this morning. All lives are safe at present, and the vessel is close inshore." Feeling apprehensive for the safety of the passengers, we sent a messenger to the Union Company's agents to 'see whether they had heard of the disaster. They had not, but shortly aftorwards got a telegram something to the same effect as our own. The steamer lay at the jetty till 1.30, when.she left for the Bluff, where she arrived about 4.30 o'clock. She remained there taking in cargo, and Eailed again between 6 and 7 o'clock. Whether she had up to this time orders to proceed to the wreck we are unable to say, but it is fair to assume that if it had been anybody's business to despatch the vessel from Invercar;nll direct to the wreck, she could have reached it before nightfall, when she possibly might have been the means of saving- a good many lives, a person on the wreck haying stated that there would have been little difficulty in transhipping people thence to a vessel at sea, while as events proved it was impossible to land them through the breakers. Thinking that the steamer would be set, we appointed a representative to go with her, but not being able to learn that she had any instructions, we sent him away by the train, which started for Edendalo at a quarter past 3, he being the only person leaving Invercargill for the soene of the mishap, ihe facts mentioned in the f orrgoing suggest the desirability of the appointment of a public official at each of the principal ports, whose duty it should be to forward prompt assistance and take every precaution for the safety of life and property in cases of shipwreck.

OTHER PARTICULARS. Captain Garrard's brother arrived in Dunedin on Monday, and proceeded to the scene oi the wreck yesterday. '

Dr Campbell's father and brother-in-law arrived in Dunedin from Southbridge yesterday, and went to "Wyndham by train.

The coach in waiting to convey the passengers who arrived at Wyndham by special train on Sunday morning to the scene of the wreck belonged to Mi R. A. ■Ehott, and not to Mr Leslie as stated.

• Two of the crew who were saved—Antonio HichaUfl (cook) and Edward Johnson (A.B.)—returned to Lyttelton by the Taiaroa yesterday. -~■■-■,'.-',. Mr James Mills, managing director of the Union Steam Ship Company, has arranged with the Kakanui to-eall-at-Fortrose-and-Waikawa on Saturday-next to bring all bodies recovered to Dunedin. Those bodies riot.idehtified and claimed by friends will be interred by the Union Company at their own expense. It is hoped that between now and Saturday a good many bodies will have been washed ashore. It is intended tp.sell the wreck on Friday on account of whomit rnajrconcern.- J< •'■'--■ We are informed by. a gentleman resident at Port Chalmers, who was on great terms of intimacy with'the late Dr Campbell, that that gentleman originally studied chemistry, and served his time under the auspices of the great hous° of Duncan Flockhavt; and Co., of North Bridge, Et -".burgh. After completing- the term of'his apprenticeship with Messrs Mockhart and Co., Dr Campbell applied himself to the study of medicine, and graduated at the College of Surgeons^ Edinburgh. ; : : .Mr Adam. Gardiner (secretary of the Seamen's Union) informs our shipping "reporter that three of the crew of the Tararua who are supposed to be lost did hot leave in the vessel: Duncan Corbett, a fireman",'was "left in gaol atlyttelton; J. Gibb, A.8., left the ship prior to her departure from.Pprt Chalmers; while-William Lobban, a fireman,-alsorleft 't'Porfc Chainier1-' •< i •'

SG'ron; una.. ».- • -~... _._... It is almost certain that amonst the persons on board the Tararua whose passages were hot paid at the Company's office was a Mrs Rosenfeldt, with''her four children, who intended to join her husband in Melburrie.' On the 28th ult. John 11'Leod, an expressman who took her boxes from Kaikorai down to,tSe Diinedin railway-station, noticed that they were marked, "Pers.s.Tararuato Melbourne." Sheremarked to. the porter who put her boxes into the van of the 2^30 p.m. train to the Port that she was'going t<j Melbourne by the Tararua. Three of the children were girls. .:-.'.'.■ ....:. ' ".'. !'■"■' .".- Captain Banning, of the Prince Rupert; states that he kept in the rigging of his own vessel during the greater part of Friday night .with a rii^ht-glass, and kept the steamer's mast-head light in sight until about 5.30 a.m;, ■when'it suddenly disappeared. This "must have been when-the wreck broke up, as at daylight she had entirely disappeared.'; .. '. . . ; ;- The Southland Times.supplies the following :—" Mr J. 0. Eva, a prominent Duriedin citizen, and well known here, was last seen on the bridge, calmly- viewIng the scene." ~~ " ; :The Tararua-was a strongly "built, heavily plated Ship, constructed at Dundee in 1806 for the Panama Company, arid on the failure of that Company she passed to Messrs Jl'Meekan. Blackwood.and Co., of Melbourne,, who three years ago expended over £20,000 in compounding her engines, improving-her accommodation,' and making other important, alterations. She was subsequently purchased by the Union Steam Ship Company, and at the time of her wreck ■was thoroughly well found in every particular. She carried four large. boats and a dingey,' which would provide ample accommodation for more than the number of passengers she had aboard. ': - - -■; ■* - ■ Joseph Wallace, one of the lost passengers by the Tararua, who joined at Lyttelton (says the Press), intended going to London, and thence to Utah. He is about 21 years of age, and a few days ago sold a parcel Of land prior to his departure from New Zealand. ' Mr William Hill, his wife and child, who were" passengers by the Tararua, lived on the New Brighton road, near Christchurch, where Mr Hill had leased 50 acres of land from Mr Croser. ■ Mr Hill had disposed of the lease, but intended'to return with his:family to New Zealand after visiting, the Old Country. Mrs Hill was at first reported as having been saved, but subsequent" information proved that the rumour was without foundation, and that both she and her child have been lost. Their neighbours speak in high terms of the Hills' kiud demeanour and industrious habits. .

OurKaiapoi correspondent telegraphs as follows :— '■" Mr Thos. Jones was single. He was going Home to his aged mother at Yanton, nine miles from Oxford, England. He sold- a small property in Kaiapbi before leaving, and promised to send at least i £50 Home by draft. He was short, with fair hair, and usually wore • earrings. He was last in the ' employ of Mr Pioss, Kaiapoi Island. Mr lihearsby, of Kaiapoi, is Jones' nearest friend in Kaiapoi. Mr Wm. , White was also single. He was of medium height, fair i iair. His father was a storekeeper in. Scarborough, i Yorkshire. White was last employed at Mr R. Coup's, and at-Mr Baker's threshing-machine, Kaiapoi Island.' His nearest relation is Mr Bransby White (his uncle), who"/: resides ""at Swannanoa.: .Mr Jas. Ashworth,: vras a well-known carrier between Christchurch and - Saltwater Creek. He was on his way to England for' ihe benefit of his health, and leaves a widow and grown-up son and daughter. He was a cousin of. Mr John Ashworth, of Rochdale. Mr John Scoone, unmarried, was f rom Rangiora. He was a well-known farmer, who has for many years purposed paying a visit to his native place at Wigtou, in Cumberland. He was a close friondof Mr Stalker, who died suddenly, at Ash burton. Scoone was fair, and had lost one or two fingers off one hand. His married brother, Wm. Scoone, resides in the Rangiora district. Photographs of these passengers have been sent to Inspector Buckley, which may assist in the identification of the ' bodies if washed ashore." , .

In accordance with the provisions which form a por-; tion of the system which obtains in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, the widows of the Revs. Messrs Kichardson and Armitage,. and their families, will remain in their parsonage homes for one year, and will be paid the btipends that would, in the usual course of ■ events, have accrued to their late husbands during that: period. On the year's expiration the annual pension; to be paid to Mrs Richardson will be nearly £60 ; and' lor each of her children (of whom there are five) under ,16 years of age, an annual sum of eight guineas will ;be paid, making a total of about £100 a year. In the case of Mrs Armitage the provision will not be so: large, her late husband- havincr joined the Wesleyan, ministry at a comparatively recent date. ...-.- : A passenger by the ill-fated Tararua, named John Gordon, who is numbered with the lost, was en route for London, with the intention of being united in marriage with a lady to whom he had been engaged forsome time. Prior to his departure, it is related

"that he called at one of the banks and asked the rate of commission they would charge for the transmission. ■of £140 to London. He, however, ultimately deter-; mined to save the charges, and accordingly bought a gold-digger's belt, carefully stowing the amount in t overeighs therein, and wearing the belt constantly.) The result of his penuriousness is that the whole sum. has gone to the bottom, whilst, had it been sent Home: in the usual way, his relatives would have benefited: Iby the sad catastrophe. ■ ' Aniongst the persons lost by the Tararua disastgr were several from the Oamaru district. Their nameshave been given to us (North Otago Times) as follows:" —Messrs Hughes and wife, Mr Wilson and wife, Messrs M'Laren, M'Kenzie, Inglis, and Cook. The latter, we believe, was on his way Home to takei ■possession of a sum of money that had been left him.: MrD. Martin, who saw the Tararua sail, and who -was in Duneclin at the time of the disaster (says the! _Oamaru Mail), on receiving news thereof proceeded to Invereargill by rail, and discovered that one of the' two bodie3 that were picked up by the Hawea was that of his brother George. He conveyed it to Waimatc, :Where it will be interred to-morrow at 3 o'clock.

[by telegraph.] (from our special reporter.)

Wyxdiiam, May 3rd (4 p.m.).

I have news from the wreck up to 9.30 o'clock this. morning. There had been no more bodies discovered. ■ The police had gone on to Waikawa, but had not returned. The bodies found at Waikawa remain there.; (Per United Press Association.) ; CimiSTCiiUßcn, May 3rd. At the meeting in the Wesleyan Schoolroom, a committee was appointed to collect subscriptions for the' •families of the late Keys. Richardson arid Armitage. Mr George Gould promised £100, and £220 more was promised by others in the room. . ; Captain J. W. Clark, in the service of the LytteHon Harbour Board, has been asked to act as nautical • assessor at the inquiry into the wreck of the Tararua, but the Board cannot spare him. : Timaiuj, May 3rd. The remains of George Martin, lost in the Tararua, wore brought up by express train to-day. NEiiSCN, Maj' 3rd. ; Mr Martin, passenger per Tararua from Napier to Wellington, informs the Nelson Mail that he carefully watched both the binnacle and standard compasses, and observed them to be very unsteady. The helmsman, seeing him take an interest in it, remarked: "We can't keep her right at all. The compasses jump •about like a galvanic machine."

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18810504.2.18

Bibliographic details

THE WRECK OF THE TARARUA., Otago Daily Times, Issue 6000, 4 May 1881

Word Count
5,240

THE WRECK OF THE TARARUA. Otago Daily Times, Issue 6000, 4 May 1881

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