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ACCIDENTS AND OFFENCES.

An inquest v/as held at Outrarn on 7th inst on the body of George Christie, coach pro' prietor, who died suddenly on the previous day ihe jury found that deceased died from the effect^ of an overdose of laudanum, while labouring under a fit of temporary insanity. An accident occurred on 7ih inst. at \ vorthEast V alley, through which a lad named John Gray, living at Pine Hill, had his arm broken. It appears he was driving in a spring-cart with his father, when by some means the vehicle upset, causing its occupants to be thrown out The lad was brought to the Hospital. A correspondent has supplied us with some information regarding the explosion in the Kaitangata Coal Company's mine on the Bth inst. It appears that since the break down of the machinery—about three weeks ago it had been impossible to get the water out of the mine until a few days back. Tne shaft is 380 feet deep, and from the bottom a drive has been r put into the hill a distance of 200 feet. Mr Thcrne (the manager) and two men were f v gettin& the bottom of the shaft repaired. As the drive was dry, and there appeared to be a good current of air, Mr Thome went alon- it for a distance of 50 feet to a spot where some stuff had fallen down. He was looking about him, with the aid of a light—whether in a lantern or not our correspondent does not say— when an explosion took place. Mr Thorne threw himself on his face in the mud, and crawled to the shaft, where he found tho two men who had been knocked into the well by the force of the explosion, but not severelyhurt. Mr 1 home was burned rather severely A sad accident happened at Queenstown about three weeks ago to a lad named Irvine Daniels about nine years of age, son of Mr F. h' Daniels. While riding across a bridge his pony fell and rolled over him. The boy's injuries were not at first considered serious, but on the following- Thursday he expired, the cause of death being concussion of the brain.

A Chinaman named Ah Cb.ee was brought to town on 2nd inst. by the train from Waikouaiti, suffering from an accident, and was takeu to the Hospital. His injuries are prin-

cipally upon the lower part of his body, and are so severe that it is hardly expected he will recover. So far ns we were able to ascertain, the unfortunate man received his injuries through being jammed between some of the trucks in use upon a contract on which he was working. A shoeblack named John Gleeson met his death by drowning on the morning of the Ist instant. It seems he had been in the habit of sleeping on the Golden Age steamer, which is out of use and lie 3at ths Jetty street wharf, between the reclaimed ground and the old jetty shed. The steamer is reached by a narrow plank. Gleeson was seen about halfpast eleven on Saturday night undar the influence of drink, and it is conjectured he was making his way on board by the plauk when he fell, and was either drowned or suffocated in the mud. His body was seen when the tide was out in the morning, and information was given to the police. While the cutter Mermaid—a well-known firewood trader from Purakanui to Dunedin— was Doming up the harbour on 2nd iust., shortly after mid-day, a strong S. W. squall struck her, causing her to jibe. The effect of this was to knock overboard a man named Christian, a Norwegian, aged between 35 and 40 years, who haj been working on the Dunedin Wh-irf for some time past, and whose place of residence was in Walker street. The master of the Mermaid lost no time in lowering his little boat and proceeding in search of his lost shipmate. He pulled about for three hours, but without avail, and finally came on to the Port and reported the circumstance to Mr J. R. Monson. It is the opinion of Captain Fargie that the deceased was stunned by the blow he received from the cutter's boom while she jibed.

We regret (says the Oamaru Mail) to have to record a severe accident which happened to Mr Sampson, at Messrs Lintott and Otterson's brewery, recently. It appears, from the infor mation which has been given us, that the unfortunate gentleman was attempting to regulate the flow of the malt into a malt crushing machine, when the coat-sleeve of his left arm became entangled in the cog-whsels of the machine, thereby dragging the left fore-arm between the cogs, completely smashing all the flesh and muscles from the elbow to nearly the wrist on the under side of the arm. Fortunately he was enabled to drag his arm out before the bone was broken. Mr Lintott, who was not far off at the time, sprang to his assistance, stopped the machinery, and then bo\md up the arm tightly. Drs Garland and De Lautour, who were quickly in attendance, did all that could be done for Mr Sampson's relief on the spot, and directed his removal to the Hospital, where we hear he is going on as well as can be expected, the shock having beeu a very severe one, and the loss of blood considerable.

A man named Flaherty, at South Dun edin, recently received a nasty bite upon the lower lip from a dog on the chain, which he unwittingly approached too closely. The wound, which was not of a serious character, was dressed at the Hospital. On lothinst. (says the Tuapeka Times) while Percy Geeves was driving a load of firewood from the Molyneux Bush, his dray went over the embankment into the river, carrying with it his team. The horses, which numbered three, were drowned.

A serious accident occurred recently on a farm near Winton to Constable Mulholland. The conatable was riding over a new piece of road about three miles south of the township, opposite the farm of Mr John Thomson, jun., when his horse broke through the surface, and plunging violently threw the rider over his head. In his efforts to extricate itself ths horse trampled on the face of Constable Mulholland, inflicting serious, but not fatal, wounds. The occurrence was witnessed by Miss Thomson, who gave the alarm, and surgical assistance was promptly obtained, and the hurts attended to. The accident is much regretted in the Winton district, where Constable Mulholland is deservedly respected. A serious accident (says the Clutha Leader) occurred to the ballast train from Waipahi to Clinton, about six miles from the latter place, on the 26th ult., when, through the breaking of an axle, eight of the trucks ran off the line and five were smashed to atoms. The line was torn up for about three chains, rails bent and twisted like pieces of hoop iron, and sleepers torn up and splintered into fragments. The engine, with the two nearest trucks, providentially escaped on the line, and thus the engine driver and 3toker remained unhurt, but it is estimated that L3OO will not cover the damage. A large gang of men were speedily forwarded to the scene of disaster, and by the time the up train from Invercargill arrived the damage was so far repaired as to enable the train to pass. It is the opinion of some that the trucks are too heavily laden, some seven tons and more being put in them, whereas we believe four tons should be the maximum.

A man named Her.ry Hammond wa3 received into the Hospital on Saturday last, suffering from severe injuries caused through a fall from a horse at Balclutha about a fortnight ago. Both the unfortunate man's arms are paralysed, and he is in a very precarious state.

Op Monday last (.--ays the Tuapeka Times) a terrible accident happened to a man named Thomas George, a stockrider, of Lower Waipori, whilst driving a bullock from Upper Waipori Flat. It appears he had been driving a xmrnber of cattle, and "cut out" the bullock, which, after going a short distance, turned upon him and gored the horse in the fleshy part of the thigh, inflicting a fearful gash, causing the horse to fall. George, in attempting to get away, was rushed at by the bullock, and tossed into the air several times, leaving scarcely a shred of clothing upon hira. In calling for help assistance was soon rendered, and on examining the unfortunate fellow, it was discovered that he had sustained several injuries of a very severe nature, from which he is not expected to recover.

\v% regret (says the Mount Ida Chronicle of Friday) to announce that three mining accidents have occurred this week in this district. On Tuesday a miner named JMynn, working near Naseby, had his ankle severely bruised and sprained through being caught in a fall of earth. On Wednesday another man, named Theodore Meinert, sustained injuries to his back and head by being washed through a tunnel in Coal Pit Gully ; and on the same day, at Mount Burster, another man, named Grenfell, had his leg broken, while in a tail-race, from a fall of frozen snow and rock, which crushed his leg against the side of the race ; seemingly a similar occurrence to that by which Mv A. Guffie lost his life a year or two ago at the same digging?. The three men are in the Hospital, and are progressing as favourably as can be expected.

We have made every effort (says the Oam.iru Mail) to ascertain some information regarding Duncan Young, who was night watchman at the Oamaru Breakwater until his mysterious disappearance on the Ist of August last. At first it was supposed that he was drowned; but as no evidence has been afford that such was his fate, it was hoped that perhaps, by some means or other, he was carried away in the Garron, which sailed on the above d-ite at midday, or in the Crest of the Wave, which sailed for Greyniouth early on the morning of the same day. The captain of the Crest of the Wave knows nothing about him ; and the whole crew of the Garrou has been changed since last trip, from the mate downwards, and we have therefore not been able to interview them in reference to the matter, but we are given to understand that they are quite oblivious of his whereabouts. It would appsar, therefore, that he is either drowned, or has somewhat secretly left Oamaru.

A fatal accident occurred at the New Zealand Timber and Woodwave Factory, Princes street, at 4 o'clock on Monday afternoon. Mr Thomas White, one of the joiners, was going-up a ladder into the carpenter's shop, when a piece of timber was thrown from a saw and struck him on the back of the head, killing him almost instantly. The wood had become fastened, and when an eifort was made to free it, it was thrown off by the saw with much violence. No one could be blamed in the matter, as it was purely accidental. The deceased wasayouug man, 23 years of age. and the only support of a widowed mother. He was a native of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, andarrived id Otagoabontll months ago in the Jarr.es Nicol Fleming. Very deep sympathy is felt for Mrs White, and some of her relatives, who live near Duuedin, were sent for at once, The deceased was untnar ried.

A _ very sudden death occurred at Tokomairiro on Sunday last. Mr Andrew Kay, a very old and respected settler, about GO years of age, who was apparently in his usual good health, was escoiting a friend part of the way home, when he felt a little unwell and called upon Miss Davidson, and asked leave to rest for a while. He also requeste J that his coat and waistcoat should be taken off and his shirt unbuttoned at the neck. Another neighbour, Mr Shaw, was called to his assistance. The deceased remained about 20 jcinutes sitting, and then suddenly expired. He was afterwards conveyed home. The deceased had been suffering from heart disease for the last 1-i or 15 years.

Mr Andrew Miller,^ jun., while driving a team of horses from Glenore to his own residence last Saturday night, met with a very severe accideDt. It appears that the shatt horse took fright at some loose metal lying on the road-side. Mr Miller, who was riding on the dray at the time, was unable to manage the animal, and as ib was heading for a gravel pit, and seeing that nothing could prevent a general smash, he attempted to jutnp from the dray to save himself; but in doing so his foot caught the handle of the break, causing him to fall under the dray, and the wheel of the dray passed over his leg, breaking both bones. Mr Miller was attended by Dr Stewart.

Richard Cranfell, a carpenter by trade, working f.;r Messrs M'Kenzie, Paisley, and Murcott, railway contractors, met with rather a serious accident at Palmerston on Monday. He had been attending to the loading of some timber in one of the ballast trucks, and was riding on the outside while the engine was removing the truck. Somehow or other he fell off, and before he could recover himself one of the trucks passed over his leg, completely cutting through the calf. Dr Brown was speedily sent for, and succeeded ia sewitg up the wounds. It will be some time before the unfortunate man can resume work.

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Bibliographic details

ACCIDENTS AND OFFENCES., Otago Daily Times, Issue 5181, 25 September 1878

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2,281

ACCIDENTS AND OFFENCES. Otago Daily Times, Issue 5181, 25 September 1878

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